Body

A multidisciplinary team from the University of Granada has developed software that can make it easier to identify potential pancreatic cancer biomarkers and thereby achieve earlier diagnosis of the disease. Pancreatic cancer can be diagnosed using biomarkers which, in this case, are differentially expressed genes indicative of this illness.

Melanomas are one of the most aggressive types of tumors in humans. Despite remarkable success with new forms of treatment such as immunotherapies, there are still many melanoma patients who cannot be cured or who later suffer a recurrence of the disease following successful treatment. An in-depth understanding of the tumor's biology is thus essential for developing novel therapeutic approaches. The main question is which changes in a benign cell cause it to progress into a malignant tumor.

Formation and spread of melanoma also regulated epigenetically

Australia's national science agency CSIRO has identified a new gene that plays a critical role in regulating the body's immune response to infection and disease.

The discovery could lead to the development of new treatments for influenza, arthritis and even cancer.

The gene, called C6orf106 or "C6", controls the production of proteins involved in infectious diseases, cancer and diabetes. The gene has existed for 500 million years, but its potential is only now understood.

Important steps in the development of an artificial ovary have been successfully completed by one of the world's leading groups in fertility preservation. Researchers from the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark, report today that they have for the first time isolated and grown human follicles to a point of "biofunctionality" on a bioengineered ovarian scaffold made of "decellularised" ovarian tissue. The early-stage follicles were isolated from patients having ovarian tissue frozen for fertility preservation ahead of other medical treatments likely to compromise ovarian function.

A simple $20 blood test could help diagnose thousands of patients with hepatitis B in need of treatment in some of Africa's poorest regions.

Researchers have developed an accurate diagnostic score that consists of inexpensive blood tests to identify patients who require immediate treatment against the deadly hepatitis B virus - which can lead to liver damage or cancer (1).

June 29, 2018 - Routine assessment by an endocrinologist and laboratory tests to measure hormone levels aren't necessary in most adolescent boys with gynecomastia (male breast enlargement), concludes a study in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the America

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may slow the progression of tremor for early-stage Parkinson's disease patients, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released in the June 29 online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study is the first evidence of a treatment that slows the progression of one of the cardinal features of Parkinson's, but a larger-scale clinical trial across multiple investigational centers is needed to confirm the finding.

(SACRAMENTO) -- Using catheter-based ablation instead of medications alone reduces the risks of death and stroke in patients with the common form of heart arrhythmia known as atrial fibrillation, or AFib, new research from UC Davis physicians shows.

Ablation is currently only recommended when AFib medications don't work or aren't well tolerated.

-- Introduction of vaccines has successfully reduced prevalence of bacterial meningitis and most cases in the UK today are caused by viruses.

Viruses are the most common cause of meningitis in adults aged 16 and older in the UK, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. Although generally seen as a benign condition, this new observational study shows that recovery from viral meningitis can be a long haul for patients, with many still experiencing memory and mental health problems months after they are released from hospital.

The first major paper looking at the causes and consequences of meningitis in the UK has found that viruses are now the most common cause of meningitis in adults and a cause of substantial long-term ill health. The paper also found that the management of many patients with meningitis is sub-optimal.