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Outreach: Science Marches and Media Links

ACSH - 15 hours 6 min ago

1. Now that the Science March is over, it's safe to pretend it wasn't about partisan politics. Up until Lenin's birthday...I mean Earth Day...I mean Saturday...there was at least a pretense that this was about making sure science remains a strategic resource. (1) Yes, the motivation even then was sketchy - the march had been planned to lament that science had declined before a new president even knew where the bathrooms were in the White House - but science advocates had been insisting this was not anti-Republican.

Categories: ACSH

Why Your Mom Told You Not To Cross The Road

ACSH - April 23, 2017 - 12:00am

Fourteen is a big year of transition in many kids' lives... Whether its the start of dating, getting their own phone, or learning how to drive, it is a time when they can start to do more on their own. That includes, according to new research.... crossing the street safely? 

Categories: ACSH

Kids Cannot Safely Cross Roads On Their Own

ACSH - April 23, 2017 - 12:00am

Fourteen is a big year of transition in many kids' lives... Whether its the start of dating, getting their own phone, or learning how to drive, it is a time when they can start to do more on their own. That includes, according to new research.... crossing the street safely? 

A new study from the University of Iowa shows that, before their teen years, children do not have the perceptual judgment to cross a road with traffic safely. 

Categories: ACSH

Serious Unintended Consequences of Prostate Cancer Screens and Biopsies

ACSH - April 22, 2017 - 12:00am

Last year, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) finalized a controversial recommendation that general breast cancer screening should begin at age 50, not before then. The decision was controversial not just because of its implications for health insurance coverage but because society has been conditioned to believe that screening is a valuable part of preventive medicine. Unfortunately, that's not necessarily true.

Categories: ACSH

US Female Astronaut to Break Record for Time in Space

ACSH - April 21, 2017 - 12:00am

If the "Sky's the Limit" for someone whose ambitions know no bounds, what's the limit for someone who lives above the sky?

A curious soul might like to pose that existential question to Peggy Whitson, as her stay in space reaches record-breaking heights.

Or, better yet, maybe President Trump will do it during his upcoming call with the trailblazing NASA astronaut.

Categories: ACSH

Article Saying Diet Drinks Cause Stroke, Dementia Is Full of Holes

ACSH - April 21, 2017 - 12:00am

If you just read the headlines, you'd immediately run to your pantry (or wherever you keep soft drink) and pour all your diet sodas down the sink. After all, they increase your risk of stroke and who knows what else, according to a new study just published in Stroke!

Categories: ACSH

Protecting Coral Reefs With Some Clever Chemistry

ACSH - April 21, 2017 - 12:00am

How many of these tropical fish can you name? If you're an avid snorkeler or scuba diver, probably all of them (1). Seeing them in their natural habitat - a coral reef - is an amazing experience. But, the fish that you might see in salt water aquariums (usually not these) may have gotten there in a way that is also amazing, but not in a good way.

 

Categories: ACSH

Top 10 Causes of Death Aren't Same for Men and Women

ACSH - April 20, 2017 - 12:00am

Watching an autopsy has a way of changing one's view on death. Every single one of us -- rich, poor, white, black, male, female, religious, atheist -- will one day be on a cold metallic cart with a tag on our toe. And the medical examiner will open us up, poke around, extract and weigh a few organs, then ship your lifeless corpse on to the funeral home.

Categories: ACSH

Next Plague: The Bacteria Strike Back

ACSH - April 20, 2017 - 12:00am

Bacteria were conquered, at least temporarily, when modern antibiotics arrived on the scene. But the scene has changed. The bugs are fighting back and winning, which is putting us in a dangerous mess. In this chapter of his multi-part series, "What Will the Next Plague Be?" Dr. Steve Schow examines what can happen if we don't come up with better weapons against resistant bacteria.

Categories: ACSH

Your Commute Is Affecting Your Health

ACSH - April 20, 2017 - 12:00am

If you have a long commute that consists of sitting on a bus, train or car, it may be time to think differently. A new study found that biking to work reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and all causes of mortality. So, if you want an easy way to make a big improvement in your health, jump on your bike the next time you head to work.  

Categories: ACSH

Eye-Opening Discovery Could Help Treat Jet Lag, Night-Shift Workers

ACSH - April 20, 2017 - 12:00am

English researchers have "found a new group of cells in the retina that directly affect the biological clock." It's a finding that could lead to eye medication to improve sleep patterns, providing solutions for jet-lag sufferers and drowsy, night-shift workers alike.

Categories: ACSH

The IARC Credibility Gap And How To Close It

ACSH - April 20, 2017 - 12:00am

The IARC monograph program on Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks must be reformed and brought into the 21st century – or it should be abolished

Categories: ACSH

Pollution Effects Mitigated by B Vitamins — Maybe

ACSH - April 20, 2017 - 12:00am

Recent research has forged a new reason to take B vitamin supplements — protection from the deleterious cardiovascular effects of air pollution. But the data are far from conclusive and much more work will have to support these results before their utility is proven. In the meantime, don't hold your breath.

Categories: ACSH

The Next Plague: Bacteria Make A Comeback

ACSH - April 20, 2017 - 12:00am

Bacteria were conquered, at least temporarily, when modern antibiotics arrived on the scene. But the scene has changed. The bugs are fighting back and winning, which is putting us in a dangerous mess. In this chapter of his multi-part series, "What Will the Next Plague Be?" Dr. Steve Schow examines what can happen if we don't come up with better weapons against resistant bacteria.

Categories: ACSH

Government: There Is More To Science Than Government-Funded Jobs

Science2.0 - April 19, 2017 - 7:32pm
For the better part of this century, the federal government has promoted the notion that only government-funded science is real science, and the private sector is the icky kind that, let's face it, the kind of people who overwhelmingly prefer to stay in academia dislike. (1)
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Categories: Science2.0

Government: There Is More To Science Than Government-Funded Jobs

General - April 19, 2017 - 7:32pm
For the better part of this century, the federal government has promoted the notion that only government-funded science is real science, and the private sector is the icky kind that, let's face it, the kind of people who overwhelmingly prefer to stay in academia dislike. (1)
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Categories: News

Can IARC Be Salvaged?

Science2.0 - April 19, 2017 - 3:29pm
The IARC monograph program on Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks must be reformed and brought into the 21st century – or it should be abolished

The World Health Organisation’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) monograph program is an outmoded cancer classification scheme that has remained fundamentally unchanged since the monograph program was established in the early 1970s. In the intervening 45 years, scientific understanding of cancer causation has deepened and provided decision makers with an evolving appreciation of how effects seen in laboratory animals should be used to protect human health.

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Categories: Science2.0

Can IARC Be Salvaged?

General - April 19, 2017 - 3:29pm
The IARC monograph program on Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks must be reformed and brought into the 21st century – or it should be abolished

The World Health Organisation’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) monograph program is an outmoded cancer classification scheme that has remained fundamentally unchanged since the monograph program was established in the early 1970s. In the intervening 45 years, scientific understanding of cancer causation has deepened and provided decision makers with an evolving appreciation of how effects seen in laboratory animals should be used to protect human health.

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Categories: News

Is CO2 Deadlier Than Sarin Gas? Ask a History Professor

ACSH - April 19, 2017 - 12:00am

A history professor at the University of Michigan claimed that carbon dioxide is deadlier than Sarin gas. Although it seemed implausible to the Council's chief chemist, the prof's claim was even more false than we imagined. The things you learn.

Categories: ACSH

New Antibiotic Imaging Technique Blasts Buckyballs at Bacteria

ACSH - April 19, 2017 - 12:00am

Part of the global effort to discover new antibiotics involves inventing new techniques to analyze the ones we already have. The idea is that the more we learn about how antimicrobials work at the molecular level, the easier it will be to find or synthesize novel ones.

Categories: ACSH