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Muslim Hijab Linked To Less Negative Body Image Among Women

Science2.0 - 30 min 51 sec ago

Though to Western women, Muslim women in the Mid-East and Asia seem oppressed because they have no choice in wearing a hijab, the Islamic head- and body-cover common in Muslim culture, studies have shown that Muslim women have a more positive body image.

Psychologists using a wider range of body image measures have found that British Muslim women who wear a hijab generally have more positive body image, are less reliant on media messages about beauty ideals, and place less importance on appearance than those who do not wear a hijab. These effects appear to be driven by use of a hijab specifically, rather than religiosity. 


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Categories: Science2.0

Muslim Hijab Linked To Less Negative Body Image Among Women

General - 30 min 54 sec ago

Though to Western women, Muslim women in the Mid-East and Asia seem oppressed because they have no choice in wearing a hijab, the Islamic head- and body-cover common in Muslim culture, studies have shown that Muslim women have a more positive body image.

Psychologists using a wider range of body image measures have found that British Muslim women who wear a hijab generally have more positive body image, are less reliant on media messages about beauty ideals, and place less importance on appearance than those who do not wear a hijab. These effects appear to be driven by use of a hijab specifically, rather than religiosity. 


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Categories: News

Handsome Face Linked To Lower Semen Quality

Science2.0 - 30 min 58 sec ago

It has generally been believed that more attractive men had better semen quality.


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Categories: Science2.0

Handsome Face Linked To Lower Semen Quality

General - 30 min 58 sec ago

It has generally been believed that more attractive men had better semen quality.


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Categories: News

Bamboo Could Turn The World's Construction Trade On Its Head

Science2.0 - 1 hour 32 sec ago

Bamboo can also be a tasty snack. Credit: Chris Ison/PA

By Dirk Hebel, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich

Bamboo, a common grass which can be harder to pull apart than steel, has the potential to revolutionize building construction throughout the world. But that’s not all. As a raw material found predominantly in the developing world, without a pre-existing industrial infrastructure built to skew things towards the rich world, bamboo has the potential to completely shift international economic relations.

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Categories: Science2.0

Bamboo Could Turn The World's Construction Trade On Its Head

General - 1 hour 32 sec ago

Bamboo can also be a tasty snack. Credit: Chris Ison/PA

By Dirk Hebel, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich

Bamboo, a common grass which can be harder to pull apart than steel, has the potential to revolutionize building construction throughout the world. But that’s not all. As a raw material found predominantly in the developing world, without a pre-existing industrial infrastructure built to skew things towards the rich world, bamboo has the potential to completely shift international economic relations.

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Categories: News

Weak Core Linked To More Missed Days For Baseball Pitchers

Science2.0 - 1 hour 35 sec ago

It's the home stretch of the professional baseball season and that means players are more likely to be tired or sustain an injury. New research suggests that a stronger core might help.

In the study, 347 pitchers were assessed for lumbopelvic control during spring training. Pitchers with more tilt in their pelvis as they raised a leg to step up were up to three times more likely to miss at least 30 days – cumulative, not consecutive – during the season than were pitchers who showed minimal tilt in their pelvis.  They found that professional baseball pitchers with poor core stability are more likely to miss 30 or more days in a single season because of injury than are pitchers who have good control of muscles in their lower back and pelvis. 


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Categories: Science2.0

Weak Core Linked To More Missed Days For Baseball Pitchers

General - 1 hour 35 sec ago

It's the home stretch of the professional baseball season and that means players are more likely to be tired or sustain an injury. New research suggests that a stronger core might help.

In the study, 347 pitchers were assessed for lumbopelvic control during spring training. Pitchers with more tilt in their pelvis as they raised a leg to step up were up to three times more likely to miss at least 30 days – cumulative, not consecutive – during the season than were pitchers who showed minimal tilt in their pelvis.  They found that professional baseball pitchers with poor core stability are more likely to miss 30 or more days in a single season because of injury than are pitchers who have good control of muscles in their lower back and pelvis. 


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Categories: News

Human Breast Milk - The Magic In The Microbiome

Science2.0 - 1 hour 30 min ago

Human breast milk is nutrition for infants but it also contains a large number of bacterial species, including some opportunistic pathogens of humans. 


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Categories: Science2.0

Human Breast Milk - The Magic In The Microbiome

General - 1 hour 30 min ago

Human breast milk is nutrition for infants but it also contains a large number of bacterial species, including some opportunistic pathogens of humans. 


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Categories: News

Sickle Cell Is Still A Killer But This 50 Cent Test Could Change That

Science2.0 - 2 hours 1 min ago

A simple solution to a persistent problem. Credit: Ashok A. Kumar

By Ashok A. Kumar, Harvard University

Every year, 300,000 children are born with sickle-cell disease, primarily in Africa and India.

It is a genetic disorder that causes some blood cells to become abnormally shaped. The result is that those who suffer from it have a shorter lifespan.

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Categories: Science2.0

Sickle Cell Is Still A Killer But This 50 Cent Test Could Change That

General - 2 hours 1 min ago

A simple solution to a persistent problem. Credit: Ashok A. Kumar

By Ashok A. Kumar, Harvard University

Every year, 300,000 children are born with sickle-cell disease, primarily in Africa and India.

It is a genetic disorder that causes some blood cells to become abnormally shaped. The result is that those who suffer from it have a shorter lifespan.

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Categories: News

MITOCARE: TRO40303 Hopes Dashed For Preventing Reperfusion Injury After Heart Attack

Science2.0 - 3 hours 17 min ago

 Reperfusion injury prevention isn't possible just yet. The administration of an experimental agent known as TRO40303 to patients who have had a heart attack, with the hope of preventing tissue damage when impaired blood flow is corrected (reperfusion), was disappointingly ineffective, according to results of a European study of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) presented today at ESC Congress 2014 and published in the European Heart Journal.


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Categories: Science2.0

MITOCARE: TRO40303 Hopes Dashed For Preventing Reperfusion Injury After Heart Attack

General - 3 hours 17 min ago

 Reperfusion injury prevention isn't possible just yet. The administration of an experimental agent known as TRO40303 to patients who have had a heart attack, with the hope of preventing tissue damage when impaired blood flow is corrected (reperfusion), was disappointingly ineffective, according to results of a European study of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) presented today at ESC Congress 2014 and published in the European Heart Journal.


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Categories: News

21st Century Toasters - Why Utilities Want You To Buy That Electric Car

Science2.0 - 3 hours 48 min ago
Why would anyone bake bread and then turn around and toast it?

I lived in a Pennsylvania house heated by wood. The idea of using our manual labor, in the form of wood, to toast bread was silly - but we owned an electric toaster. Somehow, being removed from the direct labor equation made toasting more acceptable, though our ancestors thought it a pastime for the idle rich.
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Categories: Science2.0

21st Century Toasters - Why Utilities Want You To Buy That Electric Car

General - 3 hours 48 min ago
Why would anyone bake bread and then turn around and toast it?

I lived in a Pennsylvania house heated by wood. The idea of using our manual labor, in the form of wood, to toast bread was silly - but we owned an electric toaster. Somehow, being removed from the direct labor equation made toasting more acceptable, though our ancestors thought it a pastime for the idle rich.
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Categories: News

Racial Disparities In Shootings - It's Easier To Shoot White People

Science2.0 - 3 hours 58 min ago

Given the recent events in Ferguson, Missouri and the highly charged claims of racism, it is no surprise that a Washington State University study of deadly force found that there is bias when it comes to skin color and being willing to pull a gun trigger on someone.

What is a surprise is that whites and Hispanic were more likely to be shot than black people.


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Categories: Science2.0

Racial Disparities In Shootings - It's Easier To Shoot White People

General - 3 hours 58 min ago

Given the recent events in Ferguson, Missouri and the highly charged claims of racism, it is no surprise that a Washington State University study of deadly force found that there is bias when it comes to skin color and being willing to pull a gun trigger on someone.

What is a surprise is that whites and Hispanic were more likely to be shot than black people.


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Categories: News

E. Coli Strain Responsible For Food Poisoning Gets Its Genome Sequenced

Science2.0 - 5 hours 14 min ago

A strain of E. coli that is a common cause of outbreaks of food poisoning in the United States has had its genome sequenced. E. coli strain EDL933 was first isolated in the 1980s but gained national attention in 1993 when it was linked to an outbreak of food poisoning from Jack-in-the-Box restaurants in the western United States.


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Categories: Science2.0

E. Coli Strain Responsible For Food Poisoning Gets Its Genome Sequenced

General - 5 hours 14 min ago

A strain of E. coli that is a common cause of outbreaks of food poisoning in the United States has had its genome sequenced. E. coli strain EDL933 was first isolated in the 1980s but gained national attention in 1993 when it was linked to an outbreak of food poisoning from Jack-in-the-Box restaurants in the western United States.


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Categories: News