Earth

Study finds engineered rice lines with low stomatal density used just 60 per cent of the normal amount of water and were able to survive drought and high temperatures for longer than unaltered plants.

Almost half of the global rice crop derives from rain-fed agricultural systems where drought and high temperatures are predicted to become more frequent and damaging under climate change.

Rice cultivation is particularly water intensive - using an estimated 2,500 litres of water per kilogram.

Two years after a CIRES and CU Boulder team discovered a previously unknown class of waves rippling continuously through the upper Antarctic atmosphere, they've uncovered tantalizing clues to the waves' origins. The interdisciplinary science team's work to understand the formation of "persistent gravity waves" promises to help researchers better understand connections between the layers of Earth's atmosphere--helping form a more complete understanding of air circulation around the world.

The dust that coats much of the surface of Mars originates largely from a single thousand-kilometer-long geological formation near the Red Planet's equator, scientists have found.

A study published in the journal Nature Communications found a chemical match between dust in the Martian atmosphere and the surface feature, called the Medusae Fossae Formation.

Infrared satellite imagery provides temperature data, and when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Wukong, the coldest cloud tops circling the center resembled a strawberry and leaf.

Cloud top temperatures determine strength of the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone. The colder the cloud top, the stronger the uplift in the storm that helps thunderstorm development. Basically, infrared data helps determine where the most powerful storms are within a tropical cyclone.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - A continuous wall on the border between the United States and Mexico would harm a multitude of animal species by fragmenting their geographic ranges, Oregon State University distinguished professor of ecology William Ripple has concluded, supported by thousands of other scientists around the globe.

Ripple is one of 16 co-authors from the U.S. and Mexico, including four members of the National Academy of Sciences, of a paper published today in BioScience that outlines the wall's impacts on biodiversity.

Borderlands are synonymous with desolation, but the Mexico-U.S. divide is something altogether different. The nearly 2,000-mile-long border traverses some of the continent's most biologically diverse regions, including forests, grasslands and salt marshes - home to more than 1,500 native animal and plant species, according to an analysis published in BioScience on July 24.

Amidst increased tensions over the US-Mexico border, a multinational group of over 2500 scientists have endorsed an article cautioning that a hardened barrier may produce devastating ecological effects while hampering binational conservation efforts. In the BioScience Viewpoint , a group led by Robert Peters, William J. Ripple, and Jennifer R. B.

Amsterdam, July 23rd 2018 - A new peer-reviewed study published in the prestigious journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research shows that exhaled e-vapour product particles are actually liquid droplets that evaporate within seconds.

LOGAN, UTAH, USA -- Conservation biologists recognize a sobering reality.

"We're losing species left, right and center," says Utah State University scientist Will Pearse. "We call it the 'Noah's Ark Problem,' and we have to pick species to save. We can't save them all."

The biblical mariner seemed capable of building a vessel to accommodate mating pairs of all the world's creatures. The metaphor, today, however, would portray the harried Noah bailing water and valiantly trying to prioritize saving animals most beneficial for the future, as his boat rapidly sank.

Two NASA satellites observed Tropical Storm Ampil in six and a half hours and found the storm's heaviest rainfall occurring in a band of thunderstorms shifted from north to south of the center. NASA's GPM satellite passed over the storm first and NASA's Aqua satellite made the second pass.

Tropical Storm Ampil was moving toward the northwest with winds of about 50 knots (57.5 mph) when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew above on July 20, 2018 at 2:56 a.m. EDT (0656 UTC).