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Updated: 58 min 54 sec ago

Computer Models Says Australia Drying Due To Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases

July 13, 2014 - 11:30pm

A new climate model says that southwestern Australia's long-term decline in fall and winter rainfall is caused by increases in man-made greenhouse gas emissions and ozone depletion.


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A Boron Cage Discovered?

July 13, 2014 - 11:00pm

In the 1980s, the discovery of soccer-ball-shaped carbon molecules called buckyballs helped to spur an explosion in nanotechnology research.

Now, there appears to be a new ball on the pitch - a cluster of 40 boron atoms forms a hollow molecular cage similar to a carbon buckyball. It's the first experimental evidence that a boron cage structure, previously only a matter of speculation, does indeed exist.

Carbon buckyballs are made of 60 carbon atoms arranged in pentagons and hexagons to form a sphere—like a soccer ball. Their discovery in 1985 was soon followed by discoveries of other hollow carbon structures including carbon nanotubes. Another famous carbon nanomaterial—a one-atom-thick sheet called graphene—followed shortly after.


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Is Organic Food More Nutritious And Safer Than Conventional? Reviewing A Recent Systematic Review

July 13, 2014 - 10:28pm



A recent review in the British Journal of Nutrition concluded that the nutritional quality and safety of organic food was higher than conventional food. Fruits, vegetables, and grains, organic versions were better in all ways than conventional farming, they determined.

Organic food had fewer pesticides, a much different result than other studies, and also had more important nutrients, also a much different result than other studies.


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Smell You Later - Scent And Social Signals In Arousal

July 13, 2014 - 7:30pm

A new study finds that Silverback gorillas appear to use odor as a form of communication with other gorillas.


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ADSCs Transplantation Promotes Neurogenesis In Alzheimer's Disease

July 13, 2014 - 6:24pm

Recent evidence has demonstrated that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells can stimulate neurogenesis in the brain of adult rat or mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improve tissue and function injury under the condition of cerebral ischemia. Few studies are reported on the therapeutic effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transplantation in mice with AD and on the effect on oxidative injury and neurogenesis in the brain of AD mice. Dr. Yufang Yan and her team, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, China transplanted ADSCs into the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice.


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Exercise Is The Best Medicine At Any Age - But Especially For Women In Old Age

July 13, 2014 - 6:24pm

Women would benefit from being prescribed exercise as medicine, according to a study finding that moderate to high intensity activity is essential to reducing the risk of death in older women.

Professor Debra Anderson, from Queensland University of Technology's Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, said that in addition to conventional treatments for physical and mental health, health professionals should be prescribing tailored exercise programs for older women.

The paper by Anderson and Queensland University of Technology's Dr Charlotte Seib pulls together five years of research looking into the impact of exercise on mental and physical health in women over the age of 50.


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Genome Editing Brings Possibility Of Gene Therapies Closer To Reality

July 13, 2014 - 4:30pm

Researchers have evaluated the safety and reliability of the existing targeted gene correction technologies, and successfully developed a new method, TALEN-HDAdV, which could significantly increased gene-correction efficiency in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC). 

The combination of stem cells and targeted genome editing technology provides a powerful tool to model human diseases and develop potential cell replacement therapy. Although the utility of genome editing has been extensively documented, but the impact of these technologies on mutational load at the whole-genome level remains unclear.


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The Ulterior Motive In Baboon Grooming

July 13, 2014 - 4:00pm

Social animals often develop relationships with other group members to reduce aggression and gain access to scarce resources. In wild chacma baboons the strategy for grooming activities shows a certain pattern across the day - they have ulterior motives. 


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Women Who Kill Their Children Are Not So Bad, Says Psychologist

July 13, 2014 - 3:02pm
Neonaticide and infanticide are horrible crimes to most people but in psychology it's all relative. 

Dr. Helen Gavin, a psychologist at the University of Huddersfield, and Dr. Theresa Porter, a clinical psychologist based at a hospital in Connecticut, think that such murderers are getting a bad rap in culture, so they wrote "Infanticide and Neonaticide: A Review of 40 Years of Research Literature on Incidence and Causes" for Trauma, Violence and Abuse to rationalize that women who kill their babies – either within 24 hours of birth (neonaticide) – or at a later stage (infanticide), are not simply simply monsters or psychotic or both. It's complex, they wrote.
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Smoking: Handicapped People Don't Have The Same Incentives To Quit

July 13, 2014 - 2:41pm

Researchers have found that people with mobility impairments, such as using special ambulatory equipment and having difficulty walking one-quarter mile without equipment, under age 65 have significantly higher rates of smoking than those without mobility impairments and smokers with mobility impairments were less likely to attempt quitting .

Evidence-based advertisements about health are not working among people who already don't feel like smoking will make their quality of life worse.  


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Drones Are Not Just For The White House - They Can Help Photographers Too

July 13, 2014 - 10:30am

Though drones have gotten a bad rap lately due to an overzealous American government obsessed with using technology to control the message, they will soon have benefits in the private sector outside bird's eye views of fireworks.

Take photography. Lighting is crucial in photographs and film-making but lights are cumbersome and time-consuming to set up, and out of doors can be prohibitively difficult to position them where, ideally, they ought to go.

Researchers at MIT and Cornell University hope to change that by providing photographers with squadrons of small, light-equipped autonomous robots that automatically assume the positions necessary to produce lighting effects specified through a simple, intuitive, camera-mounted interface.


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England Football Can Still Win In Brazil - The Robot World Cup

July 12, 2014 - 10:00pm
Though England football fans stopped singing "Three Lions" after the second game of the opening round at World Cup 2014, there is still hope to bring back hardware: in robotics.

The University of Hertfordshire’s robot football team, the ‘Bold Hearts’, is set to fly out to Brazil next week to compete in the 2014 RoboCup robotics world championship, taking place in João Pessoa, Brazil, 19 – 24 July 2014.

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BGI Reports A Novel Gene For Salt Tolerance Found In Wild Soybean

July 12, 2014 - 9:16pm

Shenzhen, July 10, 2014---A team of researchers from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, BGI and other institutes have identified a gene of wild soybean linked to salt tolerance, with implication for improving this important crop to grow in saline soil. This study published online in Nature Communications provides an effective strategy to unveil novel genomic information for crop improvement.


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Want To Simulate The High Pressure Of The Earth's Crust? You Have To Go Nuclear

July 12, 2014 - 8:42pm

A new pressure cell makes it possible to simulate chemical reactions deep in the Earth's crust. The cell allows researchers to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on as little as 10 microliters of liquid at pressures up to 20 kiloBar.


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Ecological Niche Visualized: 14 Fish Get A Four-Dimensional Food Diagram

July 12, 2014 - 7:27pm
We're all aware of the concept of an ecological food niche and a web that extends from it - but it is pretty simplistic and easily leads to claims that if species X is used too much, we are doomed. Literate people know that 99.999% of species had gone extinct and we never even knew they existed.

But some are more important than others and so researchers have taught to make that abstract concept real. Biologists in a new paper outlined the position of fourteen fish species in relationship to their food in a four-dimensional food diagram. 
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Over-Fished Populations Rebuild In Belize No-Take Zones

July 12, 2014 - 6:30pm

A new systematic review says that no-take zones in Belize are helping rebuildeconomically valuable species such as lobster, conch, and fish - and perhaps also helping to re-colonize nearby reef areas.

The literature in the review was from no-take areas around the world.

According to other papers, the recovery of lobster, conch, and other exploited species within marine protected areas with no-take zones, or fully protected reserves, could take as little as 1-6 years. Full recovery of exploited species, however, could take decades.
 


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Kadison-Singer Math Solution May Mean A Boost For Science 2.0

July 12, 2014 - 5:30pm
Dan Spielman, a Yale computer scientist, wanted to model complex online communities like Facebook, hoping to gain insight into how they form and interact. That's one of the precepts of Science 2.0, understanding how people can participate and scientists can collaborate without being drowned in a lot of 'noise' before being put on the right path to either.

A colleague in Jerusalem observed that aspects of Spielman’s research brought to mind a math problem that had been stumping people since Dwight Eisenhower was in office — the Kadison-Singer math problem. The 1950s? A puzzle that wasn't even from a paper, but from the “Related Questions” section of a paper on extensions of pure states? 
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Drawing Stem Cells Out Of Their Niche

July 12, 2014 - 4:30pm

Since stem cell research became common 50 years ago, scientists have been trying to unravel mechanisms that guide function and differentiation of blood stem cells, those cells that generate all blood cells including our immune system.

Study of human blood stem cells is challenging because they can only be found in the bone marrow in specialized "niches" that cannot be recapitulated in a culture dish.


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Obese US Firefighters Don't Get Told To Lose Weight

July 12, 2014 - 3:30pm

You never see them in calendars, but there are obese firefighters - and they don't get told to lose weight by their doctors.

As we all know, there are many healthy obese people, the notion that BMI is some magic button for diabetic and cardiovascular health has long been debunked. Regardless of their appearance, firefighters are trained to do a job. Can't pass training and you don't get to do the job. Yet firefighters do have high rates of obesity, compared to the nature of the job, and like the general public, heart attacks kill more firefighters than doing their job will.


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AP39: Fart Smell Compound May Prevent Diabetes, Heart Attacks And Dementia

July 12, 2014 - 2:57pm
We know that healthy mitochondria, the energy factories of cells, rely on proper reduction and oxidation to keep us converting food to energy and staving off mitochondrial pathologies. Any number of compounds have been created to try and keep that going as we age. They determine whether cells live or die and they regulate inflammation.
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