Tech

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. - A new manufacturing technique developed by researchers from Binghamton University, State University at New York may be able to avoid the "coffee ring" effect that plagues inkjet printers.

The outer edges of the ring that a coffee mug leaves behind are darker than the inside of the ring. That's because the solute is separated from the liquid during the evaporation process. That's what's called the coffee ring effect.

The way research in quantum technology will be taken forward has been laid out in a revised roadmap for the field.

Published today in the New Journal of Physics, leading European quantum researchers summarise the field's current status, and examine its challenges and goals.

In the roadmap:

Dr Rob Thew and Professor Nicolas Gisin look at quantum communication, and when we may expect to see long-distance quantum key distribution networks

A new study suggests that long-term exposure to secondhand smoke during childhood increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) death in adulthood. The study also suggests secondhand smoke exposure as an adult increases the risk of death not only from COPD but also several other conditions.

Years after the end of the Human Genome Project (HGP), which mapped the human genetic blueprint, its contributions to science and scientific culture are still unfolding.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- The mechanics behind how an important process within the cell traps material before recycling it has puzzled scientists for years. But Penn State researchers have gained new insight into how this process seals off waste, much like a trash bag.

New research out of the University of Waterloo has found a novel method to extend the battery life of smartphones for up to an hour each day.

The researchers have developed an app which smartphone users can use to reduce the energy consumption of their devices without any significant impact on performance.

Ordinary WiFi can easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led study.

An undergraduate researcher has developed a method to screen frogs for an infectious disease that has been linked to mass die-offs of frogs around the world. Thanks to her method, scientists will be able to track the disease and try to figure out why it is triggering the deaths.

If you happen to have a box of spaghetti in your pantry, try this experiment: Pull out a single spaghetti stick and hold it at both ends. Now bend it until it breaks. How many fragments did you make? If the answer is three or more, pull out another stick and try again. Can you break the noodle in two? If not, you're in very good company.

The spaghetti challenge has flummoxed even the likes of famed physicist Richard Feynman '39, who once spent a good portion of an evening breaking pasta and looking for a theoretical explanation for why the sticks refused to snap in two.

More than 100 years ago, German Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept -- a method that clinicians might one day use to target invading microbes without harming other parts of the body. Although chemotherapies have been highly useful as targeted treatments for cancer, unwanted side effects still plague patients. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have demonstrated that specialized nucleic acid-based nanostructures could be used to target cancer cells while bypassing normal cells.