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NEW YORK, NY (February 9, 2018)--Continuous low doses of far ultraviolet C (far-UVC) light can kill airborne flu viruses without harming human tissues, according to a new study at the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). The findings suggest that use of overhead far-UVC light in hospitals, doctors' offices, schools, airports, airplanes, and other public spaces could provide a powerful check on seasonal influenza epidemics, as well as influenza pandemics.

The study was published online today in Scientific Reports.

Young adults who were undernourished as preschool children were approximately twice as likely to suffer from hearing loss as their better- nourished peers, a new study suggests. The study, led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, analyzed the relationship between the hearing of more than 2,200 young adults in Nepal and their nutritional levels as children 16 years earlier.

New Rochelle, NY, February 8, 2018--Talking to patients with chronic and serious illnesses about their life goals and bucket-lists can help clinicians present treatment options and participate in informed decision-making with a clearer understanding of the potential impact of medical treatments.

NEW YORK (February 8, 2018) - The Veterans Health Administration, the largest integrated healthcare system in the United States, is leading efforts to prevent the spread of dangerous multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs), as detailed in a series of articles published in the February issue of Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

A new approach tested by researchers at the University of Iowa shows that de-identified data from a "smart thermometer" connected to a mobile phone app can track flu activity in real time at both population and individual levels and the data can be used to significantly improve flu forecasting. The findings are published online Feb. 8 in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Philadelphia, February 8, 2018 - A new study published in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics has established that hybrid-capture sequencing is the method of choice for sequencing "actionable" gene mutations across the most common forms of lymphoid cancer.

A new study from the University of Sheffield has shown a new blood test could provide a clue as to why some patients are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease risk after suffering a heart attack.

The research may help scientists to identify new targets for reducing the risk and eventually lead to more effective treatments.

Obesity continues to be growing problem in the developed world, and Norway, where one in four people is overweight, is no exception.

A recent study helps illuminate why it can be so difficult to maintain a healthy weight after substantial weight loss. The study, just published in the American Journal of Physiology, Endrocrinology and Metabolism, studied appetite in patients who participated in a comprehensive 2-year weight loss program, and found clues as to why maintaining weight loss long term is so difficult.

For physicians, asking patients about their bucket lists, or whether they have one, can encourage discussion about making their medical care fit their life plans, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

A bucket list is a list of things you'd like to do before you die, like visiting Paris or running a marathon. It's a chance to think about the future and put lifelong dreams or long-term goals down on a piece of paper.

DALLAS, Feb. 8, 2018 -- Many aspects of strokes affect women and men differently, and four articles in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke highlight recent research and identify future research needs.