Good networkers make prime targets

Good networkers make prime targets

Proteins are responsible for practically all vital functions in an organism. For example, they catalyze metabolic reactions, forward signals, transport particular substances and control immune system responses. Researchers established some years ago that proteins do not function independently of each other, but instead form complex networks.

Judging a fish by its color: for female bluefin killifish, love is a yellow mate

Judging a fish by its color: for female bluefin killifish, love is a yellow mate

"The only trials in which the female spent long time periods swimming near the replica was when the mate was yellow," Porfiri said. "In the presence of a yellow male, the females were actively engaged, swimming parallel to the replica and darting back and forth between the mate and the nest," he said, referring to a sheltered section of the tank.

Do ads showing sexy women make male consumers less charitable?

What happens when you use images of sexy women to attract men's attention? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, male consumers who are shown images of sexy women feel less connected to other people and are less likely to purchase products advertised as benefiting others or make charitable contributions.

Why are consumers willing to spend more money on ethical products?

What motivates consumers to make ethical choices such as buying clothing not made in a sweat shop, spending more money on fair-trade coffee, and bringing their own bags when they go shopping? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, ethical consumption is motivated by a need for consumers to turn their emotions about unethical practices into action.

Exxon Valdez 2014: Does media coverage of manmade disasters contribute to consumer complacency?

Twenty-five years ago, the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of oil into Alaska's Prince William Sound. Americans found themselves cleaning up another giant oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, news coverage of environmental disasters serves to calm our immediate anxieties instead of catalyzing changes in the way fossil fuels are used.

Can consumers use an easy trick to extend wonderful experiences and shorten bad ones?

Many experiences rarely seem to last the right amount of time. Vacations feel too short, meetings seem too long, and bad dates never seem to end. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that simply categorizing experiences can help consumers extend good experiences and shorten the bad ones.

Lucky loyalty? Devoted consumers believe they have earned the right to win random rewards

Loyal consumers can earn benefits such as frequent flyer miles or free nights at hotels when they participate in rewards programs. Loyalty, of course, doesn't increase the odds of winning random prizes or receiving random discounts. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers who have shown loyalty to a company giving a random reward mistakenly believe they are more likely to receive the reward because they deserve it.

Microbiome research shows each tree species has a unique bacterial identity

EUGENE, Ore. -- Each tree species has its own bacterial identity. That's the conclusion of University of Oregon researchers and colleagues from other institutions who studied the genetic fingerprints of bacteria on 57 species of trees growing on a Panamanian island.

More cheese, please! News study shows dairy is good for your metabolic health

This news release is available in French.

Dairy is considered part of a healthy diet and dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of 2-4 portions of milk-based products such as milk, yogurt, cheese, cream and butter.

Unraveling cell division

This news release is available in Spanish.