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Wockhardt Is First Indian Pharmaceutical Company To Get FDA QIDP Status

September 2, 2014 - 1:22am
Wockhardt Limited announced that two of its drugs, WCK 771 and WCK 2349, received the coveted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) status from U.S. Food&Drug Administration (FDA).

QIDP status is granted to drugs which act against pathogens which have a high degree of unmet need in their treatment and are identified by the Centers for Disease Control. QIDP status allows for fast track review of the drug application by U.S. FDA, paving way for an early launch. This is the first instance of an Indian Pharmaceutical company receiving a QIDP status.
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Low Carb Vs. Low Fat Diets: Which Is Better?

September 2, 2014 - 12:53am
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Do We Need A Law To Help People Try Experimental Drugs?

September 1, 2014 - 8:00pm

People with life-threatening or incurable diseases may be willing to try experimental drugs and unproven treatments. Credit: juicyrai/Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND

By Tina Cockburn, Queensland University of Technology and Bill Madden, Queensland University of Technology

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Inhibiting Inflammatory Enzyme After Heart Attack Does Not Reduce Risk Of Subsequent Event

September 1, 2014 - 7:12pm

In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event (such as heart attack or unstable angina), use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis) did not reduce the risk of recurrent major coronary events, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.


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New Cancer-Hunting 'Nano-Robots' To Seek And Destroy Tumors

September 1, 2014 - 6:00pm

Nano-robots have cancer in their sights. Credit: StephenMitchell/Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND

By Dr. Jason Liu, Monash University

It sounds like a scene from a science fiction novel – an army of tiny weaponized robots traveling around a human body, hunting down malignant tumours and destroying them from within.

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Neil Tyson On The Politics Of Science Denial

September 1, 2014 - 5:11pm
Spend any time in American science media and you may find some of them are pretty far out of the political mainstream; so far out, they may not even be friends with anyone who has not always voted the same way as them.

So it's unsurprising that much of science media once perpetuated the claim that 'science votes Democrat.'  Humans are fallible and confirmation bias is sneaky. As was apocryphally attributed to New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael after the 1972 Presidential election and a Richard M. Nixon landslide victory, "I don't know how Nixon won. No one I know voted for him." (1)
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Brain Size Matters When It Comes To Remembering

September 1, 2014 - 4:30pm

Want more working memory? Then you need to expand your brain. Credit: Flickr/Elena Gatti, CC BY

By Joel Pearson

Before we had mobile phones, people had to use their own memory to store long phone numbers (or write them down). But getting those numbers into long-term memory could be a real pain.

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Antarctic Sea Level Rising Faster Than Elsewhere

September 1, 2014 - 4:00pm

A new analysis of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2 centimeters more than the global average of 6 centimeters.

Researchers at the University of Southampton detected the rapid rise in sea-level by studying satellite scans of a region that spans more than a million square kilometers. 


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Blood In Urine Can Be Invisible - And It May Indicate Bladder Cancer

September 1, 2014 - 4:00pm

Visible blood in urine is the best known indicator of bladder cancer but new research  finds that invisible blood in urine may be an early warning sign of bladder cancer. 

Scientists at the University of Exeter Medical School found that 1 in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine transpired to have bladder cancer. Thay's about half those who had visible blood in their urine but higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant further investigation. 


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The Sport Science Regime That Helped Boxer Kell Brook Become A World Champion

September 1, 2014 - 3:30pm

Kell Brook and two of the Sheffield Hallam University team. Credit: Sheffield Hallam University.

By Alan Ruddock, Sheffield Hallam University

Amid all the flashing lights, it was a moment of sheer exhilaration when the winner was finally announced: “By a majority decision, the new IBF welterweight champion on the world – Kell Brook.”

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Synaptic Plasticity And Memory In Silent Neurons

September 1, 2014 - 3:30pm

When we learn, we associate a sensory experience with other stimuli or with a certain type of behavior.

The neurons in the cerebral cortex that transmit the information modify the synaptic connections that they have with the other neurons and according to a generally accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical pulse, combined with the signal received from other neurons, acts to stimulate the synapses.


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Caffeine Syndrome: Energy Drinks Linked To Heart Problems

September 1, 2014 - 3:02pm

Energy drinks can cause heart problems according to research presented yesterday at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014 today by Professor Milou-Daniel Drici from France.


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Your Insurer Could Soon Know A Lot More Than How Fast You Drive

September 1, 2014 - 2:53pm


Image credit:  Peter Blanchard via flickr | http://bit.ly/1q1sNlt. Rights information: http://bit.ly/c34Awz

By:  Benjamin Plackett,  Inside Science

(Inside Science) -- It may be unintentional, but it’s possible that your car insurer may know a lot more about where you go than you’d like.

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Tiny Implanted Sensor And Your Smartphone Could Help Prevent Blindness

September 1, 2014 - 2:17pm

Checking for glaucoma. Image credit: communityeyehealth,  CC BY-NC

By David Crabb, City University London

Scientists have proposed a way to monitor glaucoma using a tiny device implanted in the eye. Readings from the device could be monitored by a smartphone. The technology could help prevent some people from going blind.

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Sugar Substance Methylglyoxal Damages Good HDL Cholesterol - Study

September 1, 2014 - 1:54pm

A new study finds that 'good' cholesterol is damaged by a sugar-derived substance, methylglyoxal (MG), was found to damage the 'good' cholesterol High Density Lipoprotein - HDL - which removes excess levels of bad cholesterol from the body.

Methylglyoxal is formed from glucose in the body. It is 40,000 times more reactive than glucose and damages arginine residue (amino acid) in HDL at functionally important site causing the particle to become unstable.


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Abortions Don’t Cause Cancer Any More Than Parties Do

August 31, 2014 - 8:00pm
Research that found links between abortion and breast cancer also found men who had 'much opportunity to participate in parties' were more likely to have stomach cancer. Credit: burningmax/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA

By Louise Keogh, University of Melbourne

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Ethno-Psychiatry: How The British Treated "Hardcore" Women In The Mau Mau Rebellion

August 31, 2014 - 6:00pm
New research on the treatment of 'hardcore' female Mau Mau prisoners by the British in the late 1950s sheds new light on how ideas about gender, deviancy and mental health shaped colonial practices of punishment.

The treatment of the Mau Mau by the British has led to compensation claims in the courts. Last year the British government agreed to pay out £19.9m in costs and compensation to more than 5,000 elderly Kenyans who suffered torture and abuse during the Mau Mau uprising in the 50s. Two of those involved in the recent case were women and further female compensation cases are pending.
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Cut Greenhouse Gases Using Microbes

August 31, 2014 - 6:00pm

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that is also responsible for destroying the ozone layer. 

INRA researchers in Dijon have shown that the ability of soils to eliminate N2O can mainly be explained by the diversity and abundance of a new group of micro-organisms that are capable of transforming it into atmospheric nitrogen (N2). The results underline the importance of microbial diversity to the functioning of soils and the services they deliver.

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How The Higgs Became The Target Of Run 2 At The Tevatron

August 31, 2014 - 5:45pm
Until the second half of the nineties, when the LEP collider started to be upgraded to investigate higher centre-of-mass energies of electron-positron collisions than those until then produced at the Z mass, the Higgs boson was not the main focus of experiments exploring the high-energy frontier. The reason is that the expected cross section of that particle was prohibitively small for the comparatively low luminosities provided by the facilities available at the time. Of course, one could still look for anomalously high-rate production of final states possessing the characteristics of a Higgs boson decay; but those searches had a limited appeal.
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Dehumanization Of Women? Jack The Ripper's Forgotten Victims

August 31, 2014 - 5:09pm
Jack The Ripper is famous - everyone in the Western world has heard of the unsolved case of the Whitechapel serial killer who preyed on prostitutes for a few months in 1888.

There were only five (or six) of those murders almost 130 years ago yet today there are 17 different grisly tours in London's East End about them. 
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