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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Updated: 14 min 36 sec ago

Math can predict how cancer cells evolve

14 hours 23 min ago
Applied mathematics can be a powerful tool in helping predict the genesis and evolution of different types of cancers, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.
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Declining trust in facts, institutions imposes real-world costs on US society, RAND report finds

14 hours 23 min ago
Americans' reliance on facts to discuss public issues has declined significantly in the past two decades, leading to political paralysis and collapse of civil discourse.
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Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

14 hours 23 min ago
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.
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Shale gas is one of the least sustainable ways to produce electricity, research finds

14 hours 23 min ago
Shale gas is one of least sustainable options for producing electricity, according to new research from The University of Manchester.
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Power stations in cells may protect brain against Parkinson's

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
Impairment in mitochondria may actually protect the brain in Parkinson's disease.
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New record at ultracold neutron source in Mainz

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
Researchers at Mainz University installed an update to their ultracold neutron source. Now the prerequisites are in place that are needed to begin the more sensitive measurements required to determine the lifetime of the free neutron.
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Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'Golden Spike'

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
Anthropocene Working Group led by University of Leicester scientists and invited specialists review the potential settings where a global reference section for the Anthropocene might be searched.
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European cities could avoid up to 10,000 premature deaths by expanding cycling networks

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
A study led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has found that expanding designated cycling networks in cities could provide considerable health and economic benefits.
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HKBU scholars develop new technology to decode gene transcription

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
A research team from the School of Chinese Medicine (SCM) of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has developed the world's first model framework and 'LogicTRN' algorithm to accurately establish a gene regulatory route to analyse the genetic function and understand the biological processes.
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Researchers propose new gas-solid reaction for high-speed perovskite photodetector

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
The gas-solid reaction method provides a full coverage of the perovskite film and avoids the damage from the organic solvent, which is beneficial for the light capture and electrons transportation, resulting in a faster response time and stability for the perovskite photodetector.
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Danish researchers reveal how the MRSA bacterium handles stress

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
An international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results eventually can be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms.
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Confined movements: How cells form tubes in confined spaces

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
A team of scientists from Singapore and France, led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck, Principal Investigator at the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the National University of Singapore, has described a novel 'microtube'-based platform to study how tubular organs, such as the heart and the kidneys, form under the various topographical restrictions commonly experienced inside the body.
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Named after Stanley Kubrick, a new species of frog is a 'clockwork orange' of nature

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
Two new frog species were discovered in the Amazon Basin. Both had been previously misidentified as another superficially identical species. One of them received a name translating to 'demon' or 'devil' in allusion to the horn-like projections visible on its eyelids. The second one was named in honor of famous American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, because of his masterpiece A Clockwork Orange. The amphibians are described in the open access journal ZooKeys.
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Mysteries of a promising spintronic material revealed

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
 Researchers at UC Riverside used an unconventional approach to determine the strength of the electron spin interactions with the optical phonons in antiferromagnetic nickel oxide (NiO) crystals.
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Cellular seismology: Putting vibrations on the map

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
Using a unique technology called 'cell quake elastography,' scientists can now map to the millisecond the elasticity of components vibrating inside a cell. This discovery published in PNAS this week by Guy Cloutier and his team from CRCHUM, Université de Montréal and INSERM, opens up a whole new field of research in mechanobiology, opening the door to many practical applications in medicine.
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The Fields Medal fallacy: Why this math prize should return to its roots

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
The Fields Medal, whose origins date back to the 1930s, will be issued again this year in August to up to four of the world's most accomplished mathematicians under the age of 40. In a commentary for Nature, Michael Barany, a Society of Fellows post-doctoral fellow in history at Dartmouth, proposes that the Fields Medal return to its roots as a tool intended to shape the future of mathematics, rather than recognizing those who have already found the spotlight.
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New blood test for diagnosing heart attacks: A 'big deal,' with caveats

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
A longtime blood test that measures the likelihood of a cardiac event has become more sensitive and more precise. Why doctors and patients should be cautiously optimistic.
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Rising obesity rates in south leading to rapid increase in diabetes cases

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
Rising obesity rates in several Southern states are leading to a rapid increase in new cases of diabetes among both black and white adults. A new study helmed by investigators at the University of Texas Health Science Center and Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) found the risk of diabetes is double for black patients.
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Study: Pulsating dissolution found in crystals

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
When German researchers zoomed in to the nanometer scale on time-lapse images of dissolving crystals, they found a surprise: Dissolution happened in pulses, marked by waves that spread just like ripples on a pond.
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New study on the impact of relatedness on grandmothers' desire to care for grandchildren

Jan 15 2018 - 00:01
Historically, grandmothers have been important to their grandchildren, and the help provided by grandmothers has increased grandchild survival during the times of high child mortality. However, there have been signs that in many populations, the impact of maternal grandmothers and paternal grandmothers on their grandchildren has been different. A recent study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that X-chromosome relatedness between grandmothers and their grandchildren did not affect grandchild survival in the 18th and 19th century Finland.
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