Pop science: Stanford engineers stop soap bubbles from swirling

Pop science: Stanford engineers stop soap bubbles from swirling

The spinning rainbow surface of a soap bubble is more than mesmerizing - it's a lesson in fluid mechanics. Better understanding of these hypnotic flows could bring improvements in many areas, from longer lasting beer foam to life-saving lung treatments.

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Super Typhoon Meranti approaching Taiwan, Philippines

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Super Typhoon Meranti approaching Taiwan, Philippines

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Super Typhoon Meranti as it continued to move toward Taiwan and the northern Philippines.

Losing teeth raises older adults' risks for physical and mental disability

Losing teeth raises older adults' risks for physical and mental disability

Maintaining good oral health may help older adults prevent a variety of health problems and disabilities. However, the effect of tooth loss on physical or cognitive health and well-being is unknown.

In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers explored this connection. To do so, they examined information from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) project.

Five ways to tackle the reproducibility crisis in biomedical research

Five ways to tackle the reproducibility crisis in biomedical research

Daniel Drucker's unofficial laboratory slogan is "I'd rather be third and right, than first and wrong." As a clinician-scientist who has spent 30 years developing new drugs for diabetes, gastrointestinal disease, and obesity, he has seen high-profile journal article after article proclaim the beginning of the end for these diseases, only for the findings to never be discussed again.

Anti-tumor immunity identified with new ovarian cancer treatment strategy

Anti-tumor immunity identified with new ovarian cancer treatment strategy

PHILADELPHIA--(Sept. 13, 2016)-- Few effective treatments have been approved to treat ovarian cancer, the deadliest of all cancers affecting the female reproductive system. Now, new research from The Wistar Institute demonstrates how a drug already in clinical trials could be used to boost anti-tumor immunity and cause T-cells to target the cancer directly while minimizing side effects. The results were published in the journal Cell Reports.

Children learn quantifiers in the same order no matter what their language is

Children learn quantifiers in the same order no matter what their language is

A recent study into childhood language in 31 languages, in which UPV/EHU researchers have participated, has reached the surprising conclusion that in all the languages studied, children acquire the quantifiers in the same order, irrespective of the properties of the language in question.

NASA sees formation of Central Atlantic Tropical Storm Ian

The low pressure area known as System 94L developed into Tropical Storm Ian on Sept. 14. NOAA's GOES-East satellite data was made into an animation that showed the development of the central Atlantic storm.

Rap1, a potential new target to treat obesity

HOUSTON - (Sept. 13, 2016) - Scientists at Baylor College of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health and Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have discovered a new mechanism in the mouse brain that regulates obesity. The study, which appears in Cell Reports today, shows that this new mechanism can potentially be targeted to treat obesity.

Review article takes rare look at impact of advertising psychiatric drugs

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Advertising prescription drugs to consumers is forbidden in most of the world, but since U.S. guidelines were relaxed in 1997, such ads have become nearly ubiquitous in American media. In a newly published review, Brown University researchers examined what has been learned since then about the effect of all that advertising on psychiatric conditions. They found that the data are very limited, but what does exist suggests that ads succeed in driving prescribing with potentially mixed effects on patient care.

Adverse outcomes not improved in novel screen-and-treat program for malaria in pregnancy

A novel strategy to screen pregnant women for malaria with rapid diagnostic tests and treat the test-positive women with effective antimalarials does not lower the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with treating all pregnant women with the malaria preventive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in sub-Saharan Africa, according to an open label randomized trial published this week in PLOS Medicine by Feiko ter Kuile, of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, and colleagues.