Body

COLUMBUS, Ohio - A strong social network could be the key to preserving memory.

New research from The Ohio State University found that mice housed in groups had better memories and healthier brains than animals that lived in pairs.

The discovery bolsters a body of research in humans and animals that supports the role of social connections in preserving the mind and improving quality of life, said lead researcher Elizabeth Kirby, an assistant professor of behavioral neuroscience and member of the Center for Chronic Brain Injury at Ohio State.

Increased physical activity, not weight loss, gives individuals with coronary heart disease a longer lease on life, according to a new study conducted at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

NTNU researchers have found that heart disease patients can gain weight without jeopardizing their health, but sitting in their recliner incurs significant health risks.

Boston, MA - The mortality rate in Puerto Rico rose by 62% [95% confidence interval (CI) 11% to 114%] after Hurricane Maria, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study was conducted in January and February 2018, in collaboration with colleagues from Carlos Albizu University in Puerto Rico and the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

DALLAS - May 30, 2018 - Building on two decades of research, investigators at UT Southwestern have determined that "cellular housekeeping" can extend the lifespan and healthspan of mammals.

A study jointly led by Drs. Salwa Sebti and Álvaro Fernández, postdoctoral researchers in the Center for Autophagy Research, found that mice with persistently increased levels of autophagy - the process a cell uses to dispose of unwanted or toxic substances that can harm cellular health - live longer and are healthier. The study, published online today, is found in Nature.

NCI-MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice), the largest precision medicine trial of its kind, achieves a milestone with the release of results from three treatment arms of the trial at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2018 annual meeting. Spokespersons are available for interviews.

Among women planning to conceive after a pregnancy loss, those who had sufficient levels of vitamin D were more likely to become pregnant and have a live birth, compared to women with insufficient levels of the vitamin, according to an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. This study appears in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Women who are obese and who have been metabolically healthy for decades are still at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared to metabolically healthy women of normal weight, according to an observational study that followed over 90000 American women for up to 30 years, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal.

The findings indicate that obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, regardless of whether or not women develop any of the common metabolic diseases such as high blood pressure or type 2 diabetes.

In a statement published in the European Respiratory Journal, a coalition of respiratory doctors and scientists from six continents have warned of the dangers posed to children and adolescents by electronic cigarettes [1].

They say there is mounting evidence that e-cigarettes damage health and are highly addictive, yet manufacturers are marketing them as "healthier" cigarettes and their popularity among young people is growing.

New guidance has been published on managing diabetes in the elderly, including for the first time how to manage treatment for the particularly frail.

The guidance was produced from a collaboration between experts in diabetes medicine, primary care and geriatric medicine, led by Dr David Strain at the University of Exeter Medical School.

It will advise clinicians on helping elderly people with type 2 diabetes get the most out of treatment options, and for the first time contains guidance on how and when to stop diabetes treatments in particularly frail adults.