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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Ultrafast electron oscillation and dephasing monitored by attosecond light source

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Collaborative research team of Prof. Jun Takeda and Associate Prof. Ikufumi Katayama in the laboratory of Yokohama National University (YNU) and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) successfully observed petahertz (PHz: 1015 of a hertz) electron oscillation. The periodic electron oscillations of 667-383 attoseconds (as: 10-18 of a second) is the fastest that has ever been measured in the direct time-dependent spectroscopy in solid-state material.
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Republicans more persuasive than scientists on climate change

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Regardless of political affiliation, people are more likely to believe facts about climate change when they come from Republicans speaking against what has become a partisan interest in this country, says a new UConn study.
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Transplanted livers help body defend against organ rejection, Mayo Clinic study finds

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
When patients undergo a dual kidney-liver transplant, the liver has a protective effect on the kidney, the study found.
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A molecular atlas of calcific aortic valve disease

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
A team of researchers from BWH has comprehensively analyzed gene expression and protein distribution in human aortic valves obtained from valve replacement surgery. Their results are published in Circulation.
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Many European countries are not ready to stop viral hepatitis

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Many European countries lack a comprehensive policy to eliminate viral hepatitis as a major public health threat, according to a patient group-based survey implemented in 25 countries. The Hep-CORE study was coordinated by ISGlobal -- an institution supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation -- and led by the European Liver Patient's Association.
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Ebola media coverage impacted how the public perceived the disease and survivors

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that news coverage of Ebola during the time it was in the US focused on telling individual stories to humanize those affected. Based on these findings, the researchers suggest that reporters covering health crises might have a greater positive impact on their audiences if they write human interest stories that share helpful information.
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NYITCOM at A-State professor lends anatomy expertise to solve ancient mystery

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Scientists have long wondered why the physical traits of Neanderthals, the ancestors of modern humans, differ greatly from today's man. Now, a research team led by a professor at the University of New England in Australia, with the aid of an anatomy and fluid dynamics expert at NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine at Arkansas State University (NYITCOM at A-State), may have the answer.
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Study: Coal mining reduces abundance, richness of aquatic life

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Coal mining, under current US regulations, has significantly reduced the abundance and variety of fish, invertebrates, salamanders, and other aquatic life in streams, according to a new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
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Brain scans may help diagnose neurological, psychiatric disorders

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
A new study shows that individual brain networks are remarkably stable from day to day and while undertaking different tasks, suggesting that they could potentially form the basis of diagnostic tests for brain disorders or diseases.
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For young adults with blood cancer, pediatric centers may improve survival

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Adolescents and young adults with acute leukemia have a survival advantage if they receive treatment at a pediatric cancer center versus an adult center, according to a new study.
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Researchers find the brain processes sight and sound in same manner

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Georgetown neuroscientists have found that the human brain learns to make sense of auditory and visual stimuli in the same two-step process.
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One step closer to understanding explosive sensitivity with molecule design

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Explosives have an inherent problem -- they should be perfectly safe for handling and storage but detonate reliably on demand.
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Having fully stocked cart to treat malignant hyperthermia during labor not cost-beneficial

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Maintaining a stocked cart, with a full supply of the life-saving drug dantrolene, to treat malignant hyperthermia, a rare but potentially fatal adverse reaction to general anesthesia, may not be cost-beneficial in hospital maternity units where the incidence of the reaction is low, according to a new paper published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).
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Water dynamics indicate tumor status

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
How aggressive is a tumor? To measure the tumor status without taking tissue samples, Italian researchers have developed a method based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of whole body parts. The technique measures proton nuclear resonance dispersion profiles at low magnetic fields, which reveals the water exchange rate of the tumor cells. Thus, tumor development can be monitored rapidly and noninvasively, say the authors of the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
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Study suggests we can recognize speakers only from how faces move when talking

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Results of a new study by cognitive psychologist and speech scientist Alexandra Jesse and her linguistics undergraduate student Michael Bartoli at the University of Massachusetts Amherst should help to settle a long-standing disagreement among cognitive psychologists about the information we use to recognize people speaking to us. The study shows that listeners can use visual dynamic features to learn to recognize who is talking.
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Great Welsh science helps solve pollinator puzzle

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
Welsh scientists piecing together the giant jigsaw puzzle of plant pollination are a step closer to knowing how it all fits thanks to a new paper by Swansea University Ph.D. researcher Andrew Lucas.
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Portable device to sniff out trapped humans

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
The first step after buildings collapse from an earthquake, bombing or other disaster is to rescue people who could be trapped in the rubble. But finding entrapped humans among the ruins can be challenging. Scientists now report in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry the development of an inexpensive, selective sensor that is light and portable enough for first responders to hold in their hands or for drones to carry on a search for survivors.
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Pepper plant sops up personal care product antibiotic

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
It sometimes can be hard to find toothpastes, soaps and other toiletries without antibiotics. Their popularity has caused an increase in environmental levels of antimicrobial substances, such as triclocarban (TCC), which end up in the water and soil used to grow crops. Scientists report in the ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that TCC and related molecules can end up in food, with potentially negative health effects.
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Electromagnetic wizardry: Wireless power transfer enhanced by backward signal

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
An international research team has proposed a way to increase the efficiency of wireless power transfer over long distances and tested it with numerical simulations and experiments. To achieve this, they beamed power between two antennas, one of which was excited with a back-propagating signal of specific amplitude and phase. The new development will improve wireless power transmission. This study also offers new approaches to wireless communication, where external conditions can change unpredictably.
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Stemming the tide of ocean plastics

Apr 18 2018 - 00:04
As people in the developing countries become more affluent, they end up buying more plastics. But these areas often don't have good waste management procedures in place, so a lot of that plastic eventually ends up in the ocean, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
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