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Standard Model: Evidence of the big fix?

Standard Model: Evidence of the big fix?

There are many open questions that the Standard Model cannot answer. One of them is the smallness of the Higgs expectation value vh compared with the Planck scale. In their latest work, Dr Yuta Hamada, Dr Hikaru Kawai and Dr Kiyoharu Kawana at Kyoto University, consider the radiation S of the universe at the late stage as a function of vh, and they show that S reaches its maximum around the observed value vh = 246 GeV.

A collaboration of minds and metal

A collaboration of minds and metal

This past January, Derek Ahneman, a graduate student in the lab of Abigail Doyle, a Princeton University associate professor of chemistry, began work on an ambitious new project: he proposed the merger of two areas of research to enable a powerful reaction that neither could broadly achieve on its own.

Ghost writing the whip

Ghost writing the whip

WASHINGTON D.C., June 24, 2014 – "Ghost imaging" sounds like the spooky stuff of frivolous fiction, but it's an established technique for reconstructing hi-res images of objects partly obscured by clouds or smoke. Now a group of researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) is applying the same idea in reverse to securing stored or shared electronic data.

New technology: The goose bump sensor

New technology: The goose bump sensor

WASHINGTON D.C., June 24, 2014 – Can emotional states be measured quantitatively, and if so what would advertising, manufacturing and social media companies do with that data? Imagine a world in which a consumer's real-time physical and emotional response helped to determine his/her experience of music, online ads or the temperature in the room.

Bizarre parasite from the Jurassic

Bizarre parasite from the Jurassic

Around 165 million years ago, a spectacular parasite was at home in the freshwater lakes of present-day Inner Mongolia (China): A fly larva with a thorax formed entirely like a sucking plate. With it, the animal could adhere to salamanders and suck their blood with its mouthparts formed like a sting. To date no insect is known that is equipped with a similar specialised design. The international scientific team is now presenting its findings in the journal "eLIFE".

Grinding away at history using 'forensic' paleontology and archeology

Grinding away at history using 'forensic' paleontology and archeology

Tulsa, Ok. – The Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM) announces an unusual paper in their journal PALAIOS that combines 'forensic' paleontology and archeology to identify origins of the millstones commonly used in the 1800's. While all millstones were used similarly, millstones quarried in France were more highly valued than similar stones quarried in Ohio, USA.

MM-398 added to standard treatment shows survival benefit in mets pancreatic cancer

Source:

New method increases targeted bone volume by 30 percent

In an important development for the health of elderly people, University of Liverpool researchers have developed a new method to target bone growth.

As people age their bones lose density and, especially in women after the menopause, become more brittle. The new method developed by researchers from the University's Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease offers the possibility of more effective treatment than currently available.

Incentives as effective as penalties for slowing Amazon deforestation

The rate of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon has declined.

An international team of scientists, including one from Virginia Tech, reviewed published research about policy interventions and commodity market effects, and determined that positive incentives for farmers, counties, and states can do as much to preserve forests as public policies that call for penalties.

3-D printer for the world's largest delta?

Boulder, Colo., USA - Three main rivers -- the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna -- meet in the Bengal basin to form the world's largest delta system, which serves as a gateway between the Himalayan mountains and the vast, deep-ocean Bengal Fan. This GSA BULLETIN paper by Stephen Goodbred and colleagues presents a new understanding of how this mega-delta, the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta, came together over the past 10,000 years.

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