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Updated: 44 min 40 sec ago

Will Female Viagra Be An FDA Boner?

6 hours 24 min ago
First of all, let me state that my conscience is perfectly clear:

However, unlike yours truly, if you have an impure mind I suggest you take it up with Merriam-Webster.

Having dispensed with that trivial distraction, can someone please explain to me what is going on below? 
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Enjoy Sugar Again: High Carb Diet On Par With Caloric Restriction In Boosting Health

11 hours 19 min ago
Caloric restriction in mice has been touted for accomplishing everything from increasing longevity to lowering cholesterol, but those animals are weaned on that from birth, and humans will go to jail trying it with their children.

It may be unnecessary - and the diet advice we have gotten for the last 30 years may be also. A new study found that a diet of high carbohydrates and low protein - the opposite of what has been recommended - improves insulin sensitivity and can provide benefits similar to those obtained with calorie restriction.
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CSI 430,000 B.C. - A Murder Mystery?

12 hours 54 min ago
Lethal wounds identified on a human skull may indicate one of the first cases of murder in human history, according to a new paper.

The archaeological site, Sima de los Huesos in northern Spain, is located deep within an underground cave system and contains the skeletal remains of at least 28 individuals that date to around 430,000 years ago, during the Middle Pleistocene. The only access to the site is through a 13-meter deep vertical shaft, and how the human bodies arrived there remains a mystery.
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How Public Relations Turned Dunkirk From Catastrophe Into Cultural Icon

13 hours 14 min ago
For most British people the Dunkirk evacuation between May 26 and June 4 1940 was the most significant early event of World War II.

And in the 75 years since those momentous events it has come to occupy, in Penny Summerfield’s words, “an iconic place in British culture”.

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McDonald's Still Rules Limited Edition Foods

13 hours 44 min ago
McDonald's may have taken a hit when it comes to revenue growth lately but when it comes to Limited Edition events, they have no peers.

Everyone has heard of the McRib and Shamrock Shakes, maybe Starbucks customers can name a Pumpkin Spice Latte, but after that it is really reaching. A survey of over 6,000 people showed that McDonald's locked down the two spots on the list of top-five favorite limited edition foods of all time but everyone else needs to make up some ground.

Very few could name Mountain Dews' Baja Blast or Oreos' Red Velvet cookies without being prompted. 
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Grading The President's Strategy To Promote Bee Health

14 hours 3 min ago

In 2006 there was a serious decline in the number of honey bee colonies in parts of Europe and the United States and it brought renewed concern about another Colony Collapse Disorder, which had last occurred in the mid-1990s.

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The Albian Gap And A Heated Debate

14 hours 14 min ago
Salt rock behaves as a fluid and can play a pivotal role in the large-scale, long-term collapse of the world's continental margins. However, the precise way in which this occurs is laced in controversy; nowhere is this controversy more apparent than along the Brazilian continental margin, where the origin of a feature called "the Albian Gap" has generated much heated debate over several decades.

Albian Gap is a zone in the Santos Basin, offshore Brazil, up to 75 kilometers wide and within which the Albian section is missing. 
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Index Of School Readiness Highlights Importance Of Family Support

14 hours 44 min ago
The U.K. government has indicated that it wishes to introduce testing for all children at Reception (when they first enter school at age four) this year. These tests seek to provide baseline assessments of a child’s ‘school readiness’ but teacher unions have criticized testing as being too narrowly focused and likely to add to the difficulties of an already challenging period for both children and their teachers.
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DIY Prosthetics: How An Athlete Who Wanted To Ski Again Built A New Kind Of Knee

15 hours 14 min ago

When Brian Bartlett was 24 he was hit by a car from behind so hard it ripped his right leg off instantly. It all happened so fast. He doesn’t like to talk about it. “You really can’t understand,” he told me. “There’s just no way to…until you have an injury where you’re ripped or cut apart instantly.”

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The Serious Physics Of Super Balls

15 hours 14 min ago
By Joel Shurkin, Inside Science -- Super Balls are toys beloved by children because of their extraordinary ability to bounce. Physicists love them for exactly the same reason.

Drop a baseball on the floor and it will hardly bounce at all. Drop a Super Ball from shoulder height, and it will bounce back 92 percent of the way to the drop-off point. Super Balls also are just as bouncy vertically as they are horizontally, and they spin oddly.

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"Boys With Toys" - Was It Sexist?

May 28, 2015 - 3:04am

I was initially rather excited to see that one of my friends and collaborators, Professor Shri Kulkarni from Caltech, had his picture littering my Facebook feed recently.

Unfortunately for Shri, it was because in an interview with National Public Radio he had described many scientists as secretly being “boys with toys”. Worse, he had said “You’re not supposed to say that”, which indicated that although it might be controversial, he said it anyway – which is typical of Shri.

There are many ways to interpret Shri’s comment, one is that scientists are boys, but as it turns out that is not what Shri meant.

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American Indian Students Disproportionately Disciplined Compared To White Students

May 28, 2015 - 2:57am

School disciplinary actions handed down to students at Utah public schools disproportionately impact American Indian children over all other ethnicities enrolled in the state's public education system, new research from the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Public Policy Clinic reveals.


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Head Injuries Could Result In Neurodegenerative Disease In Rugby Union Players

May 28, 2015 - 2:57am

A new article publishing online today in the Quarterly Journal of Medicine has reported the first case showing an association between exposure to head injuries in rugby union players and an increased risk in neurodegenerative disease.

Until now, the association between head injuries and neurodegenerative disease, specifically chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), has predominantly been made with boxers. However Dr Michael Farrell and colleagues have presented the first comprehensive case report of CTE in a former amateur rugby union player, who died six years after displaying the first symptoms of neurological decline at age 57.


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Could Better Psychology Tests Have Predicted The Germanwings Suicide Crash?

May 27, 2015 - 10:03pm
When people do terrible things, it seems reasonable to believe we should have taken steps to identify them beforehand. If we can do that, then surely we can prevent them from doing harm.

The crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 in March, which appears to have been an intentional act, is an example. It shocks us (and understandably so) when a trusted professional harms those who have entrusted their lives to him or her.

So why not identify pilots at risk and take steps to prevent similar events from ever occurring again?

Because it is likely impossible, and maybe even counterproductive.

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Orion Through The Camera — But Which Type?

May 27, 2015 - 9:16pm
Recently on Countryfile (BBC) was saw a presenter and a photographer together in the Pennines, the mountains that form the ‘backbone’ of England.  The photographer makes a living by taking spectacular scenes with a high-end camera and all different lenses, whereas the presenter was comparing what she took with her mobile. 

He was worried that in the public domain the best images would be lost in a massive cloud which includes a lot of inferior (though he didn’t specifically use the word) data.

This clicked with me, because of my experience of attempting astrophotography with what is known as a ‘bridge’ camera, somewhat between a compact and an SLR.
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Australopithecus Deyiremeda: New Human Ancestor In Ethiopia

May 27, 2015 - 8:34pm
A new fossil hominid species has been discovered in the site of Woranso-Mille in the central region of Afar, in Ethiopia.

The new species is named Australopithecus deyiremeda and consists of the upper and  lower jaws and a collection of teeth in the sites of Burtele and Wayteleyta, in Woranso-Mille, in the central region of Afar, about 50 kilometers north of Hadar and 520 kilometres northeast of the capital Addis Ababa. The fossil specimens are 3.3 – 3.5 million-years-old.
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Red Lady: Religious Symbolism In A Paleolithic Tomb?

May 27, 2015 - 8:27pm
The Red Lady burial site in El Mirón cave, outside Ramales de la Victoria in Cantabria, Spain, dates back to the Upper Palaeolithic 16,000 years ago. The archaeological site was discovered in 1903 but it wasn't until 2010 that bones were discovered at the back of the cave, in a small space between the wall and a fallen block. Both the bones and the sediment under them were reddish.

The remains turned out to be of a woman, between 35 and 40 years of age, and because of the color the Red Lady mystery was born. The reddish color means the use of ochre and ochre has been linked to religious symbolism in various cultures.
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Handsome Men Do Catch More Breaks From Women

May 27, 2015 - 5:19pm
Women are a lot more likely to put up with misbehavior in a man if he looks like Ryan Gosling, but if he is ugly, shunning will happen much quicker, according to a paper by Jeremy Gibson and Jonathan Gore of Eastern Kentucky University, who found that a woman’s view of how law-abiding a man is can be influenced by how handsome he is.

'First impressions' are a popular field of study because of their role in forming relationships, but it is often based on physical appearance and adherence to social norms. First impressions can be misleading and when someone is getting a positive reaction, a “halo effect” it can help them in many ways. Likewise, the opposite can occur for unattractive traits.
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Antidepressants More Effective Than Assumed

May 27, 2015 - 4:15pm

Many have questioned the efficacy of the common antidepressant medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

They don't work for many people, studies have found, and even when they work they lose effectiveness quickly. Psychiatric medications have also been the common denominators in tragedies like mass shootings, which has increased concern about whether or not it is better to be depressed than homicidal.


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Traditional Medicine: Thunder God Vine As Potential Obesity Treatment

May 27, 2015 - 4:09pm

An extract from the thunder god vine, long used in traditional Chinese medicine, reduces food intake and causes up to a 45% decrease in body weight in obese mice. The weight-loss compound, called Celastrol, produces its potent effects by enhancing the action of an appetite-suppressing hormone called leptin. The findings are an early indicator that Celastrol could be developed into a drug for the treatment of obesity.


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