Nanoengineered Concrete Could Cut Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Nanoengineered Concrete Could Cut Carbon Dioxide Emissions

While government leaders argue about the practicality of reducing world emissions of carbon dioxide, scientists and engineers are seeking ways to make it happen.

One group of engineers at MIT decided to focus its work on the nanostructure of concrete, the world's most widely used material. The production of cement, the primary component of concrete, accounts for 5 to 10 percent of the world's total carbon dioxide emissions; the process is an important contributor to global warming.

Supercomputer Provides Super Tool For Simulation Of Cell Division

Supercomputer Provides Super Tool For Simulation Of Cell Division

Virginia Tech researchers in computer science and biology have used the university's supercomputer, System X, to create models and algorithms that make it possible to simulate the cell cycle -- the processes leading to cell division. They have demonstrated that the new mathematical models and numerical algorithms provide powerful tools for studying the complex processes going on inside living cells. System X. (Image courtesy of Virginia Tech)

Evidence For Human-caused Global Warming Is Now 'Unequivocal'

Evidence For Human-caused Global Warming Is Now 'Unequivocal'

The first major global assessment of climate change science in six years has concluded that changes in the atmosphere, the oceans and glaciers and ice caps show unequivocally that the world is warming.

Researchers On The Path To Building Bone

UAB (University of Alabama at Birmingham) researchers have developed a method to increase bone density in mice, a development that might have future benefit for humans in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone fracture. The research, published in the Jan. 29 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, involves manipulation of the Pten gene, which contributes to the process by which cells die, known as apoptosis.

Finding May Unshackle The Potential Of Composite Materials

In an advance that could lead to composite materials with virtually limitless performance capabilities, a University of Wisconsin-Madison scientist has dispelled a 50-year-old theoretical notion that composite materials must be made only of "stable" individual materials to be stable overall.

Scientists See DNA Get 'Sunburned' For The First Time

Scientists See DNA Get 'Sunburned' For The First Time

'Electric' Fish Shed Light on Ways the Brain Directs Movement

'Electric' Fish Shed Light on Ways the Brain  Directs Movement

Scientists have long struggled to figure out how the brain guides the complex movement of our limbs, from the graceful leaps of ballerinas to the simple, everyday act of picking up a cup of coffee. Using tools from robotics and neuroscience, two Johns Hopkins University researchers have found some tantalizing clues in an unlikely mode of motion: the undulations of tropical fish.

From Sheffield To Singapore, International Computing Grid Battles Malaria

From Sheffield To Singapore, International Computing Grid Battles Malaria

February 2: It's Not Just For Groundhogs Anymore

Groundhogs and other hibernators take a very sensible approach to winter: They slip into a state of suspended animation and let the worst of the cold weather pass.

The cold prompts profound physiological changes in these animals, causing their normally fast metabolism to come almost to a stop during winter. With metabolism slowed to a crawl, the animal draws on its fat stores sparingly to make it through the winter.

Decoy Pill Saves Brain Cells, May Lead To Neuroprotective Drugs For Stroke And Alzheimer's Patients

Tricking a key enzyme can soothe over-excited receptors in the brain, say neuroscientists, calling this a possible strategy against stroke, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Lead author Michel Baudry of the University of Southern California, his graduate student Wei Xu and collaborators from the University of British Columbia outline their technique in the Feb. 1 issue of Neuron.

The researchers injected laboratory mice with a decoy peptide containing a snippet of a receptor that facilitates cell death in neurodegenerative diseases.