Science2.0

Syndicate content
Science 2.0® - Science for the next 2,000 years
Updated: 1 hour 50 min ago

Artificial Intelligence Software Using Images Boosts Web Searches

November 18, 2014 - 10:00pm

New artificial intelligence software uses photos to locate documents on the Internet with far greater accuracy than ever before, showing for the first time that a machine learning algorithm for image recognition and retrieval is accurate and efficient enough to improve large-scale document searches online.

The system uses pixel data in images and potentially video - rather than just text -- to locate documents. It learns to recognize the pixels associated with a search phrase by studying the results from text-based image search engines. The knowledge gleaned from those results can then be applied to other photos without tags or captions, making for more accurate document search results. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

To Survive A Car Crash, Be Young, Male And Drive A BFC

November 18, 2014 - 9:30pm

Vehicle fatalities are the most common cause of accidental death around the world. In the US alone, there are 30,000 deaths in car crashes each year. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Musicians Have Better Long-term Memory

November 18, 2014 - 9:04pm

Imagine we gave you three letters, say G, C and D. Then we gave you a name to associate to some combination of those three letters. How many could you recall on command?

Guitarists in cover bands do that all of the time. They can play thousands of songs from memory, and it's not uncommon in most musicians. There have been numerous studies regarding music and memory and a peek inside the brains of professional musicians adds to that.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Maybe Volcanoes Have Been Slowing Global Warming

November 18, 2014 - 8:45pm

Volcanoes have long been known to have an impact on climate - the 1815 Tambora volcanic eruption is famous for its impact on climate worldwide, making 1816 the 'Year Without a Summer'.

Maybe they are the reason global warming has not taken off the way climate researchers estimated it would. Sulfur dioxide gas that eruptions expel might be cooling the atmosphere more than previously thought, contributing to the recent slowdown in global warming, according to a new study.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

ADHD Surge Is More Marketing Than Medicine

November 18, 2014 - 7:16pm

You can't catch attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) but you wouldn't know that by the way diagnoses are spreading - up 10X in some countries. 


read more

Categories: Science2.0

'Mexican Waves' In The Brain Revealed

November 18, 2014 - 6:28pm

Neurons - cells in the brain that communicate chemical and electrical information - belong to one of two groups, inhibitory or excitatory. Much is known about excitatory neurons but not so much for inhibitory ones.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Acculturative Stress Causes Depression, Suicide In Latino Youth

November 18, 2014 - 6:27pm

An epidemiology analysis finds that acculturative stress, which is a term created to highlight that immigrants straddling two different cultures have greater stress than natives, is the reason Latino youth in Indiana have higher suicide and depression rates than white counterparts.

Young people are forced to be one thing in their homes and then also part of the larger outside culture and the conflict
between Latino teens and their parents regarding what they do and how they should act at, for example, school versus home, adds to the pressure of teenage years.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Coffee Creamer, Crackers Linked To Worse Memory

November 18, 2014 - 5:19pm

A new study finds that people of 1914 may have had worse memory than people of 1814. The reason is partially hydrogenated oil - trans fats - that became a cheaper, healthier replacement for the saturated fats in butter. Crystallized cottonseed oil - Crisco - came onto the marketplace in 1911 and it revolutionized pie crusts but now the government says they should be banned and they now have a new reason why.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Ancient Chinese Secret: Turmeric Spices Up Your Memory

November 18, 2014 - 5:06pm

A single gram of turmeric at breakfast could help improve the memory of people who are in the very early stages of diabetes and potentially at greater risk of cognitive impairment.


Turmeric is widely used in Asian cooking. Its characteristic yellow color is due to curcumin, which accounts for 3 to 6 per cent of turmeric and has been found in some studies to reduce the risk of dementia. The finding has particular significance given that the world's aging population and higher risk of dementia.

Monash University Professor Wahlqvist recently led a study in Taiwan that tested the working memory of men and women aged 60 or older who had recently been diagnosed with untreated pre-diabetes.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Microvascular Dysfunction Common In Cocaine Users

November 18, 2014 - 4:58pm

Cocaine users complaining of chest pain may have microvascular dysfunction, improper blood flow through the smallest blood vessels that may not be detected in regular testing, putting these patients at risk for heart complications or death, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Some Poor People Have Better Health

November 18, 2014 - 4:57pm

It is a weekly event in epidemiology - some medical or health outcome is linked to socioeconomic inequality, as if more spending makes people healthy.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Family Planning: Involving Men Empowers Women

November 18, 2014 - 4:17pm

In America, and to a much less extent in Europe, there can be a lot of angst when an aerospace engineer wears the wrong shirt on television. Women have a great deal of power in western nations, so much so that they can overwhelm science breakthroughs with cultural Gerrymandering.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

PIWI Pathway Isn't Perfect But It's What Keeps Transposons From Destroying Your Genes

November 18, 2014 - 2:00pm

We like to think of evolution as a fine-tuning process, one that whittles away genetic imperfections and redundancies and converges on a more efficient system because of 'survival of the fittest'.

But natural selection is just one mechanism of evolution and what is fittest at one point may not have been fittest at another, yet could still be inherited. Our bodies are full of parts that we inherited and either don't work anymore or are rather buggy and other parts have simply found a way to make work.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Phthalates And Prostates: Endocrine Disruptors Shortening The Distance Between Male Anus And Penis

November 18, 2014 - 11:01am
Men are becoming more effeminate. That is not news. If you watched the ESA's Rosetta mission arrive at Comet P67 you saw a tattoo-covered fellow talk about engineering and he looked manly, but two days later he was crying during a press conference because his bowling shirt had offended women on Twitter.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Decrease Heart Disease - It's No Fish Tale

November 18, 2014 - 12:21am

Increasing the amount of omega-3s in your diet will likely decrease your risk of getting heart disease, according to Penn State nutritionists who cite evidence supporting the heart-health benefits of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA and DHA), marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

The Collapse Of The Bronze Age - Climate Change Didn't Do It

November 17, 2014 - 9:30pm

Empires have risen and fallen and often it has been due to changes in the climate. When agriculture was a more demanding endeavor people wanted the most fertile lands and as that shifted, so did cities.

For that reason, climate change has often been cited as the most logical reason for a huge population collapse in Europe at the end of the Bronze Age. Now archaeologists and environmentalists say they can prove definitively that climate change could not have been the culprit. Because the changes in climate that scientists believed to coincide with the fall in population in fact occurred at least two generations later.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Can GPS Satellites Detect Dark Matter?

November 17, 2014 - 9:01pm

"Dark matter" is a blanket term for inferred matter that is undetected but must exist in order for gravity at very large scales to make any sense at all.

Based on inference, 27 percent of the universe is generally acknowledged to be dark matter, even though it is not visible and eludes direct detection and measurement. Whatever dark energy might turn out to be gets a number of about 68 percent of the universe. The rest of the universe, what we can detect and feel, is what we know to be matter. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Alternative Medicine For Plants: Probiotics And Detox Instead Of GMOs

November 17, 2014 - 8:00pm

Scientists have found that transplanting a microbe that occurs naturally in eastern cottonwood trees boosts the ability of willow and lawn grass to withstand the effects of the industrial pollutant phenanthrene.

Because the plants can then take up 25 to 40 percent more of the pollutant than untreated plants they could be useful in phytoremediation, the process of using plants to remove toxins from contaminated sites, without all the environmentalist political lobbying drama of using genetically modified plants to do the same thing. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

FrankenTrees - Three New Dogwoods Created

November 17, 2014 - 7:00pm

Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa) and various genetically modified relatives are the most popular and economically significant members of the genus Cornus in the nursery and landscape industries. These deciduous trees are highly valued for their spring display of pink, red, or white bracts, brilliant red fall foliage, and exfoliating bark and in the US sales of dogwoods account for more than $30 million dollars each year.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Domesday Book Listing Is Still A Ticket To Being Upper Class In England

November 17, 2014 - 6:27pm

What's in a name? Apparently a lot. So much so that social mobility in England hasn't changed much since pre-Industrial times.

After William the Conqueror defeated King Harold II at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, making England a French country rather than an Anglo-Saxon one, he rewarded his supporters with lands taken from those who had been loyal to his opponent. He was very good to them - but he wanted his levies. So if your name appeared in the original Domesday Book, you were going to get a tax bill, but the benefits were so substantial you are more likely to be upper class even today.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0