Science2.0

Antitumor Agent Can Be Activated By Natural Response To Cell Stress

Science2.0 - June 12, 2015 - 1:52pm

Scientists have found that a drug candidate with anticancer potential can be activated by one of the body's natural responses to cellular stress.

Once activated, the agent can kill prostate cancer cells.

The study highlights the potential of the natural compound called leinamycin E1 (LNM) for development as a "prodrug," a medication converted through a metabolic process in the body to become an active therapy.


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It's Hard To Fix A Student's Mindset About Their Own Intelligence

Science2.0 - June 12, 2015 - 1:36pm
How children think about their own ability can affect their progress and achievement at school, according to a number of education scholars. 

The work of Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck and her concept of “mindset” has been particularly influential in the way teachers are trying to change their pupils' views of their own intelligence.

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Increased Risk With Teen Moms, Finds Study Of Parental Age And Autism

Science2.0 - June 12, 2015 - 1:09pm

A study of parental age and autism risk including 
5.7 million children in five countries
found increased autism rates among the children of teen moms and among children whose parents have relatively large gaps between their ages. It also confirmed that older parents are at higher risk of having children with autism. 

Though previous studies identified a link between advancing parental age and autism risk, many aspects of the association remained unclear. For example, some studies found increased risk with older dads but not moms. The goal of the new study was to determine whether advancing maternal or paternal ages independently increase autism risk, and to what extent each might do so.


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Dynamic Whole-Body PET Scan Detects More Cancer

Science2.0 - June 12, 2015 - 1:00pm

Imaging lung cancer requires both precision and innovation and clinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reates advanced whole-body parametric maps, which allow quantitative evaluation of tumors and metastases throughout the body, according to research announced at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI). 


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Book Review: Tom Stossel's "Pharmaphobia"

Science2.0 - June 12, 2015 - 12:58pm
During my 25-year-career in drug discovery research, when I told people what I did for a living, I ran into the same response over and over: "How can you work for such an evil industry?" 

Yet, after even brief discussions of what the jobs in profession were really like— that being, a fierce devotion to finding treatments for the worst diseases in the face of an overwhelming array of nearly impossible obstacles—virtually everyone I spoke with changed their opinions. 
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FMRI And Memory Detectors - Easily Fooled

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 8:00pm

Real-time brain scans coupled with a machine-learning algorithm can reveal whether a person has memory of a particular subject, but with a little bit of concentration people can easily hide their memories from the computer.


Memory is obviously important, in areas like eyewitness testimony, medicine and even marketing. Programs that can read a person's brain scan data and surmise whether that person is experiencing a memory could be important for those reasons.

But with just a little bit of coaching and concentration, subjects are easily able to obscure real memories, or even create fibs that look like real memories, on brain scans. For cooperative subjects, things are good, but for high-stakes situations knowing they can be spoofed is important.


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What The 'Dad Bod' Phenomenon Says About Media And Culture

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 7:30pm
Everyone, it seems, has been talking about “dad bod” – what defines it, who possesses it and whether or not women actually love it.

It all began with an innocuous article on a college news website, penned by a Clemson University student named Mackenzie Pearson.

“The dad bod is a nice balance between a beer gut and working out,” she wrote. “While we all love a sculpted guy, there is just something about the dad bod that makes boys seem more human, natural, and attractive.”

Pearson’s post first made the rounds on social media, before receiving mainstream media attention.

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Fact Checking Dr. Oz's Fact Checker

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 7:24pm
Dr. Oz has done a lot of things right recently. He has promised to stop calling everything a 'miracle cure' and after the cultural blow-up this spring, when a group of prominent doctors and PhDs nationwide asked Columbia to remove him, and then a group at Columbia criticized him in USA Today, he apologized and noted that the "Dr." in the title was meant to be small. -->

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Injectable Electronics Create Cyborg Tissue

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 7:00pm

Electronic devices that can be injected directly into the brain, or other body parts, have been a staple of science fiction for decades - and they seem a little closer to reality if you visit Charles Lieber's chemistry lab at Harvard. 

A team of international researchers, led by Lieber, has developed a method for fabricating nano-scale electronic scaffolds that can be injected via syringe. Once connected to electronic devices, the scaffolds can be used to monitor neural activity, stimulate tissues and even promote regenerations of neurons.  


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What Do Damaged Walnuts Smell Like? Why They Cause An Insect Frenzy

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 6:00pm

In collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture, the University of the Basque Country Department of Analytical Chemistry has identified the volatile compounds in damaged walnuts that insects find attractive and which is threatening the harvests of these nuts in California.

These are the first studies carried out on walnuts which are designed to specify the components of the aroma and which can be used to control the moth pests in the most sustainable way, besides helping to cut the use of pesticides and control agents. 


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Food Waste Paradox - Cooking From Scratch Leads To More Garbage

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 5:33pm

Food wasted means money wasted which can be an expensive problem especially in homes with financial constraints. A new study from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab and the Getulio Vargas Foundation, shows that the top causes of food waste in such homes include buying too much, preparing in abundance, unwillingness to consume leftovers, and improper food storage.

"Fortunately," notes lead author Gustavo Porpino, PhD candidate at the Getulio Vargas Foundation and Visiting Scholar at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab, "most of the factors that lead to food waste, can be easily remedied by simple changes in food buying, preparing, and storing."


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Disabled People Pay For Sex Too: What Happens When Buying It Is Criminalized But Selling Isn't?

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 4:30pm
Northern Ireland recently changed the law to criminalize the act of paying for sex. This follows a trend set in Sweden, where selling sex is legal but buying it is criminalized.

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Can Gaming Help People With "Lazy Eye" See In 3D?

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 3:30pm

I’m on the back seat of the lower deck of a number 37 bus, outside the red-brick and Portland stone clock tower of Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, south London.  Although I know exactly where I am, I feel lost. I no longer know whether to trust what my eyes are telling me.

I’ve just been told by a leading vision scientist that I have no real depth perception. 

In other words, I have never seen in three dimensions the way most people do.

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Avoiding Blurry Vision - How Nerve Cells Stabilize Visual Images

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 3:00pm
Lisa Marie Potter, Inside Science - Thank goodness for autostabilization, the digital camera feature that compensates for movement to achieve that crystal-clear, spontaneous selfie.
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Jurassic World: Pre-1980s Understanding Of Dinosaurs For An Audience Of 2015

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 1:30pm
Jurassic World brings to life the fantasy of an amusement park where genetically engineered dinosaurs are the main attraction, as first imagined in the original book, then movie Jurassic Park back in 1993. This fourth movie in the franchise, in cinemas from today, is certainly action-packed, although there are a number of opportunities missed when it comes to how these beasts are represented.

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New Drug Ixekizumab Can Clear All Psoriasis Symptoms

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 1:25pm
A new psoriasis drug, ixekizumab , has resulted in 40 percent of people showing a complete clearance of psoriatic plaques after 12 weeks of treatment and over 90 percent showing improvement.
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Pig Behavior And Emotions Similar To Dogs?

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 4:30am
A psychologist and an English professor have written a review of studies and concluded that pigs perform as well as or better than dogs on some tests of behavioral and cognitive sophistication, and they compare favorably to chimpanzees.

The review by Emory psychologist Dr. Lori Marino and visiting English Professor Christina M. Colvin, seeks to extrapolate results to deduce what we do and do not know about pigs. The areas they discuss include cognition, emotion, self-awareness, personality and social complexity.

They conclude that “pigs possess complex ethological traits similar … to dogs and chimpanzees.” For example, pigs: -->

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Population Control: Progesterone Contraceptive Vaginal Ring On WHO Essential Medicines List

Science2.0 - June 11, 2015 - 12:44am

The World Health Organization released its 2015 updated essential medicines list and for the first time included the progesterone contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR), a contraceptive safe and effective for lactating women in the postpartum period.

The progesterone CVR, developed by the Population Council, is an intravaginal ring that provides women who breastfeed at least four times a day with a contraceptive option as early as four weeks after giving birth. It can be used for up to a year for improved birth spacing.


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Edit Distance In Genomes - Longstanding Algorithm Worry Put To Rest

Science2.0 - June 10, 2015 - 10:00pm
Comparing the genomes of different species — or different members of the same species — is the basis of a great deal of modern biology because DNA sequences conserved across species are likely to be functionally important, while variations between members of the same species can indicate different susceptibilities to disease.
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6 Facts On Human-Caused Earthquakes, From USGS

Science2.0 - June 10, 2015 - 9:30pm

The central United States has undergone a dramatic increase in seismicity over the past 6 years. From 1973-2008, there was an average of 24 earthquakes of magnitude 3 and larger per year. From 2009-2014, the rate steadily increased, averaging 193 per year and peaking in 2014 with 688 earthquakes. So far in 2015, there have been 430 earthquakes of that size in the central U.S. region through the end of May.

There are many questions and misconceptions about what’s happening. How does the observed increase relate to oil and gas production activities? Does this connect to fracking—more formally known as hydraulic fracturing? What exactly is fracking? What are induced earthquakes?


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