BPA linked to disrupted sexual function in turtles

BPA linked to disrupted sexual function in turtles

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as food storage products and resins that line plastic food and beverage containers. Often, aquatic environments such as rivers and streams become reservoirs for BPA, and fish and turtle habitats are affected. Now, a collaboration of researchers from the University of Missouri, Westminster College, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Saint Louis Zoo have determined that BPA--which mimics estrogen--can alter a turtle's reproductive system and disrupts sexual differentiation.

Racial disparity in cancer mortality has narrowed

Cancer mortality remains significantly elevated among African Americans. Between 2000 and 2010, overall mortality from cancer decreased faster among African American women and men than among Caucasians. If current trends continue, racial disparities in cancer outcomes are expected to narrow further and might disappear over time.

Wind bursts may be why El Niño was El Ninot

In today's media-driven climate environment, where storms are SuperStorms and Snowpocalypses, the hype cycle had issued high expectations for the El Niño - and then little happened. On March 5, 2015, the National Weather Service finally declared a "weak" event arriving several months later than expected, formally dashing predictions that we would see a major event on par with the monster El Niño of 1997/98 that would bring much-needed rain to California and other western states.

Heavy snoring, sleep apnea may signal earlier memory and thinking decline

Heavy snoring and sleep apnea may be linked to memory and thinking decline at an earlier age, according to a new study published in Neurology. The research also suggests that treating the disorders with a breathing machine may delay the decline.

"Abnormal breathing patterns during sleep such as heavy snoring and sleep apnea are common in the elderly, affecting about 52 percent of men and 26 percent of women," said study author Ricardo Osorio, MD, with the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York.

Bird populations still reduced in Fukushima

Since a few months after the March 11, 2011, earthquake, tsunami and subsequent nuclear release at Japan's Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, Mousseau and several co-workers have undertaken a series of bird censuses in contaminated areas.

Many populations were found to have diminished in number as a result of the accident, with several species suffering dramatic declines. One hard-hit species was the barn swallow, Hirundo rustica, which suffered large population losses in a dose-dependent manner according to individually measured levels of radiation exposure.

Singular value decomposition method increases accuracy of ovarian cancer diagnosis, prognosis

Nearly anyone touched by ovarian cancer will tell you: it's devastating. It's bad enough that cancer in almost 80 percent of patients reaches advanced stages before diagnosis, and that most patients are expected to die within five years. But just as painfully, roughly one quarter of women diagnosed have no warning that they are resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy, the main line of defense, nor that they will likely have 18 months to live.

Are populations aging more slowly than we think?

Faster increases in life expectancy do not necessarily produce faster population aging, according to new research. This counterintuitive finding was the result of applying new measures of aging developed at International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) to future population projections for Europe up to the year 2050.

Complex cognition shaped the Stone Age hand axe

The ability to make a Lower Paleolithic hand axe depends on complex cognitive control by the prefrontal cortex, including the "central executive" function of working memory, a new study finds.

PLOS ONE published the results, which knock another chip off theories that Stone Age hand axes are simple tools that don't involve higher-order executive function of the brain.

Oxytocin teaches maternal brain to respond to offspring's needs

Neuroscientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have discovered how the powerful brain hormone oxytocin acts on individual brain cells to prompt specific social behaviors - findings that could lead to a better understanding of how oxytocin and other hormones could be used to treat behavioral problems resulting from disease or trauma to the brain. The findings are to be published in the journal Nature online April 15.

Iceberg armadas not the cause of North Atlantic cooling

Previous studies have suggested that pulses of icebergs may have caused cycles of abrupt climate change during the last glacial period by introducing fresh water to the surface of the ocean and changing ocean currents, which are known to play a dominant role in the climate of many of Earth's regions.

However, new findings by scientists at Cardiff University present a contradictory narrative and suggest that icebergs generally arrived too late to trigger marked cooling across the North Atlantic.