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Calcium isotope holds the secret to the mass of neutrinos

Calcium isotope holds the secret to the mass of neutrinos

Scientists around the world are being kept in suspense by the negligible mass of neutrinos, subatomic particles that could be matter and antimatter at the same time. Now, researchers from the University of Tokyo, in collaboration with a Spanish physicist, have used one of the world's most powerful computers to analyse a special decay of calcium-48, whose life, which lasts trillions of years, depends on the unknown mass of neutrinos. This advance will facilitate the detection of this rare decay in underground laboratories.

Better coffee through chemistry (video)

Better coffee through chemistry (video)

WASHINGTON, April 12, 2016 -- It's one of the most popular beverages in the world, and many of us rely on it to stay awake every day. But not every cup of coffee is created equal. From the bean to the brew, science can help you get the perfect cup. This week, Reactions goes on a quest for better coffee through chemistry. Check it out here: https://youtu.be/ml79faGQg_c.

Researchers define links within 2 supercontinents

Researchers define links within 2 supercontinents

A University of Wyoming researcher contributed to a paper that has apparently solved an age-old riddle of how constituent continents were arranged in two Precambrian supercontinents -- then known as Nuna-Columbia and Rodinia. It's a finding that may have future economic implications for mining companies.

Researchers define links within two supercontinents

Researchers define links within two supercontinents

A University of Wyoming researcher contributed to a paper that has apparently solved an age-old riddle of how constituent continents were arranged in two Precambrian supercontinents -- then known as Nuna-Columbia and Rodinia. It's a finding that may have future economic implications for mining companies.

Regional workshop held to explore submarine canyons science and management

Regional workshop held to explore submarine canyons science and management

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE - On April 7, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), a partnership among New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia, hosted a workshop for a group of leading scientists and federal agency managers to discuss the state of current science for the deepsea canyons ecosystem and existing management programs that have jurisdiction over current and potential uses related to these canyons.

Fathers plays a critical role in family values for Mexican-origin youth

Fathers plays a critical role in family values for Mexican-origin youth

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Past research has indicated that Latino families, particularly Mexican-origin families, tend to be more family oriented and place a significant emphasis on family time. New research from the University of Missouri found that a father's family values can predict family values held by Mexican-origin youth as well as family time for late adolescents. Research also indicated that the link between family time and young adults' depressive symptoms depended on parental acceptance and warmth.

Red Journal's May 2016 edition features special focus on particle therapy

The International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics' (Red Journal) May edition is a special issue focused entirely on particle therapy. It will feature papers showcasing the "best available evidence" on the value of particle therapy, as well as editorials and commentaries about its place in the radiation therapy (RT) arsenal.

Will raindrops stick to a spider web's threads?

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 12, 2016 - If you go out after a rain, you may notice spider webs glistening with water droplets. The soggy webs resemble human-made meshes for fog collection: They both have thin fibers that collect water from droplets in the air.

Now researchers from Sogang University in Seoul, South Korea have developed a model to predict whether a falling droplet will stick to a thin fiber, and how much water residue will remain on the fiber. They discuss their findings in this week's Physics of Fluids, from AIP Publishing.

The fourth dimension

Boulder, Colo., USA - Remote sensing techniques facilitate observations and monitoring of ground displacements. In particular, space-borne Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) allows accurate measurements of ground deformation by properly analyzing multi-temporal satellite acquisitions over the region of interest. However, limitations of DInSAR may arise when large and/or rapid surface deformation occurs, including those caused by active rifting.

Ames Laboratory physicists discover new material that may speed computing

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered a topological metal, PtSn4 (platinum and tin), with a unique electronic structure that may someday lead to energy efficient computers with increased processor speeds and data storage.