Inheritable bacterium controls Aedes mosquitoes' ability to transmit Zika

Inheritable bacterium controls Aedes mosquitoes' ability to transmit Zika

Aedes mosquitoes carrying the bacterium Wolbachia--found inside the cells of 60 percent of all insect species--are drastically less able to transmit Zika virus, say researchers at Brazil's Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ) in a study published May 4 in Cell Host & Microbe.

The Venus flytrap: From prey to predator

The Venus flytrap: From prey to predator

The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) feeds on insects. It attracts a meal with its flower-like reddish color and ripe fruity smell on leaves converted to ambush traps. Seeking nectar, an insect will inevitably touch the highly sensitive sensory hairs on the leaves. This causes the trap to snap shut at lightning speed, imprisoning the prey.

JILA extends laser 'combing' method to identify large, complex molecules

JILA extends laser 'combing' method to identify large, complex molecules

BOULDER, Colo. - JILA physicists have extended the capability of their powerful laser "combing" technique to identify the structures of large, complex molecules of the sort found in explosives, pharmaceuticals, fuels and the gases around stars.

Equilibrium modeling increases contact lens comfort

Equilibrium modeling increases contact lens comfort

According to the Vision Council of America, roughly 75% of adults in the United States require some form of vision correction. Yet only 10% of Americans wear contact lenses. Studies estimate that one in four initial contact-users finds the lenses uncomfortable and stops wearing them. Thus, increasing the comfort level of contact lenses and expanding the market is a continual objective in the vision industry.

Newborn screening test developed for rare, deadly neurological disorder

Newborn screening test developed for rare, deadly neurological disorder

Soon after birth, a baby's blood is sampled and tested for a number of rare inherited conditions, such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia. But no such test has existed for a progressive neurodegenerative disease, called Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), that typically is not diagnosed until at least age 2, after neurological symptoms have begun to develop.

Robotic surgery just got more autonomous

Putting surgery one step closer into the realm of self-driving cars and intelligent machines, researchers show for the first time that a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery. The robot outperformed expert surgeons and current robot-assisted surgical techniques in open bowel surgery in pigs. By taking human intervention out of the equation, autonomous robots could potentially reduce complications and improve the safety and efficacy of soft tissue surgeries, about 45 million of which are performed in the U.S. each year.

Researchers identify potentially revolutionary antidepressant compound

For years, scientists and doctors have known that ketamine can treat depression very rapidly, often working within hours, compared to weeks or months for widely used antidepressants. But the drug, which is approved as an anesthetic, has major side effects - it is linked to hallucinations and dissociation - a sense of being outside your own body - and for these reasons is abused as a club drug. Not surprisingly, this limits its use in the treatment of depression.

In-patient rehab recommended over nursing homes for stroke rehab

DALLAS, May 4, 2016 -- For the first time, guidelines have been developed by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for rehabilitation after a stroke.

The contented shall inherit the Earth -- The glum? Not so much

ITHACA, N.Y. - The survival of the fittest might just be the survival of the steadfast instead. Having a positive attitude could be evolutionarily advantageous, according to Cornell researchers who simulated generations of evolution in a computational model.

Humans have faster metabolism than closely related primates, enabling larger brains

MAYWOOD, IL - Loyola University Chicago researchers are among the co-authors of a groundbreaking study that found humans have a higher metabolism rate than closely related primates, which enabled humans to evolve larger brains.

The study, published in the journal Nature, found that humans also have a higher percentage of body fat, providing the energy reserves to fuel their faster metabolism. The findings may point toward strategies for combating obesity, researchers said.