Understanding charge formation and transport could make Organic photovoltaic cells the future

Understanding charge formation and transport could make Organic photovoltaic cells the future

Organic photovoltaic cells, a type of solar cell that uses polymeric materials to capture sunlight, show tremendous promise as energy conversion devices, thanks to key attributes such as flexibility and low-cost production. But one giant hurdle holding back organic photovoltaic technologies have been the complexity of their power conversion processes, which involve separate charge formation and transport processes.

Review of clinical treatment of bronchiolitis in infants reveals over-reliance on one test

(Boston) – An editorial published in this week's JAMA highlights the importance of physicians using all available clinical assessment tools when considering how to treat patients. Written by Robert Vinci, MD, chief of pediatrics at Boston Medical Center and chair of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine and Howard Bauchner, MD, editor-in-chief of JAMA, the editorial examines results of a study published in the same issue of the journal as an example of how doctors can often over-emphasize certain types of data.

Growing up poor affects adults' sense of control, impulsiveness when faced with economic uncertainty

WASHINGTON - Growing up poor can influence people's sense of control and in turn may lead them to more impulsive decision-making and quickly give up on challenging tasks in uncertain situations, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Children who play violent video games at greater risk for depression

While much attention has focused on the link between violent video game playing and aggression among youths, a new study finds significantly increased signs of depression among preteens with high daily exposure to violent video games.

The details and implications of this important new study are described in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

Gender differences in experiencing orgasms

Among single adults in the U.S., women, regardless of sexual orientation, have less predictable, more varied orgasm experiences than do men, new research indicates. The study revealed that men experience orgasm during sexual activity with a familiar partner 85% of the time on average, compared with 63% of the time for women.

Targeted brain training may help you multitask better

Recycling old batteries into solar cells

In what could be a classic win-win situation, a system proposed by researchers at MIT recycles materials from discarded batteries — a potential source of lead pollution and acid rain — into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power.

Rates of heart disease and stroke continue to decline in Europe

Deaths from heart disease and stroke are declining overall in Europe, but at differing rates, according to research, published online today (Wednesday) in the European Heart Journal [1].

The ABC's of animal speech: Not so random after all

The calls of many animals, from whales to wolves, might contain more language-like structure than previously thought, according to study that raises new questions about the evolutionary origins of human language.

The study, published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, analyzed the vocal sequences of seven different species of birds and mammals and found that the vocal sequences produced by the animals appear to be generated by complex statistical processes, more akin to human language.

'Tickling' your ear could be good for your heart

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered.

A team at the University of Leeds used a standard TENS machine like those designed to relieve labour pains to apply electrical pulses to the tragus, the small raised flap at the front of the ear immediately in front of the ear canal.

The stimulation changed the influence of the nervous system on the heart by reducing the nervous signals that can drive failing hearts too hard.