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Secular And Longitudinal Trends In Young Female Dieting Strategies - 30 Year Study

July 30, 2014 - 3:30am

Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB) finds that the younger a woman is when she goes on her first diet, the more likely she is to experience several negative health outcomes later in life. 


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Sugary Beverages In Adolescence Impair Memory

July 30, 2014 - 2:00am

Some critics go after sucrose, and some go after fructose, but new research at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB) says it's all bad; daily consumption of beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup or sucrose were shown to impair the ability to learn and remember information, particularly when consumption occurs during adolescence.


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Prehistoric Dairy Farming At Extreme Latitudes

July 30, 2014 - 1:30am

Before there was a war on wheat and a war on sugar, there was a war on dairy products. Nutritionists need science insight the most and are least likely to want it, they instead listen to Yogic flying instructors, actresses and Food Babes at conferences embracing the latest fad.


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DXL Instrument Settles Interstellar Helium Debate

July 30, 2014 - 1:06am

New findings have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky. Thanks to refurbished detectors first flown on a NASA sounding rocket in the 1970s, astronomers have now confirmed the long-held suspicion that much of this glow stems from a region of million-degree interstellar plasma known as the local hot bubble, or LHB. 

At the same time, the study also establishes upper limits on the amount of low-energy, or soft, X-rays produced within our planetary system by the solar wind, a gusty outflow of charged particles emanating from the sun. 


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Mike Massimino, The First Tweeting Astronaut, Leaves NASA For Academia

July 29, 2014 - 9:42pm
Mission Accomplished. Now it's time to go back home.

After two space shuttle missions and almost two decades, astronaut Mike Massimino has left NASA for Columbia University in New York. During the final servicing mission of the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, Massimino became the first astronaut to tweet from space, and he now has nearly 1.3 million followers.
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We Can Predict Audience Reaction To TV Programming

July 29, 2014 - 8:34pm

Marketing experts have long wanted a reliable method of forecasting responses to products and messages.

A study that analyzed the brain responses of 16 individuals says even a few people can be a remarkably strong predictor of the preferences of large TV audiences, up to 90 percent in the case of Super Bowl commercials.

This is far superior to the wobbly claims made by psychology surveys. 


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Quantum Cheshire Cat: Scientists Separate A Particle From Its 'Grin'

July 29, 2014 - 6:04pm

In Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland", the Cheshire Cat could disappear but its grin remained.  Why? Who knows? Like dogs named Checkers and Esther Williams swimming pools, things don't always make sense. Scientifically, that cat was an object separated from its properties - it was a quantum cat.


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Achalasia Esophagus Disease Is Autoimmune

July 29, 2014 - 5:01pm

Achalasia is a rare disease, affecting 1 in 100,000 people, characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall and manifested as chest pain during eating, weight loss, and regurgitation of food.

When we swallow, a sphincter in the lower esophagus opens, allowing food to enter the stomach. Nerve cells in the esophageal wall control the opening and closing of this sphincter, but in people with achalasia, these nerve cells gradually disappear. Without these cells, the esophageal sphincter fails to relax, causing food to accumulate in the esophagus. This results in the swallowing problems, regurgitation, vomiting, nighttime coughing, chest pain and weight loss. 


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Virtual Water Shortage By 2040

July 29, 2014 - 5:01pm

Two new papers postulate that there will be a water crisis by 2040. Not because of population, but because of current energy and power solutions.  And they believe solar and wind power is the only answer.

 In most countries, electricity is the biggest source of water consumption because the power plants need cooling cycles in order to function and that is why the scholars from Aarhus University in Denmark, Vermont Law School and CNA Corporation, a federally-funded research center for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, advocate solar and wind energy over existing technology.


Credit: Aarhus University


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Teach For America Efforts Show School Board Politics Alive And Well

July 29, 2014 - 3:59pm

Teach For America is a group that recruits recent college graduates to teach in poorer public schools for two years, the idea being that they would be better than substitute teachers in those districts. Education unions dislike the organization and call them 'scabs' - because they are non-union labor.

Now, Teach for America is setting its sights on capturing school board seats across the nation. They are never going to win over an education union that wants to protect tenure and jobs, but if they win the school board, their goal of reforming education may succeed


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First Grade Reading Suffers In Minority Neighborhood Schools

July 29, 2014 - 3:23pm

Beginning in 1969, a court decision, motivated by a lack of racial integration in schools, led to students being shipped to schools in other neighborhoods. As part of a political campaign against Richard Nixon, his political opposition latched onto this forced busing and school desegregation to show they cared about minorities more. The trade-off was that kids were no longer in their own neighborhoods and felt like pawns in a culture war.


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Water Vapor Is The Most Abundant Greenhouse Gas

July 29, 2014 - 11:00am

Though many people believe that CO2 is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, that honor actually goes to water vapor. NASA has been saying for years that water vapor is the biggest amplifier in global warming, perhaps double the effect of CO2,  and a new study from scientists at the University of Miami confirms rising levels of water vapor in the upper troposphere will intensify climate change impacts over the next decades.


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NFL Players: Here Is The Best Time To Sign A Contract

July 29, 2014 - 11:00am
In the NFL. there is a salary cap and while money in contracts can be guaranteed, the contract itself is not. For people outside the US this makes no sense but basically every contract has a bonus, which is guaranteed, and then an annual salary, which is not. A team can waive a player and the money of the bonus counts 'against the cap' while the annual salary is prorated.
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Evidence Of Man At The South Pole Before Roald Amundsen Arrived In 1911

July 29, 2014 - 2:25am

The South Pole is the spot in Antarctica at 90 degrees S, where the surface of the earth intersects the axis of rotation. Except for inside the United States Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, there is no plant or animal life.

Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen arrived in 1911 but evidence of man had already beat him there - in the form of industrial air pollution that arrived long before any human.


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Running Was Never As Great As Once Claimed, But Not As Bad As Now Said Either

July 29, 2014 - 12:00am

Running was once a big health fad. Like red wine and chocolate on the miracle side, or wheat and sugar on the panic side, mainstream media is happy to build up fads so they can tear them down later.

Modern stories revolve around people dropping dead from running but you are a lot less likely to die running, even if for only a few minutes a day at slow speed, than you are sitting around eating Doritos.


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Forget 20 Foot Sea Rise Hype, Nuisance Flooding Will Get Action Taken

July 28, 2014 - 11:37pm

8 of the top 10 U.S. cities that have seen an increase in nuisance flooding, which causes road closures, overwhelmed storm drains and compromised infrastructure, are on the East Coast, according to a new NOAA technical report.


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African Rice Sequenced: A Genome To Feed The World

July 28, 2014 - 10:29pm

Credit: University of Arizona

Researchers have sequenced the complete genome of Oryza glaberrima (African rice), which will enhance scientists' and agriculturalists' understanding of the growing patterns of African rice, as well as enable the development of new rice varieties that are better able to cope with increasing environmental stressors to help solve global hunger challenges.


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For People At Risk Of Suicide, The Internet Is A Blessing And A Curse

July 28, 2014 - 10:00pm
There are websites that encourage anorexia, there are websites that glorify stepping on animals with high heels and killing them, so it is no surprise that there are websites that glorify suicide. There are also websites that can talk people down from the ledge. In a free Internet, they can both be found rather easily.

An upcoming paper looked for information on suicides using popular search engines (Google, Bing) in Austria and the USA and found that protective information is significantly more plentiful than harmful information, about 2:1. 
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Endurance Runners: In Warm Regions, Heat Stroke 10X More Likely To Kill You Than Heart Attacks

July 28, 2014 - 9:34pm

Since emerging from the primordial ooze, organic life has been doing unnatural things in defiance of nature. Nothing is as unnatural as endurance running but sentient beings like to push boundaries.

Endurance running is impressive, but it is risky. There are calls for pre-participation electrocardiogram (ECG) screenings because of an alarming number of sudden death occurrences in athletes. including undetected heart disease in a young and seemingly healthy people, but it turns out heart attack is not the greatest health risk for runners, as is commonly believed. 


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Astrocytes, The Brain's Lesser Known Cells, Get Some Cognitive Respect

July 28, 2014 - 9:08pm

When something captures your interest, like this article, unique electrical rhythms called gamma oscillations sweep through your brain.

These gamma oscillations reflect a symphony of cells—both excitatory and inhibitory—playing together in an orchestrated way. Though their role has been debated, gamma waves have been associated with higher-level brain function, and disturbances in the patterns have been tied to schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, autism, epilepsy and other disorders.

Now, new research from the Salk Institute shows that little known supportive cells in the brain known as astrocytes may in fact be major players that control these waves.

 


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