Science2.0

Syndicate content
Science 2.0® - Science for the next 2,000 years
Updated: 1 hour 7 min ago

What's Happening With Your Donated Blood And Tissue Sample? Do You Care?

4 hours 40 min ago

When donating blood, plasma, human tissue or any other bodily sample for medical research, most people might not think about how it's being used. But if you were told, would you care?

A new Michigan State University study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, indicates that most people are willing to donate just knowing that their contribution is going toward research. But, when specific scenarios are brought into the equation, that willingness changes.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Corn Co-products From Wet Milling Fine For Pig Diets

4 hours 40 min ago

Many co-products from the corn processing industry may be used in diets fed to pigs. Much attention over the last 10 years has been on co-products produced from the biofuels industry, including distillers dried grains and high-protein distillers grains. However, the wet milling industry also produces many different co-products that may be used in pig diets.

Because little information about co-products produced from the wet milling industry has been reported, research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the nutritional value of four of these co-products so that producers and companies can incorporate these ingredients into swine diets, said Hans H. Stein, a U of I animal science researcher.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Pain From Shots Shows Up In Infant Brain Activity Too

6 hours 10 min ago

It's no surprise that pain shows up in brain scans but a new study finds distinct, consistent patterns of brain activity in response to needles used in vaccinations.

The researchers performed elecroencephalography (EEG) in 15 healthy babies receiving routine vaccinations. A noninvasive and painless procedure, EEG is done to measure electrical activity in the brain, using electrodes placed in specific locations on the scalp.

12 infants were tested during vaccinations at age one to two months, and five at age 12 months.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Bitcoin Scams Steal $11 Million

7 hours 5 min ago

Bitcoin is the digital world's most popular "virtual currency", with millions in circulation. Fraudulent schemes have scammed at least $11 million in these virtual deposits from customers over the past four years, according to new cyber-security research from Southern Methodist University.

In the first empirical study of its kind, the authors found that four different types of schemes using authentic-looking web-based investment and banking outlets lured customers so deposits could be stolen.

As with real money, Bitcoin people were duped with the promise of "get rich quick" schemes, coupled with the inability to judge the legitimacy of web services to decide which financial sites are good or bad.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Is Your Lipstick Causing Early Menopause?

7 hours 37 min ago
by Ian Musgrave, Senior lecturer in Pharmacology at University of Adelaide

I was going to avoid blogging on this topic, but seeing as the story made the Australian with the headline “Chemicals in lipstick and cleaning products linked to early menopause”, I feel I have to weigh in a bit to avoid undue panic and the inevitable dangers of people hurling their lipsticks out the window at great speed. Also, there are issues of science communication and “the dose makes the poison”

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Fewer Wild Fish Needed: Genetically Modified Plants Produce Omega-3 Fish Oil

8 hours 3 min ago
Researchers have revealed that genetically modified Camelina plants produce omega-3 fish oils suitable for feeding Atlantic salmon. The new GMO plants can produce up to 20% of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), one of the two omega-3 LC PUFA conferring health benefits. 

Consumption of omega-3 fish oils, specifically long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 LC-PUFA), through eating oily fish like salmon and mackerel, has been linked with improved cardiovascular health and cognitive development. The primary dietary sources of these fatty acids are wild or farmed fish.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Reconciling Two Models Of Cellular Aging: Understanding The Nuclear Landscape

8 hours 26 min ago
Researchers have mapped the physical structure of the nuclear landscape to better understand changes in genomic interactions occurring in cell senescence and aging.

Their findings have allowed them to reconcile the contradictory observations of two current models of aging: cellular senescence of connective tissue cells called fibroblasts and cellular models of an accelerated aging syndrome.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Doe Porn Make People More Likely To Engage In Unsafe Sexual Behaviors?

9 hours 6 min ago
Risky sexual behaviors such as casual sex, lack of condom use and a high number of sexual partners have been linked to poor health outcomes, including obviously an increased incidence of sexually transmitted infections, in the effects part of the psychological sex equation, but what causes that risky behavior?
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

BICEP2 Found Interstellar Dust, Not Primordial Gravitational Waves

10 hours 7 min ago
The Universe began about 13.8 billion years ago and evolved from an extremely hot, dense and uniform state to the rich and complex cosmos of galaxies, stars and planets we see today. The key source of information about that history is the Cosmic Microwave Background - CMB - the legacy of light emitted only 380 000 years after the Big Bang.

Astronomers have been searching searching for a particular signature of cosmic ‘inflation’ – a very brief accelerated expansion that, according to current theory, the Universe experienced when it was only the tiniest fraction of a second old. This signature would be seeded by gravitational waves, tiny perturbations in the fabric of space-time, that astronomers believe would have been generated during the inflationary phase. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

80 Percent Of Neurosurgeons Now Practice Defensive Medicine

January 31, 2015 - 12:51am
Much of the public think malpractice insurance is a big cost of health care and so they rightly think that if there were reasonable checks on lawsuit judgments health care would be affordable without government intervention.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Infants Create New Knowledge While Sleeping

January 31, 2015 - 12:24am

There is no rest for a baby's brain - not even in sleep. While infants sleep they are reprocessing what they have learned. Working with researchers from the University of Tübingen, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have discovered that babies of the age from 9 to 16 months remember the names of objects better if they had a short nap. And only after sleeping can they transfer learned names to similar new objects. The infant brain thus forms general categories during sleep, converting experience into knowledge.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

New Rapid Test Kit Detects Dengue Antibodies From Saliva

January 30, 2015 - 11:28pm

Finding out whether you have been infected with dengue may soon be as easy as spitting into a rapid test kit. The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) of A*STAR has developed a paper-based disposable device that will allow dengue-specific antibodies to be detected easily from saliva within 20 minutes. This device is currently undergoing further development for commercialization.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Use Of Video Games Correlated To Consumption Of Toxic Substances

January 30, 2015 - 9:12pm
89 percent of young people in one region of Spain own their first mobile phone before they reach the age of 13 and a recent study has analyzed the use of information and communication technologies by using a sample of 5,538 students from the Vallès Occidental region of Catalonia.

The study, based on surveys taken in the 2010/2011 academic year, finds links between school failure and an elevated use of computers at home. It also correlates an intensive use of video devices with the consumption of toxic substances. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Whale Or Dinosaur At The Natural History Museum?

January 30, 2015 - 7:34pm

News that will disappoint loads of children:

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

NWA 7034 - Black Beauty Meteorite May Be 'Bulk Background' Of Mars Crust

January 30, 2015 - 7:18pm
NWA 7034 - Black Beauty - is a meteorite found a few years ago in the Moroccan desert. Now it has been shown to be a 4.4 billion-year-old chunk of the Martian crust, and according to a new analysis, rocks just like it may cover vast swaths of Mars.

In a new paper, scientists report that spectroscopic measurements of the meteorite are a spot-on match with orbital measurements of the Martian dark plains, areas where the planet's coating of red dust is thin and the rocks beneath are exposed. The findings suggest that the meteorite, nicknamed Black Beauty, is representative of the "bulk background" of rocks on the Martian surface, says Kevin Cannon, a Brown University graduate student and lead author of the new paper.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Respiratory Chain: Protein Complex Structure Revealed

January 30, 2015 - 6:49pm

Mitochondria produce ATP, the energy currency of the body. The driver for this process is an electrochemical membrane potential, which is created by a series of proton pumps. These complex, macromolecular machines are collectively known as the respiratory chain. The structure of the largest protein complex in the respiratory chain, that of mitochondrial complex I, has been elucidated by scientists from the Frankfurt "Macromolecular Complexes" cluster of excellence, working together with the University of Freiburg, by X-ray diffraction analysis.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

No, We Have Not Reached Peak Food

January 30, 2015 - 6:12pm
Peak Oil, which was supposed to have happened in 1992, set off the craze of declaring 'peak' everything, to such an extent it is a running joke now.(1)

The good news for Peak Oil believers is that they are going to be right eventually. Oil is a 'fossil' fuel and we aren't making any more giant dinosaurs. Even in the 1970s, when the peak oil date was floated, no one outside environmental doomsday prophets believed it, because it fell victim to the plight of most advocacy-based projections; it created a curve of demand but assumed technology and science, and therefore the supply, would be static. By creating a false metric they concluded all the oil that would ever be found had been found.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

The ATLAS Top Production Asymmetry And One Thing I Do Not Like Of It

January 30, 2015 - 5:11pm
ATLAS sent today to the Cornell arxiv and to the journal JHEP their latest measurement of the top-antitop production asymmetry, and having five free minutes this afternoon I gave a look at the paper, as the measurement is of some interest. The analysis is done generally quite well, but I found out there is one things I do not particularly like in it... It does not affect the result in this case, but the used procedure is error-prone. 

But let's go in order. First I owe you a quick-and-dirty explanation of what is the top asymmetry and why you might care about it.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Calculating The Future Of Solar-fuel Refineries

January 30, 2015 - 7:10am

The process of converting the sun's energy into liquid fuels requires a sophisticated, interrelated series of choices but a solar refinery is especially tricky to map out because the designs involve newly developed or experimental technologies. This makes it difficult to develop realistic plans that are economically viable and energy efficient.

In a paper recently published in the journal Energy & Environmental Science, a team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison chemical and biological engineering Professors Christos Maravelias and George Huber outlined a tool to help engineers better gauge the overall yield, efficiency and costs associated with scaling solar-fuel production processes up into large-scale refineries.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Genetic Links To Size Of Brain Structures Discovered

January 30, 2015 - 7:10am

Five genetic variants that influence the size of structures within the human brain have been discovered by an international team that included a Georgia State University researcher.

In the study led by Drs. Sarah Medland, Margie Wright, Nick Martin and Paul Thompson of the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Australia, nearly 300 researchers analyzed genetic data and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans from 30,717 individuals from around the world. They evaluated genetic data from seven subcortical brain regions (nucleus accumbens, caudate, putamen, pallidum, amygdala, hippocampus and thalamus) and intracranial volume from MRI scans.


read more

Categories: Science2.0