Asphalt-based carbon-capture material advances

Asphalt-based carbon-capture material advances

HOUSTON - (Sept. 12, 2016) - A Rice University laboratory has improved its method to turn plain asphalt into a porous material that can capture greenhouse gases from natural gas.

In research detailed this month in Advanced Energy Materials, Rice researchers showed that a new form of the material can sequester 154 percent of its weight in carbon dioxide at high pressures that are common at gas wellheads.

Strategy to obtain a type of amyloid-beta aggregate that may underlie neuronal death in AD

Strategy to obtain a type of amyloid-beta aggregate that may underlie neuronal death in AD

The brains of millions of people suffering from Alzheimer's disease are slowly and inescapably being depleted of neurons. However, the cause of neuronal death is still unknown. Several studies propose that the interaction of the amyloid-beta protein with the neuronal membrane causes neurotoxicity.

'Sleeper effect' accounts for durability of weak messages from credible sources

'Sleeper effect' accounts for durability of weak messages from credible sources

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- You don't need a Ph.D. in rhetoric to know that messages from a weak source - a P.T. Barnum-esque carnival barker, for example - typically don't hold much water. But according to new research co-written by a University of Illinois expert in social psychology, even the most spurious of arguments can still reverberate in the public consciousness over time, provided they are delivered by a credible source.

Study links altered brain chemistry, behavioral impairments in fish exposed to elevated CO2

Study links altered brain chemistry, behavioral impairments in fish exposed to elevated CO2

Study Links Altered Brain Chemistry, Behavioral Impairments in Fish Exposed to Elevated CO2 Research team studied damselfish behavior and physiology under ocean acidification conditions predicted for year 2300

Antibody discovery could help create improved flu vaccines

Antibody discovery could help create improved flu vaccines

BOSTON - Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators report they have discovered a type of immune antibody that can rapidly evolve to neutralize a wide array of influenza virus strains - including those the body hasn't yet encountered.

The body's ability to make the adaptable antibody suggests potential strategies for creating improved or even "universal" influenza vaccines, according to a team led by Wayne A. Marasco, MD, PhD, a cancer immunologist and virologist at Dana-Farber, reporting in the journal Nature Communications.

How to get the most from your smartphone battery (video)

How to get the most from your smartphone battery (video)

WASHINGTON, Sept. 13, 2016 -- The new iPhone is slimmer and faster than ever. But like most new generations of smartphones, its battery has pretty much stayed the same over the years. Short of carrying an external battery all the time, is there any way to extend the life of your smartphone battery? In the latest Reactions episode, we explain the chemistry of lithium-ion batteries, why they occasionally explode, and share some tips to get the most from that smartphone battery.

New tools assess the future of wind power

Stanford, CA--Using software tools developed by Near Zero, a research group hosted by the Carnegie Institution for Science's Department of Global Ecology, a team of researchers has completed the largest expert survey yet on any energy technology, in this case wind energy.

Penn research identifies brain network that controls spread of seizures

A flurry of coordinated activity in a brain-spanning network of neurons may sound like the formation of a brilliant new idea, but it is actually the description of a seizure. Understanding why and how this synchronization spreads would be a critical tool in treating severe epilepsy.

Angry drivers have a higher risk of collision, new CAMH research shows

TORONTO, Sept. 13, 2016 - Angry, aggressive drivers have much higher odds of being in a motor vehicle collision than those who don't get angry while driving, a new study by Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows.

"Even minor aggression, such as swearing, yelling or making rude gestures, can increase the risk of a collision," says lead author Dr. Christine Wickens, scientist in CAMH's Institute for Mental Health Policy Research. The study was published in Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour.

Children's willpower linked to smoking habits throughout life

Scientists from the University of Stirling have discovered a link between childhood self-control and smoking habits across life.

Behavioural Scientist Dr Michael Daly and his team examined 21,000 people from the UK tracked over four decades. The researchers found children with low self-control by age 10/11 were more likely to take up smoking in adolescence and had substantially higher rates of smoking as adults, even decades later aged 55.