Culture

Fasciola hepatica is a parasite that causes on average 3.2 million in losses in the agricultural sector every year worldwide. It is a two-centimeter-long worm at adult size that mainly affects ruminants by means of water or raw vegetables that act as vehicles of infection. Moveover, in developing countries with deficient sanitary control systems, more than five million people have been infected. Though it does not have high death rates, it causes liver damage and makes the host more prone to catching other diseases.

The largest study of bisexual people in the world to date, led by La Trobe University, has examined why bisexual people experience higher rates of psychological distress than heterosexual and homosexual people.

Questioning more than 2,600 bisexual people across Australia, the Who I Am study's aim was to uncover the reasons for poor mental health in bisexual people. The study found significant links between poor mental health and the following factors:

Bisexual people who are in heterosexual relationships;

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have developed a sustainable way to demonstrate a new genetic modification that can increase the yield of natural oil in seeds by up to 15 per cent in laboratory conditions.

The new method can be applied to crops such as canola, soybean and sunflower, which are in a multi-billion dollar industry that continues to see increasing global demand.

There is an important association between maternal cigarette smoking cessation during pregnancy and risk of preterm birth, according to a new Dartmouth-led study published in JAMA Network Open.

The negative health impacts of cigarette smoking during pregnancy--which include low birth weight, delayed intrauterine development, preterm birth, infant mortality, and long-term developmental delays--are well known. In good news, the proportion of women who start their pregnancy as smokers has been declining in recent years.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Hospitality service Airbnb is fast becoming the 800-pound gorilla that's shaking up the hotel industry and forever changing it.

New research from Florida State University finds Airbnb's exponential growth worldwide is devouring an increasing share of hotel revenues and also driving down room prices and occupancy rates.

Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply. Intriguingly, the process initially appears to contradict the fundamental laws of physics.

Researchers from HSE University and London Business School have carried out research into the dynamics of the prices for Russian companies' stocks and depositary receipts. The research indicates that, thanks to their price differences, there are opportunities for profitable trading with zero or, at least, minimum risk.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1540496X.2018.1564276?scroll=top&needAccess=true

As genome sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, resulting in an exponential increase in data, the need for efficiency in predicting gene function is growing, as is the need to train the next generation of scientists in bioinformatics. Researchers in the lab of Lukas Mueller, a faculty member of the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), have developed a strategy to fulfill both of these needs, benefiting students and researchers in the process.

When it comes to making moral decisions, we often think of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Yet, why we make such decisions has been widely debated. Are we motivated by feelings of guilt, where we don't want to feel bad for letting the other person down? Or by fairness, where we want to avoid unequal outcomes? Some people may rely on principles of both guilt and fairness and may switch their moral rule depending on the circumstances, according to a Radboud University - Dartmouth College study on moral decision-making and cooperation.

Behavioural problems in young people with severe antisocial behaviour - known as conduct disorder - could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centres together, according to new research led by the University of Birmingham.