Earth

Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

Scientists and engineers striving to create the next machine-age marvel--whether it be a more aerodynamic rocket, a faster race car, or a higher-efficiency jet engine--depend on reliable analysis and feedback to improve their designs.

New flexible material can make any window 'smart'

New flexible material can make any window 'smart'

AUSTIN, Texas -- Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have invented a new flexible smart window material that, when incorporated into windows, sunroofs, or even curved glass surfaces, will have the ability to control both heat and light from the sun. Their article about the new material will be published in the September issue of Nature Materials.

'Artificial atom' created in graphene

'Artificial atom' created in graphene

In a tiny quantum prison, electrons behave quite differently as compared to their counterparts in free space. They can only occupy discrete energy levels, much like the electrons in an atom - for this reason, such electron prisons are often called "artificial atoms". Artificial atoms may also feature properties beyond those of conventional ones, with the potential for many applications for example in quantum computing. Such additional properties have now been shown for artificial atoms in the carbon material graphene.

Map helps maximize carbon-capture material

Map helps maximize carbon-capture material

A careful balance of the ingredients in carbon-capture materials would maximize the sequestration of greenhouse gases while simplifying the processing -- or "sweetening" -- of natural gas, according to researchers at Rice University.

The lab of Rice chemist Andrew Barron led a project to map how changes in porous carbon materials and the conditions in which they're synthesized affect carbon capture. They discovered aspects that could save money for industry while improving its products.

New theory could lead to new generation of energy friendly optoelectronics

New theory could lead to new generation of energy friendly optoelectronics

Researchers at Queen's University Belfast and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, have created a new theoretical framework which could help physicists and device engineers design better optoelectronics, leading to less heat generation and power consumption in electronic devices which source, detect, and control light.

NASA sees Tropical Storm Fiona weakening from wind shear

NASA sees Tropical Storm Fiona weakening from wind shear

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Fiona as it was being weakened by wind shear in the Central Atlantic Ocean.

UCLA physicists discover 'apparent departure from the laws of thermodynamics'

UCLA physicists discover 'apparent departure from the laws of thermodynamics'

According to the basic laws of thermodynamics, if you leave a warm apple pie in a winter window eventually the pie would cool down to the same temperature as the surrounding air.

Scientists have created a ceramic, resistant to extreme temperatures

Scientists have created a ceramic, resistant to extreme temperatures

Physicists and technicians of the TSU and Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS are developing experimental samples of ceramics that are resistant to extreme temperatures. The scientists aim to invent a material that can withstand up to 3,000 degrees Celsius. The new product will be used in the space industry and in the manufacture of aircraft engines. Samples of the material were presented at the Second International Conference and Expo on Ceramics and Composite Materials, held 25-26 July in Berlin.

Asbestos can move in soil

A new study challenges the long-held belief that asbestos fibers cannot move through soil. The findings have important implications for current remediation strategies aimed at capping asbestos-laden soils to prevent human exposure of the cancer-causing material.

Antarctica's past shows region's vulnerability to climate change

Fresh understanding of West Antarctica has revealed how the region's ice sheet could become unstable in a warming world.

Scientists studying the region's landscape have determined how it reacted to a period of warming after the coldest point of the most recent Ice Age, some 21,000 years ago.

As the Earth warmed, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet reached a tipping point after which it thinned relatively quickly, losing 400m of thickness in 3,000 years, researchers found. This caused sea levels around the world to increase by up to two metres.