Culture

When trying to determine how best to deter doping in competitive sports, who better to ask than the athletes themselves? A first-of-its-kind study in Frontiers in Psychology did precisely that by asking top level German cyclists and field athletes to rate which anti-doping methods they perceived as the most effective.

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -- People with psychopathic tendencies are slightly more likely to be a company boss, but a new study finds men are allowed a pass for those inclinations while women are punished.

The study, published online today in the Journal of Applied Psychology, finds concern over psychopathic tendencies in bosses may be overblown, but that gender can function to obscure the real effects.

ITHACA, N.Y. - With bee pollinators in decline and pesky crop pests lowering yields, sustainable and organic farmers need environmentally friendly solutions.

One strategy is to border crops with wildflower plantings to attract pollinators and pest predators. But scientists have suggested that such plantings may only be effective when farms are surrounded by the right mix of natural habitat and agricultural land.

Diabetic patients are more likely to die from alcohol-related factors, accidents or suicide, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The study findings suggest that the increased risk of death from these causes may be related to the mental health of patients, which may be adversely affected by the psychological burden of living with and self-treating this debilitating disease, with potentially serious complications.

WASHINGTON -- A research team, led by investigators from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, details how a natural and dramatic process -- changes in mammary glands to accommodate breastfeeding -- uses a molecular process believed to contribute to survival of pre-malignant breast cells.

Despite expectations that stereotypically feminine leadership traits like communality will define 21st century leaders, the higher up we look across different types of organizations, the fewer women we find. A new study exploring this apparent contradiction reveals these communal leader traits -- like being tolerant and cooperative -- are viewed as desirable but ultimately superfluous add-ons. Instead, both men and women believe successful leaders need stereotypically masculine traits such as assertiveness and competence.

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)--operators of the world's largest particle physics lab--near Geneva, Switzerland, is said to be the largest particle accelerator in the world. The accelerator lies in a tunnel 27 kilometers in circumference, as deep as 175 meters beneath the French-Swiss border. This, by the way, has helped scientists uncover the Higgs boson, the last particle predicted by the Standard Model in 2012.

A research team has discovered that abnormal vision in childhood can affect the development of higher-level brain areas responsible for things such as attention.

The researchers from the University of Waterloo, University of British Columbia, and the University of Auckland uncovered differences in how the brain processes visual information in patients with various types of lazy eye. In doing so, they are the first to demonstrate that the brain can divert attention away from a lazy eye when both eyes are open.

A fine line exists between confidence and arrogance, and many in positions of power --such as politicians and CEOs -- often are labeled arrogant. Although confidence can serve as both a blessing and a curse, new research from the University of Notre Dame shows how people can reap the rewards without risking the social penalties for overconfidence.

Terrorist attacks injure far more people than they kill, leaving victims with lost limbs, hearing loss, respiratory disease, depression and other issues. But little research has measured the impact of that damage beyond the number of people who are hurt.