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Europe Reinvestigates Fetal Cell Transplants For Parkinson’s Disease

October 8, 2014 - 1:00pm

Substantia Nigra's dopamine producing cells degrade in Parkinson's disease Credit: Geoff B Hall - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons via Wikimedia Commons

By Meredith Knight, Genetic Literacy Project -->

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Jurassic Dining: How Giant Dinosaurs Shared Space

October 8, 2014 - 12:30pm

Sauropods,  large, long-necked plant-eating dinosaurs such as Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, are the largest animals to have ever walked the Earth, with the biggest weighing 80 tons.

Clearly, a single creature the size of 11 elephants would have needed vast amounts of food. How did multiple sauropod species live alongside one another in prehistoric ecosystems between 210 and 65 million years ago?

New research from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum, London details the community of the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation, a distinctive sequence of sedimentary rock in the western United States from which over 10 species of sauropod are known.


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Peptide Mimic: A Universal Ebola Drug Target

October 7, 2014 - 10:01pm

Researchers have created a molecule known as a peptide mimic that displays a functionally critical region of the virus that is universally conserved in all known species of Ebola. This new tool can be used as a drug target in the discovery of anti-Ebola agents that are effective against all known strains and likely future strains. 

Ebola is a lethal virus that causes severe hemorrhagic fever with a 50 percent to 90 percent mortality rate. There are five known species of the virus. Outbreaks have been occurring with increasing frequency in recent years, and an unprecedented and rapidly expanding Ebola outbreak is currently spreading through several countries in West Africa with devastating consequences.


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Sugar Implicated In Memory Problems

October 7, 2014 - 9:30pm

Using rats as model subjects, scientists have found that adolescents were at an increased risk of suffering negative health effects from sugar-sweetened beverage consumption.

Adolescent rats that freely consumed large quantities of liquid solutions containing sugar or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in concentrations comparable to popular sugar-sweetened beverages experienced memory problems and brain inflammation, according to a new study. Neither adult rats fed the sugary drinks nor adolescent rats who did not consume sugar had the same issues.


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Encourage Diversity: Weight-Inclusive Versus Weight-Normative Health Policy

October 7, 2014 - 9:01pm

Emphasizing weight in health definitions could be harmful to patients, finds an article in the Journal of Obesity

Dr. Rachel Calogero of the School of Psychology at the University of Kent and colleagues recommend that this approach, known as 'weight-normative', is replaced by health care professionals, public health officials and policy-makers with a 'weight-inclusive' approach. 


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Cancer Might Grow Faster At Night

October 7, 2014 - 8:12pm
It's not a movie about zombies, but it's a Halloween nightmare - at night while we sleep unaware, something deadly grows and spreads quickly.

In a surprise finding, Weizmann Institute of Science researchers have found that nighttime is the right time for cancer to grow and spread in the body. Their findings suggest that administering certain treatments in time with the body’s day-night cycle could boost their efficiency.
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Live And Let-7: Autophagy And Cell Survival

October 7, 2014 - 7:32pm

A microRNA molecule has been tagged as a surprisingly crucial player in managing cell survival and growth. The findings underscore the emerging recognition that non-coding RNAs – small molecules that are not translated into working proteins – help regulate basic cellular processes and may be key to developing new drugs and therapies.

Principal investigator Albert R. La Spada, MD, PhD, professor of cellular and molecular medicine at UC San Diego, and colleagues found that a microRNA known as let-7 controls autophagy through the amino acid sensing pathway, which has emerged as the most potent activator of mTORC1 complex activity.


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Transport, Trade And Travel

October 7, 2014 - 7:02pm

was the title of a history book I had as a boy.  Good things, in their way — without them, I wouldn’t be able to sit here talking to you all and meeting some very interesting people online.  But some decidedly unpleasant customers do all too often hitch a ride.

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Men Are More Competitive Runners, Women Are More Social

October 7, 2014 - 7:01pm

There are lots of distance runners in the United States, there is no real gender gap about participation. But there is when it comes to competition, the difference is there.

A new paper in Evolutionary Psychology says that, on average, American men participate at track meets about three times as often as American women, and this difference has been consistent since the late 1990s. By contrast, at road races, the sex difference in participation has disappeared.


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Around The World In 400,000 Years: The Genome Of The World's Most Widely Distributed Land Carnivore

October 7, 2014 - 6:30pm

In the past, researchers have primarily used the genetic history of mothers to understand evolution in animals, but a new study has investigated ancestry across the red fox genome, including the Y chromosome (paternal line) and  found some surprises about the origins, journey and evolution of the red fox, the world's most widely distributed land carnivore.

Conventional thinking based on maternal genetics suggested that red foxes of Eurasia and North America composed a single interconnected population across the Bering land bridge between Asia and Alaska.


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How To Plan For A Better Death

October 7, 2014 - 5:30pm

We all have the legal right to refuse health care. Credit: Warren Goldswain

By Margaret Brown, University of South Australia

Have you thought about how you would want to be treated if you cannot make your own decisions?

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29-Year 100 Billion Animal Study Reinforces Safety Of GM Foods

October 7, 2014 - 4:49pm


By Jon Entine, Genetic Literacy Project

Visit almost any anti-GMO website and you will find alarming headlines about the alleged dangers of GMO foods. They kill pigs, cows and sheep on farms and in lab studies! Humans are next!

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In Distantly Related Species, Bigger Isn’t Better

October 7, 2014 - 4:00pm

Sparkling Violetear.
Image courtesy of Paul Martin

By Katharine Gammon, Inside Science

(Inside Science) – Most of the time, for an individual animal, the bigger you are, the more likely you are to succeed. But sometimes, the little guy prevails – and scientists are just starting to understand how and when this happens.

“While there has been research on body size and aggressive conflict, no one had looked at why small species can prevail,” said Paul Martin, a biologist at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario.

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Physics Nobel Prize Awarded For Blue LEDs

October 7, 2014 - 3:38pm
Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura have been award the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources". Using blue LEDs, white light can be created in a new way and that means LED lamps, which are longer-lasting and more efficient than incandescent sources.
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Sandwiches: The Little Discussed Factor In Dietary Sodium Intake

October 7, 2014 - 3:04pm

Sodium is back in the health concern cycle and an analysis of data in the federal nationwide dietary intake survey known as "What We Eat in America NHANES 2009-2010," has led a team of Department of Agriculture (USDA) to conclude that, on any given day 49 percent of U.S. adults eat at least one sandwich, and sandwiches account for 20 percent of total daily sodium intake. 


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Time Dilation And Quantum Electrodynamics - Einstein Wins Again

October 7, 2014 - 2:45pm

No one is seriously expecting to overturn Einstein's idea of time dilation, and instead the goal is often to find the possible limits. That means looking for deviations in experiments with increasing precision or under extreme conditions. 


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Uterus Transplant Leads To First Successful Baby Delivery

October 7, 2014 - 2:29pm

Seven Swedish women have had embryos reintroduced after receiving wombs from living donors and now one has delivered a healthy and normally developed boy, reveals the case study in The Lancet.

The uterus transplantation research project at the University of Gothenburg started in 1999 and the goal has been to enable women who were born without a womb or who have lost their wombs in cancer surgery to give birth to their own children.

Nine women in the project have received a womb from live donors – in most cases the recipient's mother but also other family members and close friends. The transplanted uterus was removed in two cases, in one case due to a serious infection and in the other due to blood clots in the transplanted blood vessels.


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The Quote Of The Week - A Between-The-Lines Accusation Of Scientific Fraud

October 7, 2014 - 1:28pm
"Fermilab has very actively tried to scoop us by press release, even though their uncertainties are under serious challenge and they knew our measurements even before they released theirs."

Michael Riordan, a member to the Mark II collaboration, in an interview by David Perlman on the San Francisco Chronicle, July 21st 1989
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How Genes Influence Children’s Exam Results

October 7, 2014 - 1:01pm

What role do genes have to play in children's exam results? Student test by  wavebreakmedia -->

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