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Handsome Men Do Catch More Breaks From Women

General - 28 min 38 sec ago
Women are a lot more likely to put up with misbehavior in a man if he looks like Ryan Gosling, but if he is ugly, shunning will happen much quicker, according to a paper by Jeremy Gibson and Jonathan Gore of Eastern Kentucky University, who found that a woman’s view of how law-abiding a man is can be influenced by how handsome he is.

'First impressions' are a popular field of study because of their role in forming relationships, but it is often based on physical appearance and adherence to social norms. First impressions can be misleading and when someone is getting a positive reaction, a “halo effect” it can help them in many ways. Likewise, the opposite can occur for unattractive traits.
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Antidepressants More Effective Than Assumed

Science2.0 - 1 hour 32 min ago

Many have questioned the efficacy of the common antidepressant medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

They don't work for many people, studies have found, and even when they work they lose effectiveness quickly. Psychiatric medications have also been the common denominators in tragedies like mass shootings, which has increased concern about whether or not it is better to be depressed than homicidal.


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Categories: Science2.0

Antidepressants More Effective Than Assumed

General - 1 hour 32 min ago

Many have questioned the efficacy of the common antidepressant medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

They don't work for many people, studies have found, and even when they work they lose effectiveness quickly. Psychiatric medications have also been the common denominators in tragedies like mass shootings, which has increased concern about whether or not it is better to be depressed than homicidal.


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Categories: News

Traditional Medicine: Thunder God Vine As Potential Obesity Treatment

Science2.0 - 1 hour 38 min ago

An extract from the thunder god vine, long used in traditional Chinese medicine, reduces food intake and causes up to a 45% decrease in body weight in obese mice. The weight-loss compound, called Celastrol, produces its potent effects by enhancing the action of an appetite-suppressing hormone called leptin. The findings are an early indicator that Celastrol could be developed into a drug for the treatment of obesity.


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Categories: Science2.0

Traditional Medicine: Thunder God Vine As Potential Obesity Treatment

General - 1 hour 38 min ago

An extract from the thunder god vine, long used in traditional Chinese medicine, reduces food intake and causes up to a 45% decrease in body weight in obese mice. The weight-loss compound, called Celastrol, produces its potent effects by enhancing the action of an appetite-suppressing hormone called leptin. The findings are an early indicator that Celastrol could be developed into a drug for the treatment of obesity.


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Categories: News

Emotion-sensitive Assistance Systems: Technology That Will Make You Feel Good When Helping

Science2.0 - 2 hours 13 sec ago
A new assistance system wants to help users in a wide variety of situations and it will do so by measuring user brain activity to determine whether they are pleased or displeased with system-initiated help.

NeuroLab is measuring brain activity as part of the EMOIO project that will run until the end of 2017. The project scientists use electroencephalography and functional near infrared spectroscopy to try and measure emotions, focusing on how far a combination of the two methods can improve the accuracy of classification algorithms that can enable emotion recognition in real time, during the interaction process.
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Categories: Science2.0

Emotion-sensitive Assistance Systems: Technology That Will Make You Feel Good When Helping

General - 2 hours 13 sec ago
A new assistance system wants to help users in a wide variety of situations and it will do so by measuring user brain activity to determine whether they are pleased or displeased with system-initiated help.

NeuroLab is measuring brain activity as part of the EMOIO project that will run until the end of 2017. The project scientists use electroencephalography and functional near infrared spectroscopy to try and measure emotions, focusing on how far a combination of the two methods can improve the accuracy of classification algorithms that can enable emotion recognition in real time, during the interaction process.
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Young Female Journalists Twice As Likely To Be Bullied As Men

Science2.0 - 2 hours 13 min ago
Female journalists in Norway between the ages of 25 and 35 are twice as likely to be bullied and threatened as male colleagues of the same age, and nearly half of all Norwegian journalists and editors have experienced bullying during the past five years.

25 percent have been threatened and the majority were men but there are clear gender differences to be found in online harassment, according to Aina Landsverk Hagen of KILDEN - Information Centre for Gender Research in Norway.
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Categories: Science2.0

Young Female Journalists Twice As Likely To Be Bullied As Men

General - 2 hours 13 min ago
Female journalists in Norway between the ages of 25 and 35 are twice as likely to be bullied and threatened as male colleagues of the same age, and nearly half of all Norwegian journalists and editors have experienced bullying during the past five years.

25 percent have been threatened and the majority were men but there are clear gender differences to be found in online harassment, according to Aina Landsverk Hagen of KILDEN - Information Centre for Gender Research in Norway.
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Why Sub-Zero Temperature Water Doesn't Become Ice

Science2.0 - 2 hours 47 min ago

Water behaves in mysterious ways, especially below zero before it turns into ice. Physicists have recently observed the spontaneous first steps of the ice formation process, as tiny crystal clusters as small as 15 molecules start to exhibit the recognizable structural pattern of crystalline ice.

A new study finds that liquid water does not become completely unstable as it becomes supercooled, prior to turning into ice crystals, because of an energy barrier for crystal formation in which supercooled water's compressibility continues to rise. Interestingly, liquid water becomes easier to compress, the colder it gets - unlike other substances, which become harder to compress as temperature drops.


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Categories: Science2.0

Why Sub-Zero Temperature Water Doesn't Become Ice

General - 2 hours 47 min ago

Water behaves in mysterious ways, especially below zero before it turns into ice. Physicists have recently observed the spontaneous first steps of the ice formation process, as tiny crystal clusters as small as 15 molecules start to exhibit the recognizable structural pattern of crystalline ice.

A new study finds that liquid water does not become completely unstable as it becomes supercooled, prior to turning into ice crystals, because of an energy barrier for crystal formation in which supercooled water's compressibility continues to rise. Interestingly, liquid water becomes easier to compress, the colder it gets - unlike other substances, which become harder to compress as temperature drops.


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Categories: News

New Antibody Insecticide Targets Malaria Mosquito

General - 3 hours 54 min ago

Malaria is a disabling disease that targets victims of all ages, it kills one child every minute. DDT is quite effective, and insecticide-treated bed nets also, but the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae is developing resistance to insecticides such as pyrethroid.

Genetic modification is the solution of the future, though there are clearly obstacles to that, in the form of developed world activists who scare those in developing nations about science.

Brian Foy and Jacob Meyers from Colorado State University decided to test whether antibodies targeted at a key component of the malaria mosquito's nervous system could be fed to the insects in a blood meal to kill them.


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Categories: News

New Antibody Insecticide Targets Malaria Mosquito

Science2.0 - 3 hours 54 min ago

Malaria is a disabling disease that targets victims of all ages, it kills one child every minute. DDT is quite effective, and insecticide-treated bed nets also, but the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae is developing resistance to insecticides such as pyrethroid.

Genetic modification is the solution of the future, though there are clearly obstacles to that, in the form of developed world activists who scare those in developing nations about science.

Brian Foy and Jacob Meyers from Colorado State University decided to test whether antibodies targeted at a key component of the malaria mosquito's nervous system could be fed to the insects in a blood meal to kill them.


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Categories: Science2.0

Illegal Immigration To The U.S. Caused By Globalization?

General - 3 hours 58 min ago

Many illegal aliens from Latin America risk migrating to the United States because they are fleeing from desperate situations and see opportunities to help their families, even though they will be stuck low-paying, labor-intensive jobs.


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Categories: News

Illegal Immigration To The U.S. Caused By Globalization?

Science2.0 - 3 hours 58 min ago

Many illegal aliens from Latin America risk migrating to the United States because they are fleeing from desperate situations and see opportunities to help their families, even though they will be stuck low-paying, labor-intensive jobs.


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Categories: Science2.0

Some Immune Cells Change To Prolong Inflammation

Science2.0 - 4 hours 22 min ago

Researchers have unraveled one of the mysteries of how a small group of immune cells work: That some inflammation-fighting immune cells may actually convert into cells that trigger disease. 

White blood cells, called T-cells, iare one of the body's critical disease fighters. Regulatory immune cells, called "Tregs," direct T-cells and control unwanted immune reactions that cause inflammation. They are known to produce only anti-inflammatory proteins to keep inflammation caused by disease in check.


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Categories: Science2.0

Some Immune Cells Change To Prolong Inflammation

General - 4 hours 22 min ago

Researchers have unraveled one of the mysteries of how a small group of immune cells work: That some inflammation-fighting immune cells may actually convert into cells that trigger disease. 

White blood cells, called T-cells, iare one of the body's critical disease fighters. Regulatory immune cells, called "Tregs," direct T-cells and control unwanted immune reactions that cause inflammation. They are known to produce only anti-inflammatory proteins to keep inflammation caused by disease in check.


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Categories: News

Teens, Suicide And Schools: Screening Versus Privacy

Science2.0 - 5 hours 17 min ago
A recent World Health Organization report points to depression as the leading cause of illness and disability worldwide in 10- to 19-year-olds. Suicide by teens is ranked as the third leading cause of death in this age group.

A question that comes up time and again is whether schools should be involved in screening adolescents. But many parents and students find schools' involvement in mental health to be a violation of their privacy.

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Categories: Science2.0

Teens, Suicide And Schools: Screening Versus Privacy

General - 5 hours 17 min ago
A recent World Health Organization report points to depression as the leading cause of illness and disability worldwide in 10- to 19-year-olds. Suicide by teens is ranked as the third leading cause of death in this age group.

A question that comes up time and again is whether schools should be involved in screening adolescents. But many parents and students find schools' involvement in mental health to be a violation of their privacy.

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Categories: News