How the brain improves motor control

How the brain improves motor control

Adaptation in reaching -- gradual improvement of motor control in response to a perturbation -- is a central issue in motor neuroscience.However, even the cortical origin of errors that drive adaptation has remained elusive. In a new paper published in Neuron, Inoue, Uchimura and Kitazawa have shown that error signals encoded by motor cortical neurons drive adaptation in reaching.

Why Americans waste so much food

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Even though American consumers throw away about 80 billion pounds of food a year, only about half are aware that food waste is a problem. Even more, researchers have identified that most people perceive benefits to throwing food away, some of which have limited basis in fact.

A study published today in PLOS ONE is just the second peer-reviewed large-scale consumer survey about food waste and is the first in the U.S. to identify patterns regarding how Americans form attitudes on food waste.

The Lancet Haematology: Blood disorders cost €23 billion to European economy

Healthcare costs per patient with blood cancers are two times higher than average cancer costs, due to long hospital stays and complex treatment and diagnosis.

Blood disorders cost the European economy a total of €23 billion in 2012, according to two new studies estimating the cost of malignant and non-malignant blood disorders published in The Lancet Haematology journal today.

Gene controls regeneration of injured muscle by adult stem cells

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online July 21 in Cell Reports.

The study results further suggest that this "overlooked" gene may play an important role in sarcopenia, the loss of muscle tissues with age.

Stanford researchers reveal cost-effective path to drought resiliency

Strained by drought in recent years, California desperately needs more resilient water supplies. An affordable solution that provides a wide range of benefits is within reach, according to a new Stanford study.

We're lucky climate change didn't happen sooner

There is some consolation in how the fossil fuel-induced climatic changes we increasingly experience through droughts and storm surges are playing out. It could have happened sooner, and therefore already have been much worse.

Computer model predicts how people perceive softness of 3-D printed objects

A plastic ducky produced by one 3-D printer may look the same as one produced by another printer, but it doesn't necessarily feel the same. To help designers produce copies with the same feel as well as looks of the original, researchers have developed a way to predict perceived softness and stiffness of an object.

UMMS, Curie Institute and Stanford scientists untangle Barr body of inactive X chromosome

WORCESTER, MA - Scientists at UMass Medical School, the Institut Curie in Paris and Stanford University, have taken a detailed look inside the small, densely packed structure of the inactive X chromosome found in female mammals called the Barr body and developed a model system that may be an important tool for understanding chromosome structure and gene expression.

Study identifies ways to share key data between researchers, business practitioners

Academic researchers study many aspects of business, but business practitioners rarely make use of that research. A multi-university research team reports that researchers and practitioners share more interests than either group realizes and outlines ways that the two groups can collaborate more effectively to address shared challenges.

GPS jamming: Keeping ships on the 'strait' and narrow

The University of Nottingham and Royal Norwegian Naval Academy (RNoNA) are investigating how to prevent shipping Global Positioning Signals (GPS) being jammed in potential cyberattacks that may cause vessels to go off course and collide or run aground.

Big, modern ships are highly automated with networked navigational systems, including differential GPS (DGPS) which offers more accurate positioning (to one metre) than conventional GPS.