Explaining HIV infection disparities by race/ethnicity

Posted By News On July 13, 2017 - 6:51pm

Researchers behind a new paper examined the sexual behaviors of a nationally representative group of U.S. women that can prevent against or increase risk for HIV infection and reported the differences in behaviors such as condom use and concurrent sex partners and the changes in these behaviors over 7 years for white, black, and Latina women ages 18-44.

Tiffiany Aholou, PhD, MSW and colleagues from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and ICF International, Atlanta, GA coauthored the article entitled "Sexual Risk and Protective Behaviors Among Reproductive-Aged Women in the United States."

The study of more than 13,500 women focused on three sexual risk behaviors for HIV: concurrent sex partnerships, nonmonogamous sex partners, and inconsistent condom use for either vaginal or anal sex.

The researchers reported the prevalence of each risk behavior and identified specific differences in HIV-related sexual risk behaviors depending on race/ethnicity and other sociodemographic variables such as married/single and bisexuality.

Citation: Aholou Tiffiany M., McCree Donna Hubbard, Oraka Emeka, Jeffries William L. IV, Rose Charles E., DiNenno Elizabeth, and Sutton Madeline, 'Sexual Risk and Protective Behaviors Among Reproductive-Aged Women in the United States',  Journal of Women's Health. May 2017. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2016.6224