Chinese scientists unveil liquid phase 3-D printing method using low melting metal alloy ink

Chinese scientists unveil liquid phase 3-D printing method using low melting metal alloy ink

Three-dimensional metal printing technology is an expanding field that has enormous potential applications in areas ranging from supporting structures, functional electronics to medical devices. Conventional 3D metal printing is generally restricted to metals with a high melting point, and the process is rather time consuming.

First dark matter search results from Chinese underground lab hosting PandaX-I experiment

First dark matter search results from Chinese underground lab hosting PandaX-I experiment

Scientists across China and the United States collaborating on the PandaX search for dark matter from an underground lab in southwestern China report results from the first stage of the experiment in a new study published in the Beijing-based journal SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy.

New estimates on carbon emissions triggered by 300 years of cropland expansion in Northeast China

New estimates on carbon emissions triggered by 300 years of cropland expansion in Northeast China

The conversion of forests, grasslands, shrublands and wetlands to cropland over the course of three centuries profoundly changed the surface of the Earth and the carbon cycle of the terrestrial ecosystem in Northeast China.

Half of global wildlife lost, says new WWF report

Half of global wildlife lost, says new WWF report

Washington, DC – Monday, September 29: Between 1970 and 2010 populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish around the globe dropped 52 percent, says the 2014 Living Planet Report released today by World Wildlife Fund (WWF). This biodiversity loss occurs disproportionately in low-income countries—and correlates with the increasing resource use of high-income countries.

New study finds university health schools' use of holistic admissions has positive impact

WASHINGTON, DC (September 30, 2014)— A new national study finds that health professions schools report an overall positive impact from the use of holistic review – a university admissions process that assesses an applicant's unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores. The report, Holistic Admission in the Health Professions, released today is the first large-scale study to examine the prevalence and effectiveness of holistic review across multiple health disciplines at universities nationwide.

Gut bacteria promote obesity in mice

A species of gut bacteria called Clostridium ramosum, coupled with a high-fat diet, may cause animals to gain weight. The work is published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Endoscopists recommend frequent colonoscopies, leading to its overuse

Boston, MA – A retrospective study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), has found an overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. The study demonstrated that endoscopists commonly recommended shorter follow-up intervals than established guidelines support, and these recommendations were strongly correlated with subsequent colonoscopy overuse.

Alcohol makes smiles more 'contagious,' but only for men

Consuming an alcoholic beverage may make men more responsive to the smiles of others in their social group, according to new research in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that, for men, alcohol increases sensitivity to rewarding social behaviors like smiling, and may shed light on risk factors that contribute to problem drinking among men.

Slim cigarette smokers not exposed to more harmful chemicals

A new study confirms that the exposure to tar tended to be lower for smokers of slim cigarettes than of regular cigarettes. Similarly, exposure to nicotine tended to be lower.

Genomic data could help doctors know whether to prescribe statins

Genomic data could predict whether statins will benefit a patient or not, according to an article in the open access journal Genome Biology. The research suggests that genomic data alone can explain around 15% of patients' responses to a cholesterol-lowering statin, and further studies could increase the accuracy of these predictions.