Explosions of Jupiter's aurora linked to planet-moon interaction

Explosions of Jupiter's aurora linked to planet-moon interaction

On Earth, bursts of particles spewed by the Sun spark shimmering auroras, like the Northern Lights, that briefly dance at our planet's poles. But, on Jupiter, there's an auroral glow all the time, and new observations show that this Jovian display sometimes flares up because of a process having nothing to do with the Sun.

Wild mountain cats threatened by habitat loss

Wild mountain cats threatened by habitat loss

Almost half of the 36 species of felids that live in the wild in the world are at threat, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Yet the lack of studies regarding their main threat, the loss and fragmentation of their habitat, limits the establishment of effective conservation strategies. These are the findings of a study which has only been able to find 162 scientific articles regarding this threat which clearly endangers the Iberian lynx.

Hepatitis B Virus exposure matures infants' immune systems

Hepatitis B Virus exposure matures infants' immune systems

Hepatitis B Virus Infection (HBV) exposure increases the immune system maturation of infants, which may give a better survival advantage to counteract bacterial infection during early life. These findings radically modify the way that HBV vertical infection of neonates (mother-to-child) is portrayed, and present a paradigm shift in the approach to treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B.

Metal worry: Manganese speeds up honey bees - and that's really, really bad

Metal worry: Manganese speeds up honey bees - and that's really, really bad

Yehuda Ben-Shahar and Eirik Søvik of Washington University in St. Louis and Andrew Barron's lab at Macquarie University in Australia, have write in Biology Letters that risk to bees is not neonics or global warming, it is instead metals.

Metals? Yes, metal from manufacturing and mining is present at levels harmful to bees, they say.

MP-MUS: Mitochondrial 'smart bomb' nukes brain cancer cells

An experimental drug that attacks brain tumor tissue by crippling the cells' energy source - the mitochondria - has passed early tests in animal models and human tissue cultures, as reported in ChemMedChem.

Greenhouse gases unbalanced

Natural wetlands usually emit methane and sequester carbon dioxide. Anthropogenic interventions, in particular the conversion of wetlands for agriculture, result in a significant increase in CO2 emissions, which overcompensate potential decreases in methane emission. A large international research team now calculated that the conversion of arctic and boreal wetlands into agricultural land would result in an additional cumulative radiative forcing of about 0,1 MilliJoule (mJ) per square meter for the next 100 years.

Females, young motorists most likely to use cell phone while driving

18 percent of drivers on academic and medical campuses use their cell phones while driving and drivers under 25 years old were 4.12 times more likely to use a cell phone while driving compared to older drivers. Females were 1.63 times more likely to use a cell phone while driving than male motorists. Unaccompanied drivers were also far more likely to use their cell phones than those who had other people in the car, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health.

Scalp cooling and the reasons for hair loss in cancer treatment

HAIR loss is a distressing side-effect of cancer treatment and can even deter some patients from undergoing life-saving chemotherapy. But researchers at the University of Huddersfield are establishing the scientific basis for a rapidly-advancing scalp cooling technology that can ensure hair retention in a vast number of cases. There is also an added benefit that the increased positivity of patients who retain their hair can help to boost their immune systems and therefore aid recovery.

Where are Britain's most extroverted, agreeable and emotionally stable regions?

There are significant differences in personalities between regions in Britain - Scots are amongst the friendliest and most co-operative residents, Londoners the most open and Welsh people are the least emotionally stable, according to analysis of surveys of just under 400,000 people from England, Wales or Scotland (Northern Ireland was excluded as sample sizes were too small), around two-thirds of whom were female.

Discovery of heat-tolerant beans could save them from global warming

Amidst fears that global warming could zap a vital source of protein that has sustained humans for centuries, bean breeders with the CGIAR global agriculture research partnership announced today the discovery of 30 new types, or lines as plant breeders refer to them, of "heat-beater" beans that could keep production from crashing in large swaths of bean-dependent Latin America and Africa.