Body

DALLAS - Jan. 4, 2018 - Sleeping sickness could use a more encompassing moniker.

An international study from the O'Donnell Brain Institute shows one of Africa's most lethal diseases is actually a circadian rhythm disorder caused by the acceleration of biological clocks controlling a range of vital functions besides sleep.

By understanding which clock genes are affected by the parasitic disease, scientists hope the research will eventually prove useful in developing new therapeutic alternatives to the current toxic treatments that are occasionally fatal to patients.

Jan. 4, 2018 - Individuals who have been treated for cancer are at risk for a complication called lymphedema: swelling in the body region where lymph nodes were removed, causing pain and limited function. New research and insights on the management of cancer-related lymphedema are presented in the January special issue of Rehabilitation Oncology, official journal of the Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association.

(Boston)--An international team of researchers has developed a novel compound that successfully inhibits growth of melanoma cells by targeting specific epigenetic modifying proteins in these cells.

A team of researchers in Italy and Austria has determined that a drug approved to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be less effective in a particular subset of patients.

The New Year is an excellent time to make resolutions for a healthier lifestyle - but by the end of the first week of January, even the best intentions may start to pall.

But research published this week in ecancermedicalscience may provide the motivation needed to stick with it - those hard-won healthy choices may lead to a total reduction of about one-third in cancer risk.

Researchers led by Professor Peter Elwood of Cardiff University, UK examined preliminary data from the UK Biobank, a prospective study of half a million subjects.

DURHAM, N.C. -- Scleroderma with internal organ involvement is a debilitating and lethal autoimmune disorder with few effective treatments. But a study led by Duke Health researchers has found new cause for optimism using an aggressive stem cell transplant regimen.

New clinical trial findings show that a therapeutic regimen involving transplantation of a person's own blood-forming stem cells can improve survival and quality of life for people with severe scleroderma, a life-threatening autoimmune Adisease. The regimen, known as myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), includes chemotherapy and total body radiation to destroy the bone marrow followed by transplantation of the person's own blood-forming stem cells to reconstitute the marrow and immune system.

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England have accepted hundreds of payments from drug companies that they have not disclosed to patients and the public, reveals an investigation by The BMJ today.

Publicly declared payments include tickets to top sports matches and a Beyoncé concert. Yet only two thirds of the 4,600 payments - and a quarter of the value - that CCGs accepted from private companies and charities in 2015-16 and 2016-17 were listed in registers or declarations published by them.

The impact of pay for performance programs in US hospitals has been "limited and disappointing" say experts in a study published by The BMJ today.

Their findings show that care for older patients was no better at hospitals that had been operating under pay for performance programs for more than a decade compared with those which had only been under financial incentives for less than three years.

And they add that pay for performance programs as currently implemented are unlikely to be successful in the future, even if their timeframes are extended.

The idea that sugar could be a fundamental cause of the global obesity and diabetes epidemics, with deleterious effects on the human body that go beyond just empty calories, should be considered seriously again, argues journalist and author Gary Taubes in The BMJ today.

In the midst of such a huge public health crisis, Taubes says "we must do more to discourage consumption while we improve our understanding of sugar's role.