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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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GPM satellite probes soaking storms in Southern Texas and the Gulf

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Southern Texas and the western Gulf of Mexico is getting a soaking because of a low pressure system. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western Gulf of Mexico and measured the rainfall from the system.
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DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical research

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Researchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into DNA barcodes -- labels used in a wide range of biological experiments -- yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future.
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Martian dust storm grows global: Curiosity captures photos of thickening haze

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
A storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. The Martian dust storm has grown in size and is now officially a 'planet-encircling' (or 'global') dust event.
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Researchers identify method to diagnose cancer in patients with early onset diabetes

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer can develop elevated blood sugar levels up to three years before their cancer diagnosis, according to the results of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published the journal Gastroenterology.
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A mix of in-person and online learning may boost student performance, reduce anxiety

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Before online learning existed, the traditional lecture was the only option for college courses. Students who skipped class risked missing valuable information. Researchers found that online content accompanied by weekly class meetings -- a 'blended' course format -- may improve performance in students at risk for failing. In addition, fewer students withdrew from the blended format class. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis.
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New medicare model produces expert nurses to address shortage of primary care

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
In an article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania researchers call for modernizing the way Medicare pays for training nurses, and highlight a successful new model of cost-effectively training more advanced practice nurses to practice community-based primary care.
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Learning about the Himalayas using Mars technology

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
he Himalayan Range includes some of the youngest and most spectacular mountains on Earth, but the rugged landscape that lends it the striking beauty for which it is known can also keep scientists from fully understanding how these mountains formed. 'We know more about the rocks on parts of Mars than we do about some of the areas in the Himalaya,' said Dr. Alka Tripathy-Lang.
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New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic hands

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Engineers have created an electronic 'skin' in an effort to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetics.
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In mice, stem cells seem to work in fighting obesity! What about stem cells in humans?

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
This release aims to summarize the available literature in regard to the effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells transplantation on obesity and related comorbidities from the animal model. This helpful to justify going forward with clinical trials for stem cell regimens for a possible future application in humans.
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Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cages

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
In a paper published in Nature, a team led by Uli Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University, reports discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures -- 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.
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The world's tiniest first responders

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Amid the rise of CRISPR and genome editing, scientists are still learning more about DNA repair and its significance in aging and diseases such as cancer.
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How physics explains the evolution of social organization

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
A scientist at Duke University says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities exhibiting distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas -- a concept called the constructal law.
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Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
A team of University of Chicago scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extremely high temperatures and pressures. The computational measurements, published June 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, should help scientists understand water's role in the makeup of the mantle and potentially in other planets.
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Cell-free DNA profiling informative way to monitor urinary tract infections

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Using shotgun DNA sequencing, Cornell University researchers have demonstrated a new method for monitoring urinary tract infections (UTIs) that surpasses traditional methods in providing valuable information about the dynamics of the infection as well as the patient's biological response.
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Emergency department patients want to be invited to share in medical decision-making

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Most emergency department patients want to be involved in some aspects of medical decision-making, but they need to be invited.
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Medicaid work requirements and health savings accounts may impact people's coverage

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Current experimental approaches in Medicaid programs -- including requirements to pay premiums, contribute to health savings accounts, or to work -- may lead to unintended consequences for patient coverage and access, such as confusing beneficiaries or dissuading some people from enrolling, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animals, U of G study finds

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
University of Guelph researchers found residues of the insecticides in the livers of wild turkeys, providing evidence that this common agrochemical is being ingested by free-ranging animals.
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Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
An international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
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The seed that could bring clean water to millions

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
Carnegie Mellon University's Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton's former student and co-author Stephanie Velegol, uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations.
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Rare in-vivo study shows weak brain nodes have strong influence on memory network

Jun 20 2018 - 00:06
The majority of existing simulation studies show that the parts of the brain with high connectivity, the so-called 'hubs', are most important when it comes to several different cognitive tasks. But the results of a rare in-vivo study by Gino Del Ferraro of The City College of New York recently published in Nature demonstrates that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) -- a part of the brain with weak connections -- plays an unexpectedly influential role in enhancing the memory network.
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