Voter polls portend conflict between Obama administration and Republican leaders over ACA

Posted By News On November 28, 2012 - 10:30pm

Boston, MA – An analysis of newly released polls shows that most of those who voted for President Obama in the 2012 election favor implementing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and want the federal government to continue efforts to make sure most Americans have health insurance coverage. However, at the same time the President was re-elected, Republicans maintained a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, and 30 of the nation's 50 states will have Republican governors. The polls suggest that those who voted for these Republican officeholders, and therefore many of the Republican governors and House Republican leaders, are likely to oppose parts of the implementation of the ACA.

This analysis will be published as a Special Report on November 28, 2012 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

A large majority (78%) of Obama voters favor implementing or expanding the ACA, while 84% of those who voted for Republican candidate Mitt Romney want all or part of the law repealed. More than nine in ten Obama voters (92%) want the federal government to continue efforts to make sure most Americans have health insurance coverage, while 62% of Romney voters oppose continuing such efforts.

"While President Obama has support to implement the ACA overall, he is likely to face opposition from Republican governors and state legislators in expanding Medicaid and implementing statewide health insurance exchanges," said Robert J. Blendon, professor of health policy and political analysis at Harvard School of Public Health and co-author of the analysis. "In the House, he is likely to face Republican opposition to efforts to fix or improve upon the ACA and on budget matters."

Note: To request a copy of charts showing some of the highlights, email Marge Dwyer at mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu.

Starting with the post-election interim session of Congress, a debate will take place between President Obama, the Democratic-led Senate, and the Republican-led House about reducing the federal budget deficit. Many proposals to cut the deficit depend on large cuts in future Medicare expenditures. The poll results show that majorities of both Obama (78%) and Romney voters (68%) oppose making large Medicare cuts as a way of reducing the budget deficit.

"This gap between many political leaders in both parties and their voters is likely to make finding a permanent agreement on the fiscal issues facing the country harder than most people believe," said Blendon.

The results also show that voters viewed President Obama as better than Gov. Romney at handling health care issues. However, the President's advantage on handling health care was not as large as those held by the Democratic presidential candidates in the previous three elections.

The Republicans' are against the misnamed ACA because it will mandate a huge tax on the working class when they are in a recession, however this is not the biggest problem, the biggest problem is the claim that millions more people will get health insurance is not a cure-all, as the left seems to present their tax.
Many people will get denied services, because the funds are not there to support this massive social program, and at the same time they will be paying extremely for a flawed program/an extension of what does not work efficiently now - government controlled health "care".
This tax will be deducted from checks, by IRS, just like Social Security.
- newsmax.com/Obamacare Packs Crushing New Taxes Friday, 14 Jan 2011 “Next week, the U.S. House of Representatives will be voting on a historic repeal of the Obamacare law.
While there are many reasons to oppose this flawed government health insurance law, it is important to remember that Obamacare is also one of the largest tax increases in American history.
Below is a comprehensive list of the two dozen new or higher taxes that pay for Obamcare’s expansion of government spending and interference between doctors and patients.
Individual Mandate Excise Tax (January 2014): anyone --- not--- buying “qualifying” health insurance must pay an income surtax according to the higher of the following.
 
1 Adult
2 Adults
3+ Adults
2014
1% AGI/$95
1% AGI/$190
1% AGI/$285
2015
2% AGI/$325
2% AGI/$650
2% AGI/$975
2016+
2.5% AGI/$695
2.5% AGI/$1,390
2.5% AGI/$2,085
Exemptions for religious objectors, undocumented immigrants, prisoners, those earning less than the poverty line, members of Indian tribes, and hardship cases (determined by HHS).”

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