Teenagers who have had a concussion also have higher rates of suicide attempts

Teenagers who have had a concussion also have higher rates of suicide attempts

TORONTO, April 15, 2014—Teenagers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury such as a concussion are at "significantly greater odds" of attempting suicide, being bullied and engaging in a variety of high risk behaviours, a new study has found.

They are also more likely to become bullies themselves, to have sought counselling through a crisis help-line or to have been prescribed medication for anxiety, depression or both, said Dr. Gabriela Ilie, lead author of the study and a post-doctoral fellow at St. Michael's Hospital.

Groundbreaking nationwide study finds that people of color live in neighborhoods with more air pollution than whites

Groundbreaking nationwide study finds that people of color live in neighborhoods with more air pollution than whites

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (04/15/2014) — A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the University of Minnesota found that on average nationally, people of color are exposed to 38 percent higher levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) outdoor air pollution compared to white people.

Preterm delivery, low birth weight and neonatal risk in pregnant women with high blood pressure

Pregnant women with chronic hypertension (high blood pressure) are highly likely to suffer from adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm delivery, low birth weight and neonatal death, which highlights a need for heightened surveillance, suggests a paper published on bmj.com today.

Chronic hypertension complicates between 1-5% of pregnancies, and the problem may be increasing because of changes in the antenatal population.

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, finds a study published on bmj.com today.

The results suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most in terms of clinically relevant growth gains, particularly for weight.

The Lancet: Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover consciousness, according to new research published in The Lancet. It is the first time that researchers have tested the diagnostic accuracy of functional brain imaging techniques in clinical practice.

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal, suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight.

Research gives new insights into rare disease of the inner ear

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear.

In the most comprehensive study of Ménière's Disease to date, researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School have been able to suggest what goes wrong in the body when people develop the disease, and provide an insight into factors that lead to its development.

Mouse model would have predicted toxicity of drug that killed 5 in 1993 clinical trial

Over 20 years after the fatal fialuridine trial, a study published this week in PLOS Medicine demonstrates that mice with humanized livers recapitulate the drug's toxicity. The work suggests that this mouse model should be added to the repertoire of tools used in preclinical screening of drugs for liver toxicity before they are given to human participants in clinical trials.

Brain changes are associated with casual marijuana use in young adults

Washington, DC — The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a study published April 16 in The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes, and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain.

Study finds new links between number of duplicated genes and adaptation

Liken it to a case of where two genes are better than one. Scientists have found a class of genes, called small-scale duplication genes, or SSDs, that are important for adapting to novel environments and surviving environmental changes.