Earth

New model predicts once-mysterious chemical reactions

New model predicts once-mysterious chemical reactions

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 28, 2016--A team of researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Curtin University in Australia developed a theoretical model to forecast the fundamental chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen (H2), which after many decades and attempts by scientists had remained largely unpredicted and unsolved.

1815 UK geologic map remains the benchmark

1815 UK geologic map remains the benchmark

Boulder, Colorado, USA - Although most people do not regularly appreciate it, geologic maps have been and remain a critical foundation of industrial society. They are used for myriad purposes, from locating and developing natural resources, to identifying and preparing for natural hazards, to building and maintaining infrastructure.

New study shows impact of man-made structures on Louisiana's coastal wetlands

New study shows impact of man-made structures on Louisiana's coastal wetlands

MIAMI--As Louisiana's wetlands continue to disappear at an alarming rate, a new study has pinpointed the man-made structures that disrupt the natural water flow and threaten these important ecosystems. The findings have important implications for New Orleans and other coastal cities that rely on coastal wetlands to serve as buffer from destructive extreme weather events.

Crucial peatlands carbon-sink vulnerable to rising sea levels

Crucial peatlands carbon-sink vulnerable to rising sea levels

Crucial peatlands carbon-sink vulnerable to rising sea levels, research shows

Rising sea-levels linked to global warming could pose a significant threat to the effectiveness of the world's peatland areas as carbon sinks, a new study has shown.

The pioneering new study, carried out by Geographers at the University of Exeter, examined the impact that salt found in sea water has on how successfully peatland ecosystems accumulate carbon from the atmosphere.

Sparklers in super slow-motion (video)

Sparklers in super slow-motion (video)

WASHINGTON, June 28, 2016 -- As Independence Day approaches, people across the country are getting ready to celebrate with fireworks. Sparklers are a classic crowd-pleaser, and this week Reactions looks at the chemistry of these July 4th mainstays in super slow-motion. Watch as the special chemical composition of sparklers creates a prolonged, magical experience. Check it out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWBcnlMHhHQ.

Stanford researchers developing 'electronic' skin (video)

Stanford researchers developing 'electronic' skin (video)

WASHINGTON, June 27, 2016 -- The Speaking of Chemistry summer road trip continues through the Golden State. Now at Stanford, Matt Davenport and Noel Waghorn interview chemical engineer Zhenan Bao, Ph.D., and her team, who are working on materials for the future of electronics. In this video, the Stanford innovators show how they've collaborated to develop an electronic skin with applications in wearable technology and prosthetics. Check out the video here: https://youtu.be/caQ3kRmQwg8

Vegetation in Russian Arctic has memory

The permafrost regions in the Arctic are among those areas of the world in which the temperature is rising particularly fast due to climate change. However, biologists are currently observing that the tree vegetation is only minimally adapting to these changes. In those areas where pine and spruce trees should be growing according to the air temperature, the Siberian larch is still thriving.

Huge helium discovery 'safeguards future supply for MRI scanners'

Researchers have developed systematic search methods to discover one of the world's biggest helium gas fields, associated with volcanoes in the Tanzanian Rift Valley. This is the first time that helium has been found intentionally -previous finds were by accident- and opens the way for further large finds. This work is reported at the Goldschmidt conference in Yokohama, Japan.

Huge helium discovery 'a life-saving find'

A new approach to gas exploration has discovered a huge helium gas field, which could address the increasingly critical shortage of this vital yet rare element.

Helium doesn't just make your voice squeaky - it is critical to many things we take for granted, including MRI scanners in medicine, welding, industrial leak detection and nuclear energy. However, known reserves are quickly running out. Until now helium has never been found intentionally - being accidentally discovered in small quantities during oil and gas drilling.

People in hotter, poorer neighborhoods at higher risk of death during extreme heat

In Vancouver, heat exposure and social vulnerability can be a lethal combination.

New research from the University of British Columbia shows a higher risk of mortality during extreme heat events in neighbourhoods that tend to get hotter and where people tend to be poorer.