Earth

CORVALLIS, Ore. - People with rare diseases are at high risk for experiencing poor quality of life, including increased levels of anxiety, depression, pain, fatigue and limited ability to participate in society, a new study from an Oregon State University shows.

The study is believed to be the first large-scale study of adults living in the U.S. that are diagnosed with a rare disease or disorder, said Kathleen Bogart, an assistant professor of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts at OSU.

A study by the research group Applied Economics & Management, which is based at the University of Seville, has analysed, from a sample of the 28 countries of the European Union, the existing relationship between alcohol and road safety. Specifically, it looked at the impact both of social habits and legal regulation of alcohol consumption, such as the legislation that controls drink-driving, that is to say, the laws that dictate the maximum blood alcohol level.

A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has found that a wide range of flowers produce not just signals that we can see and smell, but also ones that are invisible such as heat.

In the hidden world of flower-pollinator interactions, heat can act not only as life-sustaining warmth, but can also be part of the rich variety of sensory signposts that flowers use to provide advertisement and information for their insect pollinators.

Speeding through the atmosphere high above Jupiter's equator is an east-west jet stream that reverses course on a schedule almost as predictable as a Tokyo train's. Now, a NASA-led team has identified which type of wave forces this jet to change direction.

Two NASA satellites provided a look at Tropical Cyclone Kai-Tak when it was moving through the central Philippines and fizzling just west of Palawan in the South China Sea.

Parents' choices about when to breed have lifelong consequences for offspring. For the sixbar wrasse, the flexibility of babies to delay their critical swim towards adulthood frees adults to spawn more often, say ecologists in a new research report in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecology.

December 18, 2017 - Researchers from the Canadian Museum of Nature and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have identified remains of a 3.5-million-year-old bear from a fossil-rich site in Canada's High Arctic. Their study shows not only that the animal is a close relative of the ancestor of modern bears--tracing its ancestry to extinct bears of similar age from East Asia--but that it also had a sweet tooth, as determined by cavities in the teeth.

Today our world is visually dominated by animals and plants, but this world would not have been possible without fungi, say University of Leeds scientists.

The researchers have carried out experiments where plants and fungi are grown in atmospheres resembling the ancient Earth, and, by incorporating their results into computer models, have shown that fungi were essential in the creation of an oxygen-rich atmosphere.

A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that songbirds may coordinate both vocally and visually to enhance their singing partners' responses.

Consumers could be eating "dirty" chlorinated turkey at Christmas if the UK agrees a post-Brexit trade deal with the USA, according to a new briefing paper by leading food policy experts.

The team - from the University of Sussex, Cardiff University and City, University of London - found US poultry, washed in up to four chemical disinfectants, does not meet EU safety standards. The academics also found the chemicals are used in the USA to wash fruit, vegetables and fish.