Sugar substance 'kills' good HDL cholesterol, new research finds

Sugar substance 'kills' good HDL cholesterol, new research finds

Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered that 'good' cholesterol is turned 'bad' by a sugar-derived substance.

The substance, methylglyoxal - MG, was found to damage 'good' HDL cholesterol, which removes excess levels of bad cholesterol from the body.

Low levels of HDL, High Density Lipoprotein, are closely linked to heart disease, with increased levels of MG being common in the elderly and those with diabetes or kidney problems.

Scientists develop 'electronic nose' for rapid detection of C. diff infection

Scientists develop 'electronic nose' for rapid detection of C. diff infection

A fast-sensitive "electronic-nose" for sniffing the highly infectious bacteria C. diff, that causes diarrhoea, temperature and stomach cramps, has been developed by a team at the University of Leicester.

Geochronology and global context of the Charnian Supergroup

The Charnian Supergroup of Central England is a globally significant fossil locality where Precambrian complex life-forms are well preserved.

The Neoproterozoic Ediacaran Period was a seminal time in the evolution of multicellular life. Important among these Precambrian complex organisms were the Rangeomorphs and their possible taphomorphs (ivesheadiamorphs).

Confirmation of a low pre-extensional geothermal gradient in the Grayback normal

Many models of continental extension and rifting call upon crustal heating from magmatism or other processes to trigger and localize rifting (active rift models).

However, it is often difficult to measure the thermal structure of the crust directly for ancient rift zones, so such models have been difficult to evaluate.

Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection

Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea.

Playing the part of inspectors, the experts will have access to a wide range of sensor technologies to look for signs of whether a nuclear explosion has taken place. At the same time, other role-players representing the state under inspection will try to put them off their scent.

Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer

New research which finds that invisible blood in urine may be an early warning sign of bladder cancer is likely to shape guidelines for clinicians.

New tuberculosis blood test in children is reliable and highly specific

A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test (TAM-TB assay) is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. The test features excellent specificity, a similar sensitivity as culture tests in combination with speed of a blood test. The promising findings are a major advance for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in tuberculosis-endemic regions.

Why plants in the office make us more productive

'Green' offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than 'lean' designs stripped of greenery, new research shows.

In the first field study of its kind, published today, researchers found enriching a 'lean' office with plants could increase productivity by 15%.

The team examined the impact of 'lean' and 'green' offices on staff's perceptions of air quality, concentration, and workplace satisfaction, and monitored productivity levels over subsequent months in two large commercial offices in the UK and The Netherlands.

Doctor revalidation needs to address 7 key issues for success, claims report

New research launched today, 1st September 2014, has concluded that there are seven key issues that need to be addressed to ensure the future success of doctor revalidation, the most profound revision in medical regulation since the Medical Act of 1858.

Memory in silent neurons