Science of parenting, the link between sexism and racism, death and the supernatural, and more

Posted By News On June 18, 2012 - 3:00pm

Story leads this month from new articles on parenting by the norm, the link between sexism and racism, death and the supernatural, how brands shape identity and more...

Parenting by the social norm

For parents, it is not only important to pass on to their children values that they personally endorse but also to teach values that they think are the societal norms, according to a new study. Particularly among immigrant parents, conforming to values that they perceive as norms is important. "Intersubjective Model of Value Transmission: Parents Using Perceived Norms as Reference When Socializing Children," Kim-Pong Tam (kevintam@ust.hk) et al., Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, online April 26, 2012 – forthcoming, August 2012.

When sexism increases racism

Perceived sexism negatively affects women's attitudes toward racial minorities, according to a set of three studies. In one of the experiments, White women primed with sexism expressed more pro-White bias against Blacks and Latinos. The results suggest that perceived sexism triggers a threat to social identity, leading to bias against other stigmatized groups. "Do Unto Others as Others Have Done Unto You? Perceiving Sexism Influences Women's Evaluations of Stigmatized Racial Groups," Maureen A. Craig (macraig@u.northwestern.edu) et al., Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, online May 8, 2012 – forthcoming September 2012.

Using nonverbal expressions to define social status

How do we decide who merits social status? We automatically judge people based on nonverbal expressions of emotion, for example body language showing pride or shame – and that information sometimes even overrides information about the situation, according to a new study. "(Implicitly) Judging a Book By Its Cover: The Power of Pride and Shame Expressions in Shaping Judgments of Social Status," Azim F. Shariff (shariff@uoregon.edu) et al., Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, May 18, 2012 – forthcoming, September 2012.

Death and the supernatural

Being reminded of death increases belief in supernatural higher powers among Christians, Muslims, and Agnostics, but not among atheists, according to new research. "Exploring the existential function of religion and supernatural agent beliefs among Christians, Muslims, Atheists, and Agnostics," Kenneth E. Vail III (vail.kenneth@gmail.com) et al., Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, forthcoming, October 2012.

Role of will in past and future

People tend to underweight their past failures when thinking about the prospect of future success. One reason for that, new study suggests, is that we consider our personal will to be more important in determining future events than past ones. "Whatever is Willed Will Be: A Temporal Asymmetry in Attributions to Will," Thomas Gilovich (tdg1@cornell.edu) & Erik G. Helzer, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, online June 6, 2012 – forthcoming, October 2012.

A threat to a brand as a threat to the self

When we identify with a commercial brand, we perceive a threat to the brand as a threat to the self, according to new research. Across four studies and two brands (Starbucks and Facebook), researchers measured attitude changes in participants who read negative editorials about the brands. "When a Threat to the Brand is a Threat to the Self: The Importance of Brand Identification and Implicit Self-Esteem in Predicting Defensiveness," Monika Lisjak (m-lisjak@kellogg.northwestern.edu) et al., Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, online May 18, 2012 – forthcoming, September 2012.

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