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Amenhotep III: Ancient Egyptian Mummies Didn't Have Spinal Arthritis

Science2.0 - 1 hour 51 min ago

A systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families may have been another condition, according to a new study published in Arthritis&Rheumatology.

The authors refutes claims of Ankylosing spondylitis in royals like King Amenhotep III (1390–1352 BC), finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.

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Categories: Science2.0

Amenhotep III: Ancient Egyptian Mummies Didn't Have Spinal Arthritis

General - 1 hour 51 min ago

A systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families may have been another condition, according to a new study published in Arthritis&Rheumatology.

The authors refutes claims of Ankylosing spondylitis in royals like King Amenhotep III (1390–1352 BC), finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.

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Categories: News

The Resource Curse: Science Cities Suffer

Science2.0 - 3 hours 4 min ago
I just returned from the Asian Science Park Association conference in Shiraz, Iran.[1] One Science Park official asked me, “Companies in our park cannot get any cooperation from the big petrochemical firms. What can we do?”
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Categories: Science2.0

The Resource Curse: Science Cities Suffer

General - 3 hours 4 min ago
I just returned from the Asian Science Park Association conference in Shiraz, Iran.[1] One Science Park official asked me, “Companies in our park cannot get any cooperation from the big petrochemical firms. What can we do?”
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Categories: News

More Electricity In Developing Nations Had Little Impact On Climate Change

Science2.0 - October 20, 2014 - 3:30am

Without question American CO2 emissions have plummeted, even after being driven into more coal usage due to political concerns about nuclear energy. Cleaner natural gas made the difference but environmental critics say the energy emissions burden simply shifted to developing nations - poor people can't have air conditioning. 

Yet a new study in Nature Climate Change shows that environmentalists don't need to be criticizing the world's poor.  Improving household electricity access in India over the last 30 years contributed only marginally to the nation's total carbon emissions growth.   


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Categories: Science2.0

More Electricity In Developing Nations Had Little Impact On Climate Change

General - October 20, 2014 - 3:30am

Without question American CO2 emissions have plummeted, even after being driven into more coal usage due to political concerns about nuclear energy. Cleaner natural gas made the difference but environmental critics say the energy emissions burden simply shifted to developing nations - poor people can't have air conditioning. 

Yet a new study in Nature Climate Change shows that environmentalists don't need to be criticizing the world's poor.  Improving household electricity access in India over the last 30 years contributed only marginally to the nation's total carbon emissions growth.   


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Categories: News

Attention Cute Robots And Satellites Of Mars: A Comet Is Coming

Science2.0 - October 19, 2014 - 5:30pm

Image: NASA

By Monica Grady, The Open University

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Categories: Science2.0

Attention Cute Robots And Satellites Of Mars: A Comet Is Coming

General - October 19, 2014 - 5:30pm

Image: NASA

By Monica Grady, The Open University

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Categories: News

Divide And Conquer: Novel Trick Helps Rare Pathogen Infect Healthy People

Science2.0 - October 19, 2014 - 5:15pm

New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it.

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have explained how a particular strain of a fungus, Cryptococcus gattii, responds to the human immune response and triggers a 'division of labour' in its invading cells, which can lead to life-threatening infections.


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Categories: Science2.0

Divide And Conquer: Novel Trick Helps Rare Pathogen Infect Healthy People

General - October 19, 2014 - 5:15pm

New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it.

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have explained how a particular strain of a fungus, Cryptococcus gattii, responds to the human immune response and triggers a 'division of labour' in its invading cells, which can lead to life-threatening infections.


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Categories: News

New Pill-only Regimens Cure Patients With Hardest-to-treat Hepatitis C Infection

Science2.0 - October 19, 2014 - 5:15pm

(Vienna, October 17, 2014) Two new pill-only regimens that rapidly cure most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C (HCV) infection could soon be widely prescribed across Europe. Two recently-published studies1,2 confirmed the efficacy and safety of combination therapy with two oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), with around 90% of patients cured after just 12-weeks of treatment.


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Categories: Science2.0

New Pill-only Regimens Cure Patients With Hardest-to-treat Hepatitis C Infection

General - October 19, 2014 - 5:15pm

(Vienna, October 17, 2014) Two new pill-only regimens that rapidly cure most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C (HCV) infection could soon be widely prescribed across Europe. Two recently-published studies1,2 confirmed the efficacy and safety of combination therapy with two oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), with around 90% of patients cured after just 12-weeks of treatment.


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Categories: News

Antibiotics Of The Future

Science2.0 - October 19, 2014 - 5:00pm

Computer simulations show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics, focusing on the role of enzymes in the bacteria which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it working, making the bacteria resistant. 

The new findings show that it's possible to test how enzymes react to certain antibiotics and thus design new antibiotics with a much lower risk of resistance, and even to choose the best medicines for specific outbreaks.

Using QM/MM - quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations – the research team were able to gain a molecular-level insight into how enzymes called 'beta-lactamases' react to antibiotics.


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Categories: Science2.0

Antibiotics Of The Future

General - October 19, 2014 - 5:00pm

Computer simulations show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics, focusing on the role of enzymes in the bacteria which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it working, making the bacteria resistant. 

The new findings show that it's possible to test how enzymes react to certain antibiotics and thus design new antibiotics with a much lower risk of resistance, and even to choose the best medicines for specific outbreaks.

Using QM/MM - quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations – the research team were able to gain a molecular-level insight into how enzymes called 'beta-lactamases' react to antibiotics.


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Categories: News

Digital Death And The Digital Afterlife: How To Have It And How To Avoid It

Science2.0 - October 19, 2014 - 4:30pm

Image: the conversation

By David Glance, University of Western Australia

In 2012, the UK’s Sunday Times reported that actor Bruce Willis was going to sue Apple because he was not legally allowed to bequeath his iTunes collection of music to his children.

The story turned out to be false (and shockingly bad journalism) but it did start a conversation about what we can, and can’t, do with our digital possessions.

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Categories: Science2.0

Digital Death And The Digital Afterlife: How To Have It And How To Avoid It

General - October 19, 2014 - 4:30pm

Image: the conversation

By David Glance, University of Western Australia

In 2012, the UK’s Sunday Times reported that actor Bruce Willis was going to sue Apple because he was not legally allowed to bequeath his iTunes collection of music to his children.

The story turned out to be false (and shockingly bad journalism) but it did start a conversation about what we can, and can’t, do with our digital possessions.

-->

read more

Categories: News