Laser device may end pin pricks, improve quality of life for diabetics

Laser device may end pin pricks, improve quality of life for diabetics

Princeton University researchers have developed a way to use a laser to measure people's blood sugar, and, with more work to shrink the laser system to a portable size, the technique could allow diabetics to check their condition without pricking themselves to draw blood.

A NASA satellite double-take at Hurricane Lowell

A NASA satellite double-take at Hurricane Lowell

Lowell is now a large hurricane in the Eastern Pacific and NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites double-teamed it to provide infrared and radar data to scientists. Lowell strengthened into a hurricane during the morning hours of August 21.

Researchers examine impact of race and ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Researchers examine impact of race and ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Water and sunlight the formula for sustainable fuel

Water and sunlight the formula for sustainable fuel

An Australian National University (ANU) team has successfully replicated one of the crucial steps in photosynthesis, opening the way for biological systems powered by sunlight which could manufacture hydrogen as a fuel.

"Water is abundant and so is sunlight. It is an exciting prospect to use them to create hydrogen, and do it cheaply and safely," said Dr Kastoori Hingorani, from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis in the ANU Research School of Biology.

Objectification in romantic relationships related to sexual pressure and coercion

To sexually objectify a woman is to focus on her body in terms of how it can provide sexual pleasure rather than viewing her as a complete human being with thoughts and feelings. While objectification has long been considered a problem in the media, how does it affect individual romantic relationships? New research published in Psychology of Women Quarterly, a SAGE journal, finds that more objectification of a female partner's body is related to higher incidents of sexual pressure and coercion.

Primary care physicians can be critical resource for abused women in rural areas

Many primary care physicians in rural communities do not routinely screen women for intimate partner violence (IPV), according to Penn State medical and public health researchers. Rural women who are exposed to such violence have limited resources if they seek help.

USC Eye Institute study shows Native American ancestry a risk factor for eye disease

LOS ANGELES — New research led by the University of Southern California (USC) Eye Institute, part of Keck Medicine of USC, shows for the first time that Native American ancestry is a significant risk factor for vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy among Latinos with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in the United States, affecting more than 4 million Americans age 40 and older.

Novel recycling methods: The fluorescent fingerprint of plastics

Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed a new process which will greatly simplify the process of sorting plastics in recycling plants. The method enables automated identification of polymers, facilitating rapid separation of plastics for re-use.

CHEST releases new expert guidance in care of the critically ill and injured

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing (and vice versa)

Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, while feeling good in the workplace can lead to negative outcomes.

Dr. Dirk Lindebaum from the University's Management School, together with his co-author Professor Peter Jordan, developed a new line of study, and commissioned research to further explore the role of emotions in the workplace.