Science2.0

Syndicate content
Science 2.0® - Science for the next 2,000 years
Updated: 29 min 39 sec ago

Water Structure: It's Different At Nanoscale Size And Different Temperature

May 24, 2017 - 11:09am
The surface of water drops at 100 nm size changes with temperature. At room temperature, the surface water molecules of these droplets have much stronger interactions than a normal water surface. The structural difference corresponds to a difference in temperature of -50°C.

Nanometric-sized water drops are everywhere, as droplets or aerosols in air, in our bodies as medication, and in rocks and oil fields. How they interact with their hydrophobic environment, at the curved droplet interface, a sub-nanometric region that surrounds the small pocket of water, could boost our understanding of atmospheric, biological and geological processes.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Physics-Inspired Artwork In Venice 1: Sub-Lime

May 23, 2017 - 12:36pm

This is the first of a series of posts that will publish the results of artistic work by high-school students of three schools in Venice, who participate in a contest and exposition connected to the initiative "Art and Science across Italy", an initiative of the network CREATIONS, funded by the Horizon 2020 programme

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Can't Sleep? Blame Air Pollution

May 22, 2017 - 12:03pm
Tablet and phone marketing executives can sleep well tonight. While those devices are commonly blamed for recent sleep problems, beams of pure digital energy shot straight into the eyeballs will do that, a new paper seeks to shore up the failing claim that tiny particulate matter, PM 2.5 (2.5 microns per cubic meter of air), is impacting human health and should be the source of new regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

New Heights In Systemic Corrupt Science: Another Hockey Stick; Would You Fund For Retracting?

May 22, 2017 - 6:13am
Well known: Critical science is career suicide. But did you know you are not even allowed to warn the community about fraud committed yourself? Welcome to science, where we reject the scientific method because it slows down publications, and call the public stupid for not trusting us.

The journal ‘ChemSusChem’ was informed already a year ago about fraud in their journal. 'Chemical Communications' has been informed about manipulations that inflate claims by 300%.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Europe In My Region 2017

May 21, 2017 - 8:08pm
The European Commission has launched a couple of weeks ago the campaign "Europe in my region 2017", an initiative aimed at getting the general public informed on the projects funded by the European Community in their area of residence or activity. There are open day events scheduled a bit everywhere, a blog contest, a photo contest, and other initiatives of interest. -->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

20 Percent Of Diagnosed Cancers Are Rare - And That's Good News

May 19, 2017 - 6:11pm
Though well-known cancers like breast and prostate cancer are still the most common, America has gotten really good at diagnosing rare cancers, according to a new study. 

This is a significant achievement, because rare cancers can be challenging to diagnose, often resulting in numerous physician visits, misdiagnoses, and substantial delays in diagnosis. Rare cancers have become an area of priority for some researchers and public health advocates because treatment options are often more limited and less effective than for more common cancers.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

How Urban Trees Increase Ozone

May 18, 2017 - 1:59pm
Though the trend has been to listen to environmental claims about the benefits of trees in cities, in science they have a well-established dark side: in urban cities, they produce a lot of ground-level ozone, the very thing environmentalists spent decades lobbying against.

During hot days, trees emit compounds that worsen ozone, such as formaldehyde, which forms from isoprene, a volatile organic compound that trees can give off when temperatures are hot, and 
terpenes, which also interact with sunlight to create a "natural" smog. If you have witnessed the haze of the Great Smoky Mountains, you are breathing in natural pollution.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

The Ultimate Natural Sunscreen: Thanks, Science!

May 18, 2017 - 1:47pm
A new paper reports the development of nanoparticles that mimic the behavior of natural melanosomes, melanin-producing cell structures that protect our skin, eyes and other tissues from the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Guest Post: Dorigo’s Anomaly! And The Social Psychology Of Professional Discourse In Physics, By Alex Durig

May 17, 2017 - 4:55pm
Dr. Alex Durig (see picture) is a professional freelance writer, with a PhD in social psychology from Indiana University (1992). He has authored seven books in his specialization of perception and logic. He claims to have experienced great frustration resolving his experience of perception and logic when it comes to physics, but he says he no longer feels crazy, ever since Anomaly! was published. So I am offering this space to him to hear what he has to say about that...





------


On Dorigo's Anomaly! and the Social Psychology of Professional Discourse in Physics, by Alex Durig
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

3-D Printed Bioprosthetic Ovaries Produce Healthy Offspring

May 17, 2017 - 2:39pm
Ovaries constructed of 3-D printed scaffolds that house immature eggs were successful in boosting hormone production and restoring fertility by actually ovulating - and they produced healthy offspring which mothers also were able to nurse. 

By removing a female mouse's ovary and replacing it with a bioprosthetic ovary, the mouse was able to not only ovulate but also give birth to healthy pups. The moms were even able to nurse their young.  The bioprosthetic ovaries are constructed of 3-D printed scaffolds that house immature eggs, and have been successful in boosting hormone production and restoring fertility in mice, which was the ultimate goal of the research.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Using Microbes To Convert Natural Gas Into Electricity

May 17, 2017 - 1:39pm
Natural gas has seen a resurgence due to hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") which has allowed geologists and engineers to extract it from wells that were previously considered unusable. CO2 emissions from energy have plummeted back to early 1990s levels and emissions from dirtier forms of energy like coal are back at early 1980s levels.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Association Created Between Texas Weather, Monarch Butterflies And Glyphosate

May 17, 2017 - 11:51am
A paper has linked Monarch butterfly populations to glyphosate - but only when it was first used, and not when it was most heavily used. It also linked the populations to seasonal variation. That is to be expected, except since it's 2017, they try to claim that's climate change rather than wetter weather in some years.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Science Acceptance: Don’t Underestimate The Power Of A Good Cartoon

May 15, 2017 - 7:44pm
Though photos are considered more credible, if you are evangelizing a controversial energy type like wind, a cartoon may appear more persuasive. 

In a recent study, participants were shown one of two versions of the same set of brochures. Each set was designed to debunk a myth about wind energy, the intent being to give readers desired information about wind energy and assuage their concerns. Each pair of brochures was identical in design, text, color, size, etc.

The only difference was that the originally designed brochures featured a beautiful, professional photograph of wind turbines, while the look-alike brochures created for the study swapped out the photograph with a cartoon.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Solar Plus Batteries Will At Least Double The Cost For Electricity

May 15, 2017 - 12:40pm
Solar power is all the rage, at least for government officials who don't understand physics but do spend a lot of time with environmental (and solar panel) lobbyists.

Even in a small country like Belgium, solar can't even meet half of energy needs. In order for it to meet energy needs would require batteries, and that means doubling the cost for the public. If it were implemented in a large country like America, the cost would be astronomical, and that's without adding new transmission lines equivalent to every paved road in the U.S.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Free Range Kids: Most Parents Won't Let Kids Swim In Their Backyard Without Supervision

May 15, 2017 - 11:54am
A new national poll says that parents are in a panic about things like swimming pools.

Least likely to think their kids can swim; black parents. A slight majority of white parents are fine with kids swimming sans parental hovering. Almost all parents think a natural lake (84 percent) or ocean (87 percent) , lacking concrete and a diving board, is too dangerous to be allowed. Only 63 percent would even allow kids to swim in their backyard. 

Granted, pools can be dangerous, with some 5,000 child and teen injuries a year and around 1,000 drowning deaths occurring, but it shows we are bad at evaluating risk. Sharks attack fewer people than cows do, but who do you think parents worry more about after Shark Week?
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Stop The 19th Century Myths: Your Sense Of Smell Is As Good As Your Dog's

May 12, 2017 - 3:33pm
We are at the top of the food chain, but some of our senses got short shrift when it came to other animals. Dogs can hear at frequencies we can't, mantis shrimp got 16 visual pigments and we are stuck with just 3.5, and don't even get other animals started on our pathetic sense of smell.

But a weak nose in humans is really just a 19th century myth that won't go away, like homeopathy and organic food, according to a new analysis. Instead of being limited to a paltry 10,000 odors, humans can discriminate maybe one trillion different ones, the same as dogs and rodents. 
The faulty persistent claim is thanks to Paul Broca, a 19th century brain surgeon and anthropologist as the culprit for the falsehood that humans have an impoverished olfactory system.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

CBC – Controversy Before Credibility

May 11, 2017 - 7:01pm
When did it become okay for the media to be anti-science and anti-agriculture?

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Practical Tools Of The Improvised Speaker

May 10, 2017 - 11:54am

Yesterday I visited the Liceo “Benedetti” of Venice, where 40 students are preparing their artwork for a project of communicating science with art that will culminate in an exhibit at the Palazzo del Casinò of the Lido of Venice, during the week of the EPS conference in July.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Journalists Grieve Death Of Forensic Science Commission

May 9, 2017 - 7:22pm
The National Commission on Forensic Science was dissolved by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a decisive action that brought an end to a highly decorated body of professionals, but one that was frequently stymied by legal gamesmanship and discord.  The commission, a precipitant of the Obama administration's criminal justice reform efforts, was curiously loaded with trial attorneys, law professors, and other academicians but relatively few forensic scientists.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

How Varroa Mites Exploit Beekeeping

May 9, 2017 - 4:00pm
There has been some ongoing concern about bee colonies, even fears of an impending "colony collapse disorder", but both the fears and the causes have been misplaced, recent studies have shown.

Rather than being a mysterious effect due to pesticides (like neonicotinoids) slight variations in bee populations remain the fault of parasites. Yet that brings its own mystery. Varroa mites, the biggest culprit, are not very mobile. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0