Earth

The total flying insect biomass decreased by more than 75 percent over 27 years in protected areas, according to a study published October 18, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Caspar Hallmann from Radboud University, The Netherlands, and colleagues.

After mating for the first time, most females of an Australian jumping spider are unreceptive to courtship by other males, and this sexual inhibition is immediate and often lasts for the rest of their lives, according to a study published October 18, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Vivian Mendez from Macquarie University, Australia, and colleagues.

A new study based on the first global survey of marine life by scuba divers has provided fresh insights into how climate change is affecting the distribution of marine life.

The research published in the journal Science Advances predicts that as the oceans warm fish - which appear to be superior predators in warm water - will extend their ranges away from the equator and cause a decline in the diversity of invertebrates such as crabs, lobsters, sea urchins and whelks.

Dolphin Diets Suggest Extreme Changes in the Ocean May Shorten Food Chains: Extreme marine conditions like El Niño are associated with shorter food chain length in the California Current ecosystem, a new analysis reports. The finding counters previous evidence for long-term stability and ecosystem resilience in nitrogen cycling and food web structure off the coast of southern California.

EUGENE, Ore. -- Oct. 18, 2017 -- The world's tropical forests are in "a critical state" in which the extinction of rare tree species could be a tipping point, say scientists who have developed an analytical method to map their biodiversity.

New research suggests that rare species of trees in rainforests may help safeguard biodiversity levels as the environment undergoes change.

The study uses new methods of computer modelling to provide more accurate estimates of the number of tree species in large areas, which scientists have tested on data from real forests and found to be better than existing methods.

The research was conducted by a team from the University of Leeds, the University of Padua, the University of Oregon and the University of Maryland.

New Rochelle, NY, Oct.18, 2017--Virotherapy capable of destroying tumor cells and activating anti-tumor immune reactions, and the use of engineered hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to deliver replacement genes that have the potential to cure blood diseases are among the key areas of gene therapy being advanced by German researchers and highlighted in a special issue of Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Power plants draw more freshwater than any other consumer in the United States, accounting for more than 50 percent of the nation's freshwater use at about 500 billion gallons daily.

To help save this water, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a new silica filter for power plant cooling waters that decreases the amount of freshwater power plants consume by increasing the number of times cooling tower water can be reused and recycled.

Healthy coral populations can produce up to 200 times more juvenile corals than degraded coral populations nearby, according to a new study in Conservation Letters. By studying one of the Caribbean's healthiest remaining coral reefs on the island of Curaçao, researchers found that healthy coral populations had a higher percentage of successful parents and each parent produced up to four times more offspring compared with corals in degraded populations. Combined with higher coral numbers overall, the healthy populations produced up 200 times more offspring per square meter of coral reef.

Water-repellent surfaces and coatings could make ice removal a literal breeze by forcing ice to grow up rather than just skate by, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and several Chinese institutions.