Scientists obtain new data on the weather 10,000 years ago from sediments of a lake in Sierra Nevada

Scientists obtain new data on the weather 10,000 years ago from sediments of a lake in Sierra Nevada

A research project which counts with the participation of the University of Granada has revealed new data on the climate change that took place in the Iberian Peninsula around the mid Holocene (around 6.000 years ago), when the amount of atmospheric dust coming from the Sahara increased. The data came from a study of the sediments found in an Alpine lake in Sierra Nevada (Granada)

In pro baseball pitchers, weak core linked to more missed days

In pro baseball pitchers, weak core linked to more missed days

COLUMBUS, Ohio – New research suggests that professional baseball pitchers with poor core stability are more likely to miss 30 or more days in a single season because of injury than are pitchers who have good control of muscles in their lower back and pelvis.

Mechanical ventilation a key indicator for pre-term children's math problems

Mechanical ventilation a key indicator for pre-term children's math problems

A new study, led by researchers at the University of Warwick in the UK and the Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany, and just published in the Journal Early Human Development, has found that both the length of time spent in hospital after birth and the use of mechanical ventilation are key indicators of reduced mathematical ability in preterm children.

Muslim headscarf may buffer against negative body image among women

Researchers have found that British Muslim women who wear a hijab generally have more positive body image, are less reliant on media messages about beauty ideals, and place less importance on appearance than those who do not wear a hijab. These effects appear to be driven by use of a hijab specifically, rather than religiosity.

Throwing a loop to silence gene expression

What you eat and not just the number of calories, is a significant factor in diabetes risk

Ben-Gurion University researchers develop new program to evaluate prominent individuals' personalities

BEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL…September 2, 2014 – Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have developed a new program that automates classification of personality traits of prominent individuals -- both friend and foe -- according to a paper soon to be published in the American Intelligence Journal.

Are human breast milk microbiome 'neutral'?

Human breast milk is considered the most ideal source of nutrition for infants and it should have played a critical role in the evolution and civilizations of human beings. Unlike our intuitive perception, human milk contains a large number of bacterial species, including some opportunistic pathogens of humans. This phenomenon comes as no surprise to scientists and physicians.

Media coverage of a celebrity suicide can cause a large-scale copycat effect

Researchers who analyzed media coverage of the suicide of a national actress in South Korea and its impact on subsequent suicides found that the number of suicide-related articles surged around 80 times in the week after a suicide compared with the week prior.

Many articles (37.1%) violated several critical items on the World Health Organization suicide reporting guidelines, like containing a detailed suicide method. The investigators estimated that there were approximately 430 excess suicides during the 4 weeks after her death due to media coverage.

Report shows use of care plans in UK is rare with limited benefits

The current use of written care plans and care planning in the management of patients with long-term conditions by GPs in the UK is rare, a new study shows. This is just one of several findings of a new study published today by researchers at the Universities of Manchester, Cambridge, Keele and York.