Earth

College Park, Md. -- The success of electric car batteries depends on the miles that can be driven on a single charge, but the current crop of lithium-ion batteries are reaching their natural limit of how much charge can be packed into any given space, keeping drivers on a short tether. Now, researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD), the U.S.

In the future, plants will be able to create their own fertilizer. Farmers will no longer need to buy and spread fertilizer for their crops, and increased food production will benefit billions of people around the world, who might otherwise go hungry.

These statements may sound like something out of a science fiction novel, but new research by Washington University in St. Louis scientists show that it might soon be possible to engineer plants to develop their own fertilizer. This discovery could have a revolutionary effect on agriculture and the health of the planet.

Think of it like a geological mystery story: For decades, scientists have known that some 25,000 years ago, a massive ice sheet stretched to cover most of Canada and a large section of the northeastern United States, but what's been trickier to pin down is how - and especially how quickly - did it reach its ultimate size.

One clue to finding the answer to that mystery, Tamara Pico said, may be the Hudson River.

The remnants of former Tropical Storm Beryl are being battered by upper level winds, and that's fragmenting them even more. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and found some of those scattered thunderstorms were strong.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Beryl's remnants on July 13 at 2:05 a.m. EDT (0605 UTC) and analyzed the storm in infrared light. Infrared light provides temperature data and that's important when trying to understand how strong storms can be. The higher the cloud tops, the colder and the stronger they are.

Washington, DC - July 13, 2018 - The concentration of enterococci, bacteria that thrive in feces, has long been the federal standard for determining water quality. Researchers have now shown that the greatest influences on that concentration are the quantity of mammalian feces in the water, and the numbers of enterococci that glom onto floating particulate matter. The research is published Friday, July 13 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Genetic research at Oregon State University has shed new light on how isolated populations of the same species evolve toward reproductive incompatibility and thus become separate species.

Scientists sequenced the entire genome of a Pacific tidepool crustacean, Tigriopus californicus, a model species for differentiation based on geographic separation - an early stage of one species becoming multiple species.

News Release: July 12, 2018 - Projections by climate scientists suggest that severe droughts may become more frequent over the next century, with significant impacts to wildlife habitat. Fortunately, new research from scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science and The Nature Conservancy shows how financial incentive programs can create vital habitat for waterbirds, filling a critical need in drought years.

After Halloween, people tend to forget about bats. But, for farmers, residents of Kenya, and scientists, bats are a part of everyday life. While North America has 44 species, Kenya, a country the size of Texas, has 110 bat species. Many of these species also contain subspecies and further divisions that can make the bat family tree look like a tangled mess. Researchers set out to cut the clutter by sorting the lineages of yellow house bats and in the process found two new species.

A new Portland State University study shows that even though water quality has improved in South Korea's Han River basin since the 1990s, there are still higher-than-acceptable levels of pollutants in some of the more urbanized regions in and around the capital Seoul.

The study by Heejun Chang, a geography professor in PSU's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Janardan Mainali, a Ph.D. student in geography, was published online in the Journal of Hydrology in June. It was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Glenview, IL, July 12, 2018 - Some patients with COPD demonstrate signs of accelerated aging. In a new study published in the journal CHEST® researchers report that measuring blood telomeres, a marker of aging of cells, can be used to predict future risk of the disease worsening or death.