Earth

Scientists find a way of acquiring graphene-like films from salts to boost nanoelectronics

Scientists find a way of acquiring graphene-like films from salts to boost nanoelectronics

Researchers from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), the Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (TISNCM), the National University of Science and Technology MISiS (Russia), and Rice University (USA) used computer simulations to find how thin a slab of salt has to be in order for it to break up into graphene-like layers. Based on the computer simulation, they derived the equation for the number of layers in a crystal that will produce ultrathin films with applications in nanoelectronics.

ORNL-led study analyzes electric grid vulnerabilities in extreme weather areas

ORNL-led study analyzes electric grid vulnerabilities in extreme weather areas

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., July 29, 2016 - Climate and energy scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a new method to pinpoint which electrical service areas will be most vulnerable as populations grow and temperatures rise.

Knots in chaotic waves

Knots in chaotic waves

New research, using computer models of wave chaos, has shown that three-dimensional tangled vortex filaments can in fact be knotted in many highly complex ways.

The computer experiments, by academics at the University of Bristol, give rise to a huge variety of different knots, realising many that have been tabulated by pure mathematicians working in the field of knot theory.

Researchers pinpoint abrupt onset of modern day Indian Ocean monsoon system

Researchers pinpoint abrupt onset of modern day Indian Ocean monsoon system

MIAMI--A new study by an international team of scientists reveals the exact timing of the onset of the modern monsoon pattern in the Maldives 12.9 million years ago, and its connection to past climate changes and coral reefs in the region. The analysis of sediment cores provides direct physical evidence of the environmental conditions that sparked the monsoon conditions that exist today around the low-lying island nation and the Indian subcontinent.

The discovery of new emission lines from highly charged heavy ions

The discovery of new emission lines from highly charged heavy ions

Professors Chihiro Suzuki and Izumi Murakami's research group at the National Institute for Fusion Science, together with Professor Fumihiro Koike of Sophia University, injected various elements with high atomic numbers and produced highly charged ions(*1) in LHD plasmas. By measuring the emission spectrum of the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range, they discovered a new spectral line that had not been observed experimentally in the past.

Earth's mantle appears to have a driving role in plate tectonics

Earth's mantle appears to have a driving role in plate tectonics

EUGENE, Ore. -- July 28, 2016 -- Deep down below us is a tug of war moving at less than the speed of growing fingernails. Keeping your balance is not a concern, but how the movement happens has been debated among geologists.

New findings from under the Pacific Northwest Coast by University of Oregon and University of Washington scientists now suggest a solution to a mystery that surfaced when the theory of plate tectonics arose: Do the plates move the mantle, or does the mantle move the plates.

A new leaf: Scientists turn carbon dioxide back into fuel

Argonne, Ill. (July 29, 2016) -- As scientists and policymakers around the world try to combat the increasing rate of climate change, they have focused on the chief culprit: carbon dioxide.

Produced by the burning of fossil fuels in power plants and car engines, carbon dioxide continues to accumulate in the atmosphere, warming the planet. But trees and other plants do slowly capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, converting it to sugars that store energy.

Green monkeys acquired Staphylococcus aureus from humans

Washington, DC - July 29, 2016 - Many deadly diseases that afflict humans were originally acquired through contact with animals. New research published in ASM's Applied and Environmental Microbiology shows that pathogens can also jump the species barrier to move from humans to animals. The study, that will publish July 29, shows that green monkeys in The Gambia acquired Staphylococcus aureus from humans.

In France, hiring biases slightly favor women in male-dominated STEM fields

Women enjoy a slight advantage over men when applying to become science teachers in France, a new study suggests. The results contrast with notions of a hiring bias against women in certain STEM fields, and may have implications for the debate over which interventions to pursue to increase the representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Discrimination against women during the hiring process is seen as one of the possible causes of their underrepresentation in fields including mathematics, physics and chemistry.

Production area does not affect phosphorus digestibility in soybean meal fed to pigs

  • The chemical composition of soybean meal can be dependent on the area in which soybeans are grown.

  • Soybean meal from three different growing areas in the U.S. showed no statistical differences in concentrations of phosphorus.
  • An average value for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility may be used, regardless of the area in which soybeans are grown.