Science 2.0

Subscribe to Science 2.0 feed
Science 2.0® - Science for the next 2,000 years
Updated: 14 min 5 sec ago

No, Computer Programs Are Not About To Take Over The World - Stephen Hawking's Speech & Mindlessness Of Chatbots

Nov 07 2017 - 20:11

This is a speech Stephen Hawking gave. It’s actually an upbeat and optimistic speech, but one particular phrase from the speech is scaring many people. Stephen Hawking has a love of the dramatic, and he often way over states things - it's what they call hyperbole, overstating things for emotional effect. I'm also surprised that amongst all the news articles running stories about it, I haven't found a single one that is skeptical of his beliefs or even suggest there could be other views on the matter. 

As he stated it, 

-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Antarctic Volcano Role In Warming Was Understated

Nov 07 2017 - 18:11
There is additional evidence a mantle plume, basically a geothermal heat source such as a volcano, is below Antarctica's Marie Byrd Land and it explains a substantial amount of the melting that creates lakes and rivers under the ice sheet. 

Mantle plumes are thought to be narrow streams of hot rock rising through Earth's mantle and spreading out like a mushroom cap under the crust. The buoyancy of the material, some of it molten, causes the crust to bulge upward. The theory of mantle plumes was proposed in the 1970s to explain geothermal activity that occurs far from the boundary of a tectonic plate, such as Hawaii and Yellowstone. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Defeating ISIS Is Good For The Environment

Nov 06 2017 - 20:11

Life in the so-called Islamic State (ISIS) is not exactly paradise. Children are indoctrinated, women are severely oppressed, and infidels are beheaded. Ancient cultural artifacts and historical treasures are destroyed. Liberating people conquered by ISIS, therefore, is good not only for humanitarian reasons but for archaeological ones, as well.

Now, it appears there is yet another reason to defeat ISIS: It might be good for the planet.

A new study published by Princeton University and the World Bank shows that oil production in ISIS-controlled areas has fallen by over 70%, from 56,000 barrels per day in December 2014 to 16,000 barrels per day in 2016.

-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Things That Can Decay To Boson Pairs

Nov 06 2017 - 07:11
Writing a serious review of research in particle physics is a refreshing job - all the things that you already knew on that specific topic once sat on a fuzzy cloud somewhere in your brain, and now find their place in a tidily organized space, with clear interdependence among them. That's what I am experiencing as I progress with a 60-pageish thing on hadron collider searches for diboson resonances, which will appear sometime next year in a very high impact factor journal. -->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Google News Without The Nibiru Nonsense

Nov 04 2017 - 12:11

To see the problem try a google news search for Planet X - and see if you find anything there about the genuine astronomical search for planets beyond Neptune. It's filled with stories saying that the nonsense planet Nibiru is about to fly past Earth or hit us (what professor Brian Cox once called the imaginary bullshit planet Nibiru).

-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Gender Inequality In Science Salaries - Physics Blamed

Nov 04 2017 - 07:11
Physics Today says the culture of physics itself is to blame for the gender pay gap.  
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Drug Threat Is 'Unprecedented' According To Forensic Experts

Nov 03 2017 - 14:11
Today, the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors issued a an urgent public alert regarding the dangers posed by drugs currently circulating America’s streets and neighborhoods as a result of the current opioid crisis.   This alert is intended to help the public recognize and avoid suspicious materials when they are nearby.

“The threat is unprecedented,” warns ASCLD President Ray Wickenheiser. “Some of the clandestine substances being sold or made accessible have formulations that are so toxic that it’s better to consider them poison.”
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

What Killed Dinosaurs May Kill Cancer Cells Too

Nov 03 2017 - 12:11
The world’s second densest metal can be used to kill cancer cells by filling them with a deadly version of oxygen, without harming healthy tissue, according to a new paper.

The metal, iridium, was in the asteroid with the strongest link to the extinction of dinosaurs. When combined with organic material, the researchers showed it can be directly targeted towards cancerous cells, transferring energy to the cells to turn the oxygen (O2) inside them into singlet oxygen, which is poisonous and kills the cell - without harming any healthy tissue.
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Computer Scientist Mark Jacobson Can't Sue His Way To Competence

Nov 03 2017 - 09:11
Starting Science 2.0 in 2006, I was as wide-eyed as anyone new to media could be.  My first month I was sure we were about to discover life on other planets, cancer was going to be cured, chocolate was healthy, resveratrol was the one polyphenol to rule them all. Oh, and academic scientists were going to rush to write for the public because I loved science. (1) 
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Tapanuli: A Third Orangutan Species Exists

Nov 02 2017 - 15:11
Move over, Bornean and the Sumatran orangutans. Scholars have identified a third orangutan species, the Tapanuli orangutan, that sits alongside the Pongo abelii, living on the island of Sumatra, and the Pongo pygmeaeus, endemic to Borneo, on the evolutionary tree.
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Cosmic Rays Reveal New Hidden Room In The Great Pyramid

Nov 02 2017 - 11:11
The Great Pyramid, built under the command of the Pharaoh Cheops (who died around 2483 B.C.), retains a lot of mysteries. We don't know how it was built, which has led to any number of conspiracy stories about alien technology and other things.

Alien stuff has actually been able to help now, in the form of muons, by-products of cosmic rays which can be absorbed by stone. Using cosmic-ray muon radiography, a new study showed how researchers were able to non-invasively discover a previously unknown large room - its cross-section is similar to the Grand Gallery, so it is at least 90 feet long - above the Grand Gallery.
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Palm Oil And Rainforests: Companies Are Abandoning Commitments, Says Group

Nov 01 2017 - 14:11
A San Francisco activist group claims major candy and snack manufacturers have deceived consumers by promising to clean up their palm oil supply chains, but these promises have been delayed, revised or watered down.

Palm Oil is a common vegetable oil, Nutella famously said their product won't be popular without it, and it has replaced partially hydrogenated oils in many uses due to higher yields than plants like rapeseed and sunflower plus stability at high temperature. But the popularity has come at a price. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

These Minority Groups Have Alarmingly High Rates Of Obesity And Diabetes

Nov 01 2017 - 12:11

Though there are often conversations about the health of larger minority groups such as African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans, smaller groups are a real worry for an increasingly overburdened government health care system. 

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Darwin's Aliens: Extraterrestrials Could Be More Like Us Than We Think

Nov 01 2017 - 10:11

When we search the cosmos for evidence we are not the first advanced life form, we look for things that we could share in common. This anthropomorphism is common in culture, in everything from science studies to science-fiction. And it may not be wrong.

Assuming we have any extra-terrestrial neighbors, far less popular is the idea that we will be the advanced civilization new ones are terrified about being invaded by, they will likely have undergone natural selection just like we did. In the video game Spore, almost everyone evolved creatures that were purple and had huge eyes, despite trying to do things randomly, and that may happen on other planets also.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Wealthier Minorities Face More Discrimination And It's Being Blamed For Worse Health

Nov 01 2017 - 09:11

Rich people are more likely to shop at Whole Foods, buy supplements, vote for a particular political party and...racially discriminate against minorities? That last part is according to a new sociology paper which will force some inconvenient questions about race and money in America.

Though it is commonly believed that wealth leads to better health and less discrimination, wealthier African- and Latino-Americans report more racial discrimination than poor ones, according to survey results. Meanwhile, as whites became more wealthy they report improved health.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Genetically Engineered Wheat Can Boost Food Security

Oct 31 2017 - 15:10

Though genetically engineering food using science remains controversial in some circles, with concerns about genetically modified corn syrup in candy and claims that CRISPR can somehow be harmful whereas mutagenesis-derived foods can be labeled organic, progress marches on.

We're on our way to 9 million people and existing agriculture could easily handle it...if great agricultural land were evenly distributed. But is isn't evenly distributed, which is why the US and Europe can have robust markets for food created using an organic-certification process. Yield does not matter, just profit margins do, when land grows food easily.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Helmet Use In Baseball And Softball: Is Compliance Up?

Oct 30 2017 - 18:10

Traumatic brain injuries in baseball and softball are down, but they were not really all that high to begin with, and that may be why there is poor compliance overall with helmet use and return-to-play guidelines following concerns about a concussion.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

The Future Of The LHC, And The Human Factor

Oct 30 2017 - 18:10
Today at CERN a workshop started on the physics of the High-Luminosity and High-Energy phases of Large Hadron Collider operations. This is a three-days event meant at preparing the ground for the decision on which, among several possible scenarios that have been pictured for the future of particle physics in Europe, will be the one on which the European Community will invest in the next few decades. The so-called "European Strategy for particle physics" will be decided in a couple of years, but getting the hard data on which to base that crucial decision is today's job. 

Some context
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Canadian Journal Claims E-Cigarettes Cause High School Student Smoking

Oct 30 2017 - 16:10

Surveys of students in two Canadian provinces have led scholars to warn that e-cigarettes, also called vaping, are causing cigarette uptake in high school students.

This will be a surprise to American and British public health officials, who know cigarette smoking has plummeted and even among those who get hooked, vaping is considered a viable harm reduction and smoking cessation alternative.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Bias Against Men When It Comes To Depression Treatment

Oct 30 2017 - 15:10

Though men account for the overwhelming majority of suicides and have increasingly sought help for depression, the clinical community has yet to figure out how to better help them. 

A new pilot study from Australia shows the extent of the problem. Men report that instead of receiving tailored treatment regimens more suited toward them, the clinical community seems to take a one-size-fits-all-genders unstructured talk therapy approach. Few gave their clients goals to work towards or outlined skills they could gain to deal with their depression, which was the opposite of the action-oriented, functional treatment the men were most often seeking. 

read more

Categories: Science 2.0