Prehistoric Origins Of Stomach Ulcers Uncovered

Prehistoric Origins Of Stomach Ulcers Uncovered

An international team of scientists has discovered that the ubiquitous bacteria that causes most painful stomach ulcers has been present in the human digestive system since modern man migrated from Africa over 60,000 years ago. The research, published online (7 February) by the journal Nature, not only furthers our understanding of a disease causing bacteria but also offers a new way to study the migration and diversification of early humans.

Do Cigarette Warning Labels Work? Results From 4 Countries

Man-made Proteins Could Be More Useful Than Real Ones

Man-made Proteins Could Be More Useful Than Real Ones

Researchers have constructed a protein out of amino acids not found in natural proteins, discovering that they can form a complex, stable structure that closely resembles a natural protein. Their findings could help scientists design drugs that look and act like real proteins but won't be degraded by enzymes or targeted by the immune system, as natural proteins are.

'Optics On A Chip' May Revolutionize Telecom, Computing

'Optics On A Chip' May Revolutionize Telecom, Computing

In work that could lead to completely new devices, systems and applications in computing and telecommunications, MIT researchers are bringing the long-sought goal of "optics on a chip" one step closer to market.

In the January 2007 inaugural issue of the journal Nature Photonics, the team reports a novel way to integrate photonic circuitry on a silicon chip. Adding the power and speed of light waves to traditional electronics could achieve system performance inconceivable by electronic means alone.

Cold Storage Solution For Global Warming? Carbon Dioxide Could Be Frozen In Underground Reservoirs

Cold Storage Solution For Global Warming? Carbon Dioxide Could Be Frozen In Underground Reservoirs

Researchers from the University of Leicester and the British Geological Society (BGS) have proposed storing carbon dioxide in huge underground reservoirs as a way of reducing emissions- and have even identified sites in Western Europe that would be suitable.

Their research, published in the journal, Planet Earth, reveals that CO2 can be contained in cool geological aquifers or reservoirs, where it can remain harmlessly for many thousands of years.

Microprinting Technique For Patterning Single Molecules

Microprinting Technique For Patterning Single Molecules

A new process for creating patterns of individual molecules on a surface combines control of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and a soft lithography technique known as microcontact printing. Scientists use the process, known as "microcontact insertion printing" to build surfaces that have molecules with specific functions inserted at known intervals on a surface.

Secretly, We Always Knew This: Male Sweat Boosts Women's Hormone Levels

Secretly, We Always Knew This: Male Sweat Boosts Women's Hormone Levels

Just a few whiffs of a chemical found in male sweat is enough to raise levels of the stress hormone cortisol in heterosexual women, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, scientists.

The study, reported this week in The Journal of Neuroscience, provides the first direct evidence that humans, like rats, moths and butterflies, secrete a scent that affects the physiology of the opposite sex.

Horse Genome Assembled: Get Your Thoroughbred DNA Now

Horse Genome Assembled: Get Your Thoroughbred DNA Now

The first draft of the horse genome sequence has been deposited in public databases and is freely available for use by biomedical and veterinary researchers around the globe, leaders of the international Horse Genome Sequencing Project announced today. Photo of Twilight the horse. NHGRI-supported researchers have sequenced the genome of this Thoroughbred mare from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. (Courtesy of Doug Antzak, Baker Institute for Animal Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University)

Genes Involved In Coffee Quality Identified

Genes Involved In Coffee Quality Identified

Sucrose plays a vital role in coffee organoleptic quality. A team from CIRAD and the Agricultural Institute of Paraná in Brazil has recently identified the genes responsible for sucrose accumulation in coffee beans. This is a new step along the way to producing exceptional coffees. The sucrose accumulated in the beans is one of the organoleptic compounds in coffee. (Photo Credit: Pierre Marraccini, CIRAD)

Compounds Show Significant Promise Against Potential Bioweapon Toxins

Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute and the University of Wisconsin have identified two small molecules with promising activity against neurotoxins produced by the Clostridium botulinum, a compound so deadly it has been labeled one of the six highest-risk bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Because of the high cost and limited applicability of currently available treatments, the newly identified compounds have the potential to fill the existing therapy gap and to provide protection against a bioterrorism attack using the toxin.