Science2.0

Syndicate content
Science 2.0® - Science for the next 2,000 years
Updated: 33 min 51 sec ago

More Social: Loneliness Among American Teenagers Declines

November 24, 2014 - 7:00pm

There has been concern about a lessening of social engagement, mostly created by older people who see young people behaving differently than they did (and do). Last decade it was noted that young people were
less likely to join clubs, had fewer close friends, and were less likely to perceive others as trustworthy.

So young people don't join the Masonic Lodge in their college years. Does that mean they are less social? 

No, there has been an increase in extraversion and self-esteem, according to a paper in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. In a review, the authors examined past studies that utilized the Revised UCLA loneliness scale (R-UCLA) to analyze changes in loneliness over time, and gender differences in loneliness.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Chillin' With The Coldest Matter In The World

November 24, 2014 - 6:47pm

Physicists have developed a new cooling technique for mechanical quantum systems by using an ultracold atomic gas, cooling a membrane down to less than 1 degree above absolute zero.

Ultracold atomic gases are among the coldest objects in existence. Laser beams can be used to trap atoms inside a vacuum chamber and slow down their motion to a crawl, reaching temperatures of less than 1 millionth of a degree above absolute zero - the temperature at which all motion stops.

At such low temperatures, atoms obey the laws of quantum physics: they move around like small wave packets and can be in a superposition of being in several places at once. These features are harnessed in technologies such as atomic clocks and other precision measurement devices.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Relevance In Decline? Italian Natural History Museums On The Verge Of Collapse

November 24, 2014 - 6:33pm

Due to a loss of scientific relevance, which has led to scarcity of personnel
and thus decreasing government funding, Italian natural history museums are on the verge of collapse. 

A new paper in Zookeys proposes that the existing museums associate and collaborate to form a diffused structure, able to better manage their scientific collections and share resources and personnel. Basically, they need to be a little more corporate and start consolidating rather than relying on government to some day boost funding.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Surveys Show Global Warming Belief Doesn't Change With The Weather

November 24, 2014 - 6:25pm

What will it take to convince skeptics of global warming that the phenomenon is real? Droughts, floods and heat waves will begin to change minds.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Faces Of Terrorism: Group Identification Changes Perception

November 24, 2014 - 5:45pm

Americans may recall the 'threat warning level' system that came into being after the terrorist attacks on the Wall Trade Center on September 9th, 2011.

It was a color coded with 5 levels. But it never once dropped below 3 - yellow, before it was dissolved in 2011. Did anyone pay attention? Another famous example is the "Doomsday Clock", created by anti-nuclear activists to increase anxiety about nuclear weapons. Even after disarmaments and the collapse of the Soviet Union, it barely moved. We are always on the verge of Doom, according to doomsday prophets, today they just say it's because of global warming, and there are still nuclear power plants, they warn.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Part II: Bee Deaths And CCD - Flawed Chensheng Lu Harvard Studies Endanger Bees

November 24, 2014 - 2:00pm

Last week, in Part I of this two part series, "Bee Deaths Mystery Solved?

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

The Power Of The Christmas Ad To Win Over (And Lose) Customers

November 24, 2014 - 12:31pm

Magic and sparkle? Diliff, CC BY

By Isabelle Szmigin, University of Birmingham

As well as the tell-tale signs of decorations going up, the rolling out of Christmas advertisements has become a key moment for getting us all in the seasonal mood. And the competition to capture the festive spirit – and the customers that come with it – is fierce.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Big Data Could Be A Big Problem For Workplace Discrimination Law

November 23, 2014 - 11:19pm

What if whether you got a job was determined by which web browser you used? Shutterstock

By Mark Burdon, The University of Queensland and Paul Harpur, The University of Queensland

Staff recruitment and retention are an ongoing challenge for employers. Proponents of big data in the workplace are now claiming they can change that.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

GEDi: Genetic Test For Inherited Eye Disease Highly Accurate

November 23, 2014 - 6:43pm

The retina is the neural tissue in the back of the eye that initiates vision. It is responsible for receiving light signals and converting them into neurologic signals, which are then transmitted via the optic nerve to the brain so that we can see.

Mutations that disrupt vision by damaging the retina and optic nerve have been identified in more than 200 genes. This genetic diversity made genetic diagnostic testing difficult until the recent development of high throughput genomic techniques.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Stachys Caroliniana: Rare New Species Of Plant Discovered

November 23, 2014 - 4:20pm

Sometimes you don't need to travel to the unexplored corners of the globe to discover a new species of plant. Sometimes they can be really close to home, you just have to spend 40 years of your life looking.

University of South Carolina
Professor John Nelson and alumnus Douglas Rayner have founds just such a new species close to home and they have dubbed it Stachys caroliniana, a new example of what is commonly called a hedge-nettle or woundwort.

And rarity is unusual among S. caroliniana's closest relatives. There are about 300 species in the genus Stachys, according to Nelson, the curator of the University of South Carolina's A.C. Moore Herbarium. He calls it a "cosmopolitan genus."


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Little Considered: Treatment Of Transgendered Prison Inmates

November 22, 2014 - 6:18pm

It's pretty common in culture, from Turkey to Tennessee, for a public that otherwise does not condone rape to joke about it when it comes to male criminals. And the more heinous the crime, not only does it become acceptable, but almost demanded in a justice system that often favors criminals over victims.

But raping women isn't acceptable in civilized countries. In the modern decade, 'gender' has become a subjective thing. Anthropology papers will even strangely let 'other', including alien life forms, be considered a valid gender in their surveys.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Genetic Clues Of Severe Food Allergy

November 22, 2014 - 4:22pm

Scientists have identified four new genes associated with a severe food allergy called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), which has only recently been recognized as a distinct condition. Its hallmark is inflammation and painful swelling in the esophagus, along with high levels of immune cells called eosinophils. It can affect people of any age, but is more common among young men who have a history of other allergic diseases such as asthma and eczema. 


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Archaea Can Survive Anywhere, Now They Might Be A Source Of Antibacterial Drugs

November 22, 2014 - 4:13pm

Archaea are a family of single-celled organisms that can thrive in environments like boiling hydrothermal pools and smoking deep sea vents deep underground, which are too extreme for most other species to survive.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

50 Percent Of Patients Don't Take Prescription Medications According To Guidance

November 22, 2014 - 4:06pm

It's a story as old as medicine. When it comes to treatments, people don't always obey the written word. When it comes to antibiotics, for example, people may stop taking them when they feel better so they can save them for another incident. 

Prescription medication guidelines are written specifically, to help people get the effect. So why do only 50 patient of patients take prescription medication as they should, 160 years after medicine became a proper field?


read more

Categories: Science2.0

L'Aquila Scientists Free But Political Risks Remain

November 21, 2014 - 10:30pm

L'Aquila is still in repair. Roberto Taddeo

By Lawrence Torcello, Rochester Institute of Technology

It has been five years since an earthquake hit the Italian city of L’Aquila leaving 309 people dead.

In the aftermath one public official and six earthquake scientists were charged with multiple counts of manslaughter. Each defendant was sentenced to six years in jail.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Is Religion A Consolation Worth Having?

November 21, 2014 - 9:18pm

King's College Chapel: beauty, art, profundity – but truth? Tom Thai, CC BY-SA

By Simon Blackburn, University of Cambridge

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

3X Saturated Fat In The Diet Doesn't Increase It In Blood

November 21, 2014 - 8:16pm

Doubling and even nearly tripling saturated fat in diets does not drive up total levels of saturated fat in the blood, according to a controlled diet study.

The researchers found that total saturated fat in the blood did not increase - and went down in most people - despite being increased in the diet when carbohydrates were reduced. Palmitoleic acid, a fatty acid associated with unhealthy metabolism of carbohydrates that can promote disease, went down with low-carb intake and gradually increased as carbs were re-introduced to the study diet.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Did Some Baseball Stars Get Favorable TV Coverage In Steroid Controversy?

November 21, 2014 - 6:35pm

Retired baseball stars Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro each have Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, more than 500 home runs.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Vermicompost Leachate: Liquid Earthworm Poop Improves Organic Tomato Growth

November 21, 2014 - 6:21pm

Want to improve tomato crop yields without using more fertilizer? Try  verimcompost leachate. That is a soil ameliorant, which is basically a fertilizer but made of an organic liquid produced by earthworm poop. If you are really organic, you can even make tea from it. 

A research project recently studied the effects of vermicompost leachate on tomato seedlings subjected to various temperatures and levels of water stress. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0