Brain scans show building blocks activate spatial ability in kids better than board games

Brain scans show building blocks activate spatial ability in kids better than board games

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Research from Indiana University has found that structured block-building games improve spatial abilities in children to a greater degree than board games.

The study, which appears in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, measured the relative impact of two games -- a structured block-building game and a word-spelling board game -- on children's spatial processing, including mental rotation, which involves visualizing what an object will look like after it is rotated.

Rare Roman gold coin found in Jerusalem at Mt. Zion archaeological dig

Rare Roman gold coin found in Jerusalem at Mt. Zion archaeological dig

The discovery of a rare gold coin bearing the image of the Roman Emperor Nero at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte's archaeological excavations on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, has just been announced by the archaeologists in charge of the project, Drs. Shimon Gibson, James Tabor, and Rafael Lewis.

"The coin is exceptional," said Gibson, "because this is the first time that a coin of this kind has turned up in Jerusalem in a scientific dig. Coins of this type are usually only found in private collections, where we don't have clear evidence as to place of origin."

Treatment could prevent neuropathy in diabetic patients

Treatment could prevent neuropathy in diabetic patients

Depleting chemical GM3 prevented type-2 diabetic mice from experiencing pain, neuropathy in feet 'Pain is a debilitating affliction and one of the worst complications of diabetes' Ongoing research is testing whether ointment that depletes GM3 and improves healing of wounds in diabetic mice is preventing or reversing neuropathy

Killing superbugs with star-shaped polymers, not antibiotics

Killing superbugs with star-shaped polymers, not antibiotics

The study, published today in Nature Microbiology, holds promise for a new treatment method against antibiotic-resistant bacteria (commonly known as superbugs).

The star-shaped structures, are short chains of proteins called 'peptide polymers', and were created by a team from the Melbourne School of Engineering.

Belief about nicotine content in cigarette may change brain activity and craving

Belief about nicotine content in cigarette may change brain activity and craving

How the brain responds to nicotine depends on a smoker's belief about the nicotine content in a cigarette, according to new research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Foam stops sloshing liquid

Foam stops sloshing liquid

WASHINGTON, D.C., September 13, 2016 -- Clinking your glass of beer often leaves its contents sloshing back and forth. Soon, though, the motion stops, your drink settles down, and you can take a sip without getting foam on your nose. It turns out that the foam helps stop the sloshing. Now, physicists have figured out why.

The analysis, published this week in Physics of Fluids, from AIP Publishing, reveals a surprising effect on the surface of the water that contradicts conventional thought and deepens our understanding of the role of capillary forces.

Online advice for preventing Alzheimer's disease often problematic: UBC research

VIDEO: How to weed out bad information online and tips on preventing Alzheimer's disease.

New UBC research finds that many online resources for preventing Alzheimer's disease are problematic and could be steering people in the wrong direction.

In a survey of online articles about preventing Alzheimer's disease, UBC researchers found many websites offered poor advice and one in five promoted products for sale--a clear conflict of interest.

Land-based food not nutritionally sufficient for wild polar bears, according to new study

A study, by San Diego Zoo Global conservationists, released this week (Sept. 12, 2016) is shedding new light on how scientists evaluate polar bear diet and weight loss during their fasting season. On average, a polar bear loses up to 30 percent of its total body mass while fasting during the open-water season.

Genes could get the jump on cane toads

A JCU scientist says slow adaptation to cold weather is delaying toad spread into the southern states.

James Cook University scientists have been using the spread of cane toads to examine genetic mechanisms that limit their range.

A team including JCU's Professor Lin Schwarzkopf, looked at the genetic processes occurring in cane toads at the limits of three invasion fronts in NSW, Western Queensland and Western Australia.

They compared this to processes occurring in toads at the centre of their range to determine the factors limiting range expansion.

Researchers criticize: Psychotropic drugs are no solution

The currently available drugs cannot permanently alleviate the symptoms of mental disorders. This is the conclusion drawn by psychologists Prof Dr Jürgen Margraf and Prof Dr Silvia Schneider from Ruhr-Universität Bochum in a commentary published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine.

Effect of drugs are only short-lived