Brain

Shows for the first time that complex, mixed simultaneous emotions in adolescents could be assessed using an Analogue Emotion Scale

Potential to supplement traditional emotional assessments where emotions are complex and people 'may not have the words'

Next step: trials to test the findings in practice

Leesburg, VA, July 24, 2019--A new cosmetic product, magnetic eyelashes, should be of interest and concern to radiology professionals working in the MRI environment, according to an ahead-of-print article published in the November 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

HANOVER, N.H. - July 24, 2019 - A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colors or even studying complex theories.

The research, published in Cognitive Science, adds to the existing evidence that adults, children and students of all ages learn better when seeing an object before hearing its description. The study builds on past research by focusing on learning in "inconsistent" environments featuring different teaching styles or distracting noises.

It seems like a great idea: Pay teachers more if their students learn more. But does it work?

Though teacher incentive programs are growing in popularity, no one knows for sure if they have a positive effect on student achievement, or if they are worth the extra expenditure of precious state education funds. A new study by an economist at the University of California, Riverside shows that, if properly designed, teacher incentive programs can both improve student achievement in some subjects and be cost-effective.

The higher prevalence of suicide among Indigenous peoples in Canada has been extensively documented, but little research has focused on factors associated with recovery among those who have had suicidal thoughts. A new nationally representative Canadian study from the University of Toronto and Algoma University found that three-quarters of formerly suicidal Indigenous adults who are living off-reserve had been free from suicidal thoughts in the past year.

DALLAS (SMU) -College students in Texas who graduated from public universities with a bachelor's degree had, on average, student loan debts that equaled 74 percent of what they earned in their first-year wages, according to a new study from SMU (Southern Methodist University).

The study, which looked at students who started college between 2004 and 2008, also shows that black and Latinx students are predicted to borrow larger amounts of college debt than white students compared to what they'll make in their first job.

A special Lancet Series on Oral Health, published today in The Lancet, presents an "urgent need for radical reform" of oral healthcare to prioritize prevention and integrate dentistry into primary care. The series is comprised of two papers, both co-authored by Habib Benzian, DDS, MScDPH, PhD, the associate director of global health and policy for NYU College of Dentistry's World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Quality-improvement, Evidence-based Dentistry--the only WHO Collaborating Center on oral health in the Americas.

In a first of its kind study, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute evaluated the language use of black mothers in comparison with white mothers with the same education levels to measure the amount and complexity of the words they use with their infants and young children. This study resulted in the new discovery that race played no role in the amount and quality of the words they used with their children or with the language skills their children later develop.

Fifty years ago, on July 20, 1969, the world watched as Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon. Since then, space agencies around the globe have sent rovers to Mars, probes to the furthest reaches of our galaxy and beyond, yet humanity's curiosity and fascination with the Moon has never abated.

Mars is about 9 months from Earth with today's tech, NASA reckons. As the new space race hurtles forward, Harvard researchers are asking: how do we make sure the winners can still stand when they reach the finish line?

EAST LANSING, Mich. - Michigan State University researchers have found that many stroke patients feel unprepared when discharged from the hospital. Their caregivers feel the same.

But when a home-based support network using social work case managers and online resources is put into place, quality of life and confidence in managing one's health improve, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Main Findings:

The high-stakes accountability policies used to monitor the quality of Head Start preschool centers may miss important variation in classroom quality within centers, which could lead to incorrect representations of center quality and inaccurate decisions about which programs need to re-compete for their funding.

Adolescent girls who self-injure feel that they receive more negative feedback than they actually receive, and are more sensitive to "thumbs down" responses, compared to other adolescent girls. These are the findings presented by Irene Perini, researcher at Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN) at Linköping University, in a recently published article.

A Rutgers University researcher contributed to the first study to seek input from people with common mental health issues on how their disorders are described in diagnostic guidelines.

The study, which was conducted by researchers in the United Kingdom and the United States in collaboration with the World Health Organization Department of Mental Health, appears in The Lancet.

(New York, NY - July 15, 2019) -- Mount Sinai researchers working as part of an international team have discovered previously unknown breastfeeding patterns of an extinct early human species by studying their 2-million-year-old teeth, providing insights into the evolution of human breastfeeding practices, according to a study published in Nature in July.