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Doing Good Deeds Helps Socially Anxious People Relax

July 6, 2015 - 9:32pm

Being busy with acts of kindness can help people who suffer from social anxiety to mingle more easily, according to a new stud. 

Sufferers from social anxiety are more than just a little shy. Dealings with others might make them feel so threatened or anxious that they often actively avoid socializing. Although this protects them from angst and possible embarrassment, they lose out on the support and intimacy gained from having relationships with others. They have fewer friends, feel insecure when interacting with others, and often do not experience emotional intimacy even in close relationships.


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Parton Distribution Functions For Run 2 At The LHC

July 6, 2015 - 7:12pm
When you create an energetic collision between two protons, as the Large Hadron Collider does at large rates and very high energy, the question is what is the chance that a rare process is generated. In the quantum world, everything that is possible is also mandatory - but it happens with a probability that is sometimes very hard to calculate.  -->

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Two Techniques Of Temporal Migraine Surgery 'Equally Effective'

July 6, 2015 - 1:30pm

Two migraine surgery techniques targeting a specific "trigger site" are both highly effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine headaches, according to a randomized trial.

Patients with temporal-type migraine derive similar and significant improvement from techniques that relieve pressure on (decompression) or remove a portion of (neurectomy) the nerve responsible for triggering their headaches, reports Bahman Guyuron, MD, Emeritus professor of plastic surgery at Case School of Medicine, Cleveland, and colleagues. 


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Pollution Helps Trees Fight Infection

July 6, 2015 - 1:00pm

Trees that can tolerate soil pollution are also better at defending themselves against pests and pathogens.

While studying the presence of genetic information (RNA) from fungi and bacteria in the trees, the researchers found evidence of a very large amount of RNA from a very common plant pest called the two-spotted spidermite.

99% of spidermite RNA was in higher abundance in trees without contamination, suggesting that the polluted plant's defense mechanisms, used to protect itself against chemical contamination, improves its resistance to a biological invader. 


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A Call To Ban Individuals From Shooting Off Fireworks

July 6, 2015 - 12:30pm

Another Fourth of July is here, the time for backyard barbecues, picnics, cookouts, parades, swimming and fireworks.

One of those Independence Day pastimes, however, stands apart: fireworks. They’re a somewhat controversial topic in the US and are covered by a patchwork of different laws.

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Non-Verbal Smell Test May Be Indicator Of Autism

July 6, 2015 - 12:15pm

When we smell a rose, we might take a deep breath to get the the sweet but subtle floral scent - and in a public bathroom we would wisely do just the opposte. Yet people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) don't make this natural adjustment like other people do, autistic children go right on sniffing in the same way, no matter how pleasant or awful the scent.

Researchers writing in a new paper suggest that non-verbal tests related to smell might serve as useful early indicators of ASD. Earlier evidence had indicated that people with autism have impairments in "internal action models," the brain templates we rely on to seamlessly coordinate our senses and actions. It wasn't clear if this impairment would show up in a test of the sniff response, however.


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Nanospiked Bacteria Are The Brightest Hard X-Ray Emitters

July 6, 2015 - 12:10pm

In a step that they say overturns traditional assumptions and practice, researchers at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai and Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhi Nagar have fashioned bacteria to emit intense, hard x-ray radiation.

When one thinks of hard x-rays and bacteria it is usually that the bacteria are at the receiving end of the x-ray source - being imaged, irradiated for some modification or simply assessed for radiation damage. One hardly thinks of using bacteria as a source of x-rays, far from turning them into the brightest among such sources.


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Why We Still Love Alice In Wonderland

July 5, 2015 - 7:34pm
Few in the English-speaking world (and even the non-English-speaking world) are unfamiliar with Alice and her encounters with nonsense and play in Wonderland, whether through the original texts, or their many adaptations. Alice has walked across pages, stages, and screens; she is playable and played.

This timeless text speaks to all - adult, child, reader and player. The adaptability of Lewis Carroll’s language, the openness of its story world and the malleable nature of Alice’s character all beckon us to return to Wonderland in its many different guises.

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Heat For Sore Joints - Now In A Flexible Mesh

July 5, 2015 - 4:30pm
If you suffer from chronic muscle pain a doctor will likely recommend for you to apply heat to the injury, but how do you wrap that heat around a joint?

A team has come up with therapeutic heat in a light, flexible design. 

Other teams have come up with similar devices, but no one was able to create something that didn’t rely on exotic materials or a complex fabrication process which leads to high price tags. The new mesh doesn't need carbon nanotubes and gold, it uses silver nanowires. 
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Dementia Sufferers Benefit From GPS

July 5, 2015 - 4:00pm
A  study of 200 dementia sufferers in Norway reveals that almost all experience greater peace of mind and increased levels of physical activity using GPS devices.

The study forms part of the public sector innovation projects collectively known as "Trygge Spor og Samspill" (Safe tracking and interaction) – a joint initiative launched in 2011 being carried out by SINTEF together with a number of Norwegian municipalities. The initial project began with five municipalities and 50 dementia sufferers, and in 2015 it was expanded to include 18 municipalities.
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New GHOST Technology Leaps Out Of The Screen

July 5, 2015 - 3:30pm
Nothing will make you feel like Tony Stark more than being able to change the shape of displays with your hands, pulling objects and data out of the screen and playing with them in mid-air.

Right now, that's just in an Avengers movie. Instead, we live in a world of flat-screen displays, even though the real world is not flat, it has hills and valleys, people and objects. Being able to manipulate a display and drag features into a 3-D world is the purpose of GHOST (Generic, Highly-Organic Shape-Changing Interfaces), an EU research project designed to tap humans’ ability to reason about and manipulate physical objects through the interfaces of computers and mobile devices.
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Genetic Testing In Kids - The Science Isn't Complicated But The Psychology Is

July 5, 2015 - 3:00pm

A woman coping with the burden of familial breast cancer can't help but wonder if her young daughter will suffer the same fate. Has she inherited the same disease-causing mutation? Is it better to start working on worst-case scenarios now or wait? What will each do?


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How To Approach The Visually Impaired - And How Not To

July 5, 2015 - 1:00pm
As millions of visually impaired people will tell you, people with full sight often make incorrect assumptions about their capabilities. It's not mean, it's benevolent, but people are uncomfortable with not knowing what is proper decorum and some can make hilarious errors.
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Glacial Quakes As Indicators Of Glacier Disruption

July 5, 2015 - 10:03am

Observations of Greenland's Helheim Glacier link the process through which chunks of ice at the edge of a glacier break away, which has been hard to study, to seismically detectable events known as glacial earthquakes, which have been increasing in number in recent years.

Because seismic signals from these events can be detected by instruments located all over the globe, it should be possible to use glacial earthquakes as proxies for the glacier edge breaking process, known as calving.


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Phase IIb Pivotal Clinical Study Of P2B001 For The Treatment Of Early Stage Parkinson's Disease

July 4, 2015 - 5:21pm

The Phase IIb pivotal study of P2B001 for the treatment of early stage Parkinson's Disease has been announced as a success. 

P2B001 is a combination of low dose pramipexole and low dose rasagiline administered as a proprietary sustained release formulation. The study, titled A Phase IIb, Twelve Week, Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Study, To Determine the Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of Two Doses of Once Daily P2B001 in Subjects with Early Parkinson's Disease, showed that it met primary and secondary clinical endpoints for both dose combinations. Specifically, the results showed:


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Eye Disease Detected - Using A Smartphone

July 4, 2015 - 4:00pm
Researchers at the Medical and Surgical Center for Retina have developed software that detects eye diseases such as diabetic macular edema using a smartphone. 

The technology was designed for general physicians who support the health system in Mexico to detect certain abnormalities without  an ophthalmologist and send the patient to the specialist.

It's obviously better and cheaper to prevent blindness rather than try to cure it so an app on a cellphone that just needs to focus on the eye is better in all ways. This is especially important in rural communities, where expertise areas such as ophthalmology won't be commonly available.

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Milk-Based Paint Of 47,000 B.C.

July 4, 2015 - 3:00pm

A milk-and ochre-based paint dates that may have been used by inhabitants to South Africa to adorn themselves or decorate stone or wood slabs has been dated to 49,000 years ago. 

While the use of ochre by early humans dates to at least 250,000 years ago in Europe and Africa, this is the first time a paint containing ochre and milk has ever been found in association with early humans in South Africa, said Paola Villa, a curator at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History and lead study author.

The milk likely was obtained by killing lactating members of the bovid family such as buffalo, eland, kudu and impala, she said.


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Radiation Detectors Click By Design

July 4, 2015 - 2:13pm

The most popular form of radiation detector used is probably the Geiger-Mueller (GM) detector.  A GM detector is typically the device seen being used on TV shows and movies when measuring radiation.  The GM detector is the device which is making clicking noises which clicks faster and faster when it is exposed to increasingly greater amount of radiation.

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Patients With Recurrent Depression Have Smaller Hippocampi

July 4, 2015 - 1:30pm

The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus (the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories) than healthy individuals, according to a study of nearly 9,000 people called the ENIGMA study.

The researchers say this is the largest international study to compare brain volumes in people with and without major depression. It highlights the need to identify and treat depression effectively when it first occurs, particularly among teenagers and young adults. Using magnetic resonance imaged (MRI) brain scans, and clinical data from 1,728 people with major depression and 7,199 healthy individuals, the study combined 15 datasets from Europe, the USA and Australia. 


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Obese Teens Are Less Likely To Use Contraception

July 3, 2015 - 11:42pm

A study of nearly 1,000 teens found that sexually active obese adolescents were significantly less likely to use contraception than normal weight peers, putting them at higher risk of unintended pregnancy. Obese adolescents who did use contraception were also less likely to use it consistently, according to the paper. 

Researchers analyzed 26,545 weekly journal surveys measuring sexual practices and contraceptive use from a longitudinal study of 900 women ages 18-19 in Michigan. They examined the association between weight and sexual behaviors.


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