Tech

A discovery by an international team of researchers from Princeton University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Humboldt University in Berlin points the way to more widespread use of an advanced technology generally known as organic electronics.

MISSOULA - The origins of social inequality might lie in the remnants of ancient Eurasia's agricultural societies, according to an article recently published in the major science journal Nature.

The article, "Greater post-Neolithic wealth disparities in Eurasia than in North America and Mesopotamia," includes research from Anna Prentiss, a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Montana.

ITHACA, N.Y. - How does the Japanese tree frog figure into the latest work of noted mathematician Steven Strogatz? As it turns out, quite prominently.

"We had read about these funny frogs that hop around and croak," said Strogatz, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics. "They form patterns in space and time. Usually it's about reproduction. And based on how the other guy or guys are croaking, they don't want to be around another one that's croaking at the same time as they are, because they'll jam each other."

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory is collaborating with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to provide system software expertise and a development ecosystem for a future high-performance computing (HPC) system based on 64-bit ARM processors.

Crosstalk and noise can become a major source of reliability problems of CNT based VLSI interconnects in the near future. Downscaling of component size in integrated circuits (ICs) to nanometer scale coupled with high density integration makes it challenging for researchers to maintain signal integrity in ICs. There are high chances of occurrence of crosstalk between adjacent wires. This crosstalk in turn, will increase the peak noise in the transient signals that pass through the interconnects.

Electrochemistry has undergone a renaissance in recent years and numerous research groups are currently working on the environmentally friendly production or conversion of molecules. However, despite the superiority of electrochemistry, its application to various molecules has been problematic. The electrolysis of highly reactive substances, for example, has so far only led to the formation of high-molecular weight products, i.e., polymers.

La Jolla, Calif., November 17, 2017 -- A new collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and UC San Diego School of Medicine has found that a medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective for Zika virus. The drug, called chloroquine, has a long history of safe use during pregnancy, and is relatively inexpensive. The research was published today in Scientific Reports.

A technique which revolutionises cell culture by allowing the continuous production and collection of cells, has been developed by scientists at Newcastle University.

The process removes the limit on the number of cells that can be grown in a culture dish, which until now has been strictly confined by its surface area.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture remains a priority in many countries as the world seeks to address climate change. In particular, the most recent report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change shows that geological storage of carbon dioxide is required for all scenarios that can meet 430 - 550 ppm CO2 atmospheric concentrations (Working Group III, IPCC 5th Assessment Report, 2014).

Biologists have resolved the structure of a ring of proteins used by the immune system to summon support when under attack, providing new insight into potential strategies for protection from pathogens.

The study, led by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and at UC Berkeley, used cryo-electron microscopy to capture a high-resolution image of a protein ring called an "inflammasome" as it was bound to flagellin, a protein from the whiplike tail used by bacteria to propel themselves forward.