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Why Natural Gas, Including Fracking, Is Better For The Environment Than Wind And Solar

Science2.0 - 1 hour 14 min ago
There is nothing inherently superior about natural gas from hydraulic fracturing - fracking - it has the same emissions as regular natural gas. But it is a lot lower than coal and does not have the political baggage of nuclear energy and that is why environmentalists lobbied for it over the last 40 years.
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Categories: Science2.0

Why Natural Gas, Including Fracking, Is Better For The Environment Than Wind And Solar

General - 1 hour 14 min ago
There is nothing inherently superior about natural gas from hydraulic fracturing - fracking - it has the same emissions as regular natural gas. But it is a lot lower than coal and does not have the political baggage of nuclear energy and that is why environmentalists lobbied for it over the last 40 years.
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Categories: News

Long-distance Communication From Leaves To Roots

Science2.0 - 1 hour 37 min ago

Leguminous plants are able to grow well in infertile land, and bear many beans that are important to humans. The reason for this is because most legumes have a symbiotic relationship with bacteria, called rhizobia, that can fix nitrogen in the air and then supply the host plant with ammonia as a nutrient.

The plants create symbiotic organs called nodules in their roots. However, if too many root nodules are made it will adversely affect the growth of the plants, because the energy cost of maintaining excessive nodules is too large. Therefore legumes must have a mechanism to maintain the proper number of root nodules, but this system has been poorly understood.


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Categories: Science2.0

Long-distance Communication From Leaves To Roots

General - 1 hour 37 min ago

Leguminous plants are able to grow well in infertile land, and bear many beans that are important to humans. The reason for this is because most legumes have a symbiotic relationship with bacteria, called rhizobia, that can fix nitrogen in the air and then supply the host plant with ammonia as a nutrient.

The plants create symbiotic organs called nodules in their roots. However, if too many root nodules are made it will adversely affect the growth of the plants, because the energy cost of maintaining excessive nodules is too large. Therefore legumes must have a mechanism to maintain the proper number of root nodules, but this system has been poorly understood.


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Categories: News

Neurons Express 'gloss' Using Three Perceptual Parameters

Science2.0 - 1 hour 37 min ago

Japanese researchers showed monkeys a number of images representing various glosses and then they measured the responses of 39 neurons by using microelectrodes. They found that a specific population of neurons changed the intensities of the responses linearly according to either the contrast-of-highlight, sharpness-of-highlight, or brightness of the object. This shows that these 3 perceptual parameters are used as parameters when the brain recognizes a variety of glosses. They also found that different parameters are represented by different populations of neurons. This was published in the Journal of Neuroscience (September 4, 2014 issue).


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Categories: Science2.0

Neurons Express 'gloss' Using Three Perceptual Parameters

General - 1 hour 37 min ago

Japanese researchers showed monkeys a number of images representing various glosses and then they measured the responses of 39 neurons by using microelectrodes. They found that a specific population of neurons changed the intensities of the responses linearly according to either the contrast-of-highlight, sharpness-of-highlight, or brightness of the object. This shows that these 3 perceptual parameters are used as parameters when the brain recognizes a variety of glosses. They also found that different parameters are represented by different populations of neurons. This was published in the Journal of Neuroscience (September 4, 2014 issue).


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Categories: News

Graphene Sensor Tracks Down Cancer Biomarkers

Science2.0 - 1 hour 37 min ago

An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.

The biosensor has been shown to be more than five times more sensitive than bioassay tests currently in use, and was able to provide results in a matter of minutes, opening up the possibility of a rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tool for patients.

The biosensor has been presented today, 19 September, in IOP Publishing's journal 2D Materials.


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Categories: Science2.0

Graphene Sensor Tracks Down Cancer Biomarkers

General - 1 hour 37 min ago

An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.

The biosensor has been shown to be more than five times more sensitive than bioassay tests currently in use, and was able to provide results in a matter of minutes, opening up the possibility of a rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tool for patients.

The biosensor has been presented today, 19 September, in IOP Publishing's journal 2D Materials.


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Categories: News

More Children Making Music, But Are Lessons Too Conventional?

Science2.0 - September 20, 2014 - 8:05pm

Does this count as homework? Credit: Rob Boudon, CC BY

By Mark Banks, University of Leicester

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Categories: Science2.0

More Children Making Music, But Are Lessons Too Conventional?

General - September 20, 2014 - 8:05pm

Does this count as homework? Credit: Rob Boudon, CC BY

By Mark Banks, University of Leicester

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Categories: News

Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Help Age-Related Cataracts In Men

General - September 20, 2014 - 1:01pm

Taking daily supplements of selenium and/or vitamin E appears to have no significant effect on the development of age-related cataracts in men, according to new findings from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) Eye Endpoints (SEE) Study.  

Some research, including animal studies, has suggested that dietary nutrients can have an effect on the onset and progression of cataracts. Vitamin E and selenium are of particular interest.


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Categories: News

Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Help Age-Related Cataracts In Men

Science2.0 - September 20, 2014 - 1:01pm

Taking daily supplements of selenium and/or vitamin E appears to have no significant effect on the development of age-related cataracts in men, according to new findings from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) Eye Endpoints (SEE) Study.  

Some research, including animal studies, has suggested that dietary nutrients can have an effect on the onset and progression of cataracts. Vitamin E and selenium are of particular interest.


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Categories: Science2.0

The Problem with Climate Science

RealClearScience - September 20, 2014 - 12:00pm
Categories: RealClearScience

The Duck Penis Paradox

RealClearScience - September 20, 2014 - 12:00pm
Categories: RealClearScience

Erectile Dysfunction Myth

RealClearScience - September 20, 2014 - 12:00pm
Categories: RealClearScience

The Greatest Animal War

RealClearScience - September 20, 2014 - 12:00pm
Categories: RealClearScience

In A Global Warming Future, Autumn Foliage Will Come Later, Last Longer

Science2.0 - September 19, 2014 - 11:00pm

There are few things as spectacular as flying into Pennsylvania in the autumn. The myriad vibrant colors in the trees inspire people to take jaunts into the countryside. 

That will still happen in the future, it may just come later next century, according to new research, because climate change could postpone fall leaf peeping in some areas of the United States as summer temperatures linger later into the year.

The paper birch, a popular foliage tree that is the state tree of New Hampshire, could change color one to three weeks later by the end of the century, Princeton researchers write


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Categories: Science2.0

In A Global Warming Future, Autumn Foliage Will Come Later, Last Longer

General - September 19, 2014 - 11:00pm

There are few things as spectacular as flying into Pennsylvania in the autumn. The myriad vibrant colors in the trees inspire people to take jaunts into the countryside. 

That will still happen in the future, it may just come later next century, according to new research, because climate change could postpone fall leaf peeping in some areas of the United States as summer temperatures linger later into the year.

The paper birch, a popular foliage tree that is the state tree of New Hampshire, could change color one to three weeks later by the end of the century, Princeton researchers write


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Categories: News

Could Worldwide Climate Protests Make A Difference?

Science2.0 - September 19, 2014 - 10:30pm

Is protest pointless or productive? Credit: EPA

By Olaf Corry, The Open University

It is set to be one of the largest ever coordinated protests. The People’s Climate March is due to take place in cities all over the world this weekend to try and influence the UN climate summit that follows on September 23. The marches promise to be a major global event, billed by organizers as an “unprecedented mobilization”.

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Categories: Science2.0

Could Worldwide Climate Protests Make A Difference?

General - September 19, 2014 - 10:30pm

Is protest pointless or productive? Credit: EPA

By Olaf Corry, The Open University

It is set to be one of the largest ever coordinated protests. The People’s Climate March is due to take place in cities all over the world this weekend to try and influence the UN climate summit that follows on September 23. The marches promise to be a major global event, billed by organizers as an “unprecedented mobilization”.

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Categories: News