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Britain Faces Winter Energy Cuts

November 6, 2014 - 5:00pm

The Drax plant in Yorkshire. Gareth Davies, CC BY

By Richard Tol, University of Sussex

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Ancient Horse Fossil Contains Unborn Foal

November 6, 2014 - 3:09pm

A fossil of the ancient horse Eurohippus messelensis found in Germany contains a fetus as well as parts of the uterus and associated tissues.

Eurohippus messelensis had four toes on each forefoot and three toes on each the hind foot, and it was about the size of a modern fox terrier. Though different in size and structure, reproduction in early horses was very similar to that of modern horses. The new find was unveiled at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology in Berlin.


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In Modern Leaders, Looking Healthy Is More Important Than Looking Smart

November 6, 2014 - 2:30pm

John F. Kennedy didn't just win the presidential election in 1960 because an alarming number of dead people in Chicago and Texas voted for him, it was only close in the first place because his debate with Vice-President Richard Nixon was televised - and he thought makeup was unmanly. While Kennedy looked healthy and vigorous, Nixon looked pale and sweaty. History was made and politics was changed forever.

Two generations later, a healthy complexion is vital - but looking intelligent is not as important, except for positions that require negotiation between groups or exploration of new markets, find the authors of a paper in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.


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New Estimates Of Heat Waves Predicts Their Magnitude

November 6, 2014 - 2:30pm

A new index to measure the magnitude of heat waves finds that under the worst climate scenario of temperature rise, estimated to be as much as 8.6 degrees Fahrenheit, extreme heat waves might become the norm by the end of the century.

They project that heat waves like the one that hit Russia in summer 2010, the strongest in recent decades, could occur as often as every two years.


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Postpone Brain Aging With A High-Fat Diet

November 6, 2014 - 2:00pm

There's a new reason not to go on a low-fat diet. The signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if placed on a high-fat diet, which opens up the possibility for treatment of patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. 

When we get older, defects begin to develop in our nervous system and our brain loses some of its intellectual capacity. The risk of developing diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's also increases. Alzheimer's disease is currently the fastest-growing age-related disease.


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Testing Could Reduce Unnecessary Antibiotics Prescriptions

November 6, 2014 - 2:00pm

Fast testing for bacterial infections may help to reduce excessive antibiotic use, finds a systematic review. When doctors tested for the presence of bacterial infections, they prescribed fewer antibiotics.


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Young Patients With Colorectal Cancer Could Double By 2030

November 6, 2014 - 1:30pm

By 2030, nearly 10 percent of colon cancers and nearly 25 percent of rectal cancers will be diagnosed in patients younger than the traditional screening age. This growing public health problem is underscored by data trends among 20- to 34-year-olds in the U.S., among whom the incidence of colon and rectal cancer (CRC) is expected to increase by 90% and 124.2%, respectively, by 2030.

Nearly 137,000 people will be diagnosed with
colon and rectal cancer
in the U.S. this year, and more than 50,000 will die of the disease.
colon and rectal cancer
is the third most common cancer among men and women, and the third leading cause of cancer death.


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Addiction Recovery Means A Lot Of Sleepless Nights

November 6, 2014 - 1:30pm

Addiction recovery has numerous pitfalls and the inability to sleep only compounds the risk of relapse, so persistent insomnia is a concern, write researchers in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

The authors believe that the incidence of insomnia in early recovery may be five times higher than the general population and may persist for months or even years. They say insomnia may be linked with a higher risk of alcohol-related problems and relapse. The association may run in the other direction as well—population studies report people with sleep disturbance are more likely to be at risk of developing addiction..


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Tobacco Shop Density Causes Teens To Smoke

November 6, 2014 - 1:00pm

Do stores that carry cigarettes create new smokers or do they carry cigarettes because their customers smoke? Would a nexus of comic book stores create more comic book readers? Will that work with broccoli?

A new geography paper matches smoking to store locations that carry cigarettes and correlates the two, suggesting that teenagers are much more likely to take up smoking if they live in neighborhoods with a large number of shops that sell tobacco products.


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Created: Brain To Brain Interface Between People

November 6, 2014 - 1:00pm

Words are so 20th century. The 21st century could belong to brains communicating directly with each other.

Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people. In the newly published paper, which involved six people, researchers were able to transmit the signals from one person's brain over the Internet and use these signals to control the hand motions of another person within a split second of sending that signal.


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Why Rosetta Is The Greatest Space Mission Of Our Lifetime

November 6, 2014 - 12:30pm

Rosetta mission: A giant leap for humans and robots. Huart, ESA

By Natalie Starkey, The Open University

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More Gambling Does Not Lead To More Gambler Addiction - Study

November 5, 2014 - 10:31pm

Online gambling has exploded in the last decades and several states, hungry for more revenue without direct taxes, have approved measures to legalize various types of gambling.

Critics contend that will lead to more crime and more broken homes due to gambling problems.

A new University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions (RIA) survey says that isn't the case. They interviewed 2,613 people in 1999-2000, and the second survey interviewed 2,963 people in 2011-13. Individuals were asked about their participation in a broad range of gambling activities, including raffles, office pools, pulltabs, bingo, cards, pool, gambling machines, casinos, lottery, Internet gambling, and sports, horse or dog track betting.


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Do Women Have Better Noses Than Men?

November 5, 2014 - 9:44pm

When it comes to our senses, there is a lot of diversity in people. One person might have 10X the taste buds on their tongue as another person, for example, so they are more sensitive to bitters and sweets. But is there a quantifiable gender difference in the ability to hear or taste?

A new paper says women smell better than men - not as in their odor, but in their ability to detect and evaluate odors. If so, they postulate that sex differences in olfactory detection may play a role in differentiated social behaviors and may be connected to one's perception of smell, which is naturally linked to associated experiences and emotions.

The big question is whether or not any olfactory superiority is cognitive or emotional rather than perceptual.  


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Gender Bias In Osteoporosis Screening

November 5, 2014 - 8:30pm

Each year nearly 2,000,000 Americans suffer osteoporosis-related fractures but after it happens, 53 percent of women received Dual X-ray Absorptiometry, the preferred technique for measuring bone mineral density and therefore osteoporosis, compared with only 18 percent of men. 

As the population ages, fractures are expected to increase dramatically, placing a major burden on the health care system and a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) suggests that bias against men in favor of post-menopausal women will lead to lower quality of care and higher costs.


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Location, Location, Location: A Real Estate Axiom For The Genesis Of Genitalia

November 5, 2014 - 8:15pm

Nature enjoys variety, that is why it seems like evolution must have been drinking during the creation of some of the crazier things in biology. 

There is no intelligent reason why snakes and lizards have two genitalia while birds and people have one - or why the former group's paired structures are located somewhat at the level of the limbs while with humans and birds it appears a bit further down. In fact, snake and lizard genitalia are derived from tissue that gives rise to hind legs, while mammalian genitalia are derived from the tail bud. But despite such noteworthy contrasts, these structures are functionally analogous and express similar genes. 

How do these equivalent structures arise from different starting tissues? 


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Will The Ethical Social Scientists Please Stand Up?

November 5, 2014 - 8:01pm

Old fashioned scandals meet new-fangled complexity. Andy Dean Photography

By Mark Israel, University of Western Australia

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Inspiration Or Self-Loathing? Why Do Women Buy Magazines That Promote Glamorous Body Images?

November 5, 2014 - 7:57pm

Fashion and beauty magazines are tremendously successful, as are television ad campaigns where women who are 5'10" and weigh 120 lbs. model jeans. Clearly, most women do not look like that and never will, so why do they buy magazines and clothes that remind them of it?

While critics insist that Americans, the fattest people on the planet, are under too much pressure to be thin, the truth is instead that they like role models, no differently than how some parents will buy a particular magazine if it has a female scientist on the cover.


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Coming To You Live From The Nano-Cosmos

November 5, 2014 - 6:40pm

Researchers have witnessed how football-shaped carbon molecules known as
buckyballs
arrange themselves into ultra-smooth layers, all in real time, and by piecing that together with theoretical simulations, the investigators believe they can advance the field of plastic electronics. 

Buckyballs are spherical molecules which consist of 60 carbon atoms (C60), named such because they are reminiscent of American architect Richard Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes. With their structure of alternating pentagons and hexagons, they also resemble tiny molecular footballs.


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Brand It Like Beckham: 4 Things Posh Spice Can Teach Young Entrepreneurs

November 5, 2014 - 4:30pm

Brand Beckham. Dave Thompson/PA Wire

By Tamara Friedrich, University of Warwick

Victoria Beckham has been named Entrepreneur of the Year by Management Today. She topped their list of 100 successful entrepreneurs thanks to her fashion company’s turnover, which has grown from £1m to £30m in the past five years, and its employment growth, which has grown from three members of staff to 100 in the same time.

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Children Born Just After The Berlin Wall Fell Were Lower Achievers – Here’s Why

November 5, 2014 - 4:30pm

The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Gavin Andrew Stewart, CC BY

By Arnaud Chevalier, Royal Holloway and Olivier Marie, Maastricht University

Germany and the rest of Europe are celebrating the 25th anniversary of the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the associated communist regimes in Eastern Europe.

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