Long-term contraception in a single shot

Long-term contraception in a single shot

Caltech biologists have developed a nonsurgical method to deliver long-term contraception to both male and female animals with a single shot. The technique--so far used only in mice--holds promise as an alternative to spaying and neutering feral animals.

The approach was developed in the lab of Bruce Hay, professor of biology and biological engineering at Caltech, and is described in the October 5 issue of Current Biology. The lead author on the paper is postdoctoral scholar Juan Li.

Antioxidants cause malignant melanoma to metastasize faster

Antioxidants cause malignant melanoma to metastasize faster

Fresh research at Sahlgrenska Academy has found that antioxidants can double the rate of melanoma metastasis in mice. The results reinforce previous findings that antioxidants hasten the progression of lung cancer. According to Professor Martin Bergö, people with cancer or an elevated risk of developing the disease should avoid nutritional supplements that contain antioxidants.

Researchers gauge heritability of childhood-onset autoimmune diseases

Researchers gauge heritability of childhood-onset autoimmune diseases

Scientists have calculated more precise measurements of heritability--the influence of underlying genes--in nine autoimmune diseases that begin in childhood. The research may strengthen researchers' abilities to better predict a child's risk for associated autoimmune diseases.

Autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, collectively affect one in 12 persons in the Western Hemisphere. They represent a significant cause of chronic disability.

Beetles provide clues about the genetic foundations of parenthood

A team of researchers including scientists from the University of Georgia has identified many of the genetic changes that take place in burying beetles as they assume the role of parent. Their findings, published recently in the journal Nature Communications, may provide clues about the fundamental genetics of parenthood in insects and other animals.

Trees to power: McMaster engineers build better energy storage device

McMaster Engineering researchers Emily Cranston and Igor Zhitomirsky are turning trees into energy storage devices capable of powering everything from a smart watch to a hybrid car.

The scientists are using cellulose, an organic compound found in plants, bacteria, algae and trees, to build more efficient and longer-lasting energy storage devices or supercapacitors. This development paves the way toward the production of lightweight, flexible, and high-power electronics, such as wearable devices, portable power supplies and hybrid and electric vehicles.

High dose chemo & stem cell transplantation results in long-term survival for amyloid patients

Patients with Light-chain (AL) amyloidosis who are treated with high-dose chemotherapy (melphalan) and autologous (one's own) stem cell transplantation (HDM/SCT) have the greatest success for long-term survival.

These findings, which appear as a "Letter" in the journal Blood, (Journal of the American Society of Hematology), report on the largest number of patients in the world receiving high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation for this rare disease.

'Blind analysis' could reduce bias in social sciences papers

A course on critical thinking at the University of California, Berkeley, co-taught for the past three years by a public policy expert and a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, has generated a new proposal to remove sources of bias in research and improve confidence in published studies.

When should pediatric residents consult supervisors on issues that come up after hours?

- In most teaching hospitals, after-hours patient responsibility is covered by resident physicians, who are always able to call a supervising senior physician for advice on handling situations that may come up. But which situations require immediate consultation and which can wait until the next day can sometimes be unclear.

HIV discovery -- biomarkers predict virus return when treatment is stopped

Scientists are now better able to predict how quickly the HIV virus will return after individuals stop treatment following a discovery by researchers at UNSW Australia and the University of Oxford.

The significant development, resulting from a decade-long partnership between the two institutions and other international partners, opens up new avenues for understanding why the HIV virus persists in some patients and remains dormant and undetectable in others.

The study is published today in the prestigious journal Nature Communications.

Greenland's ice sheet plumbing system revealed

Pioneering new research sheds light on the impact of climate change on subglacial lakes found under the Greenland ice sheet.

A team of experts, led by Dr Steven Palmer from the University of Exeter, has studied the water flow paths from one such subglacial lake, which drained beneath the ice sheet in 2011.

The study shows, for the first time, how water drained from the lake - via a subglacial tunnel. Significantly, the authors present satellite observations that show that a similar event happened in 1995, suggesting that this lake fills and drains periodically.