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Hunters, Fishers Object To Weakened EPA Rules In Alaska

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 9:58pm
Environmentalists generally regard people as the enemy, but that is a mythology only held by urban fundraisers working for environmental corporations. In actuality, sportsmen are some of the biggest protectors of the environment. They are even more protective of the environmental than the US Environmental Protection Agency, they are just more practical and not motivated by the latest political fads.


Photo credit: Brendan Burns.
Link: Sportsman's Alliance for Alaska.
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Hunters, Fishers Object To Weakened EPA Rules In Alaska

General - April 20, 2014 - 9:58pm
Environmentalists generally regard people as the enemy, but that is a mythology only held by urban fundraisers working for environmental corporations. In actuality, sportsmen are some of the biggest protectors of the environment. They are even more protective of the environmental than the US Environmental Protection Agency, they are just more practical and not motivated by the latest political fads.


Photo credit: Brendan Burns.
Link: Sportsman's Alliance for Alaska.
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Categories: News

Earth Day: Illegal Immigration Is Killing The Environment, Says Group

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 9:10pm
Between 2000 and 2010, native-born Californians had fewer children and a giant chunk of the middle class fled the state, but California's population still grew by 3,390,000.
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Earth Day: Illegal Immigration Is Killing The Environment, Says Group

General - April 20, 2014 - 9:10pm
Between 2000 and 2010, native-born Californians had fewer children and a giant chunk of the middle class fled the state, but California's population still grew by 3,390,000.
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Categories: News

This Cell Is The Source Of Most Cases Of Invasive Bladder Cancer

General - April 20, 2014 - 7:23pm

A new study conducted in mice has implicated a single type of cell, in the lining of the bladder, as responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer.

The study is the first to pinpoint the normal cell type that can give rise to invasive bladder cancers and the first to show that most bladder cancers and their associated precancerous lesions arise from just one cell, which would also explain why many human bladder cancers recur after therapy.


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This Cell Is The Source Of Most Cases Of Invasive Bladder Cancer

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 7:23pm

A new study conducted in mice has implicated a single type of cell, in the lining of the bladder, as responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer.

The study is the first to pinpoint the normal cell type that can give rise to invasive bladder cancers and the first to show that most bladder cancers and their associated precancerous lesions arise from just one cell, which would also explain why many human bladder cancers recur after therapy.


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Bulletproof Nuclei? Stem Cells Exhibit Unusual Absorption Property

General - April 20, 2014 - 7:20pm

Stem cells – the body's master cells – demonstrate a bizarre property never before seen at a cellular level, according to a study published today from scientists at the University of Cambridge. The property – known as auxeticity – is one which may have application as wide-ranging as soundproofing, super-absorbent sponges and bulletproof vests.


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Categories: News

Bulletproof Nuclei? Stem Cells Exhibit Unusual Absorption Property

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 7:20pm

Stem cells – the body's master cells – demonstrate a bizarre property never before seen at a cellular level, according to a study published today from scientists at the University of Cambridge. The property – known as auxeticity – is one which may have application as wide-ranging as soundproofing, super-absorbent sponges and bulletproof vests.


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The Slow Decline Of Biofuels - Corn Stover Inclusion Won't Help

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 6:58pm

Biofuels - ethanol - were trumpeted as being a renewable alternative to fossil fuels for decades. Finally, in 2005, it got the mandates and subsidies environmentalists insisted were necessary to make inroads against a mature industry like petroleum.

Immediately, what scientists knew became evident - they were more resource intensive to produce, were no better for emissions, and subsidies insured there was no reason to get more efficient. Worse, the gold rush of government money drove up corn prices, unfairly impacting the poor.


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Categories: Science2.0

The Slow Decline Of Biofuels - Corn Stover Inclusion Won't Help

General - April 20, 2014 - 6:58pm

Biofuels - ethanol - were trumpeted as being a renewable alternative to fossil fuels for decades. Finally, in 2005, it got the mandates and subsidies environmentalists insisted were necessary to make inroads against a mature industry like petroleum.

Immediately, what scientists knew became evident - they were more resource intensive to produce, were no better for emissions, and subsidies insured there was no reason to get more efficient. Worse, the gold rush of government money drove up corn prices, unfairly impacting the poor.


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Categories: News

Genetic Anticipation: Bad News Is Good News For Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 6:24pm
In biology, anticipation is the term for genetic diseases caused by an abnormal repeat in DNA that becomes more severe with each new generation.

Now there is a twist. A study has found the existence of anticipation in diseases caused by different errors - not a DNA repeat - in fatal neurodegenerative disorder Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (FAP).
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Genetic Anticipation: Bad News Is Good News For Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy

General - April 20, 2014 - 6:24pm
In biology, anticipation is the term for genetic diseases caused by an abnormal repeat in DNA that becomes more severe with each new generation.

Now there is a twist. A study has found the existence of anticipation in diseases caused by different errors - not a DNA repeat - in fatal neurodegenerative disorder Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (FAP).
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Reproduce Or Conquer The World? Bacterial Adventures In Theoretical Biophysics

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 2:42pm
The bacterium Bacillus subtilis is quite adaptable, it moves about in liquids and on agar surfaces by means of flagella and alternatively, it can just stick to an underlying substrate. 

The bacteria proliferate most effectively in this stationary state, while motile bacteria reproduce at a noticably lower rate.

In order to sustain and extend the colony, bacteria primarily require sufficient nutrients. Moving slowly means that nutrients are soon used up, but adventurous bacteria that decide to move out fast in search for a microbial Cockaigne may end up feeling lonely.

Which strategy offers the best prospects for the organisms? Should one specialize in growth or migration, or be a generalist and steer a balanced course?
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Categories: Science2.0

Reproduce Or Conquer The World? Bacterial Adventures In Theoretical Biophysics

General - April 20, 2014 - 2:42pm
The bacterium Bacillus subtilis is quite adaptable, it moves about in liquids and on agar surfaces by means of flagella and alternatively, it can just stick to an underlying substrate. 

The bacteria proliferate most effectively in this stationary state, while motile bacteria reproduce at a noticably lower rate.

In order to sustain and extend the colony, bacteria primarily require sufficient nutrients. Moving slowly means that nutrients are soon used up, but adventurous bacteria that decide to move out fast in search for a microbial Cockaigne may end up feeling lonely.

Which strategy offers the best prospects for the organisms? Should one specialize in growth or migration, or be a generalist and steer a balanced course?
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Categories: News

Cohort Study - Avoiding Foods Early Leads To More Allergies

Science2.0 - April 20, 2014 - 1:36pm
A long-term study of a cohort of young people, 12,000 people now six years old, from Iceland to Greece, who have been tracked from birth and whose diets and allergies have been recorded, is evaluating maternal diet’s impact on food allergy in later life is expected to uncover causes of allergy in children.

Some pointers are already evident, they note. Compared to the UK, Israeli children typically eat nuts at an earlier age and have fewer allergies, which suggests that such dietary habits may have a protective effect against nut allergies later on. “This means that the current advice that young children should avoid nuts may make things worse,” says Clare Mills, professor of allergy in the Institute of Inflammation and Repair at the University of Manchester.
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Categories: Science2.0

Cohort Study - Avoiding Foods Early Leads To More Allergies

General - April 20, 2014 - 1:36pm
A long-term study of a cohort of young people, 12,000 people now six years old, from Iceland to Greece, who have been tracked from birth and whose diets and allergies have been recorded, is evaluating maternal diet’s impact on food allergy in later life is expected to uncover causes of allergy in children.

Some pointers are already evident, they note. Compared to the UK, Israeli children typically eat nuts at an earlier age and have fewer allergies, which suggests that such dietary habits may have a protective effect against nut allergies later on. “This means that the current advice that young children should avoid nuts may make things worse,” says Clare Mills, professor of allergy in the Institute of Inflammation and Repair at the University of Manchester.
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Categories: News

Scientists Discover Brain's Anti-distraction System

General - April 19, 2014 - 9:53pm

Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors' perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.

This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.

The Journal of Neuroscience has just published a paper about the discovery by John McDonald, an associate professor of psychology and his doctoral student John Gaspar, who made the discovery during his master's thesis research.


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Categories: News

Scientists Discover Brain's Anti-distraction System

Science2.0 - April 19, 2014 - 9:53pm

Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors' perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.

This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.

The Journal of Neuroscience has just published a paper about the discovery by John McDonald, an associate professor of psychology and his doctoral student John Gaspar, who made the discovery during his master's thesis research.


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Categories: Science2.0

New Research Shows People Are Thinking About Their Health Early In The Week

General - April 19, 2014 - 9:52pm

San Diego, Calif. (April 18, 2014) ― A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine analyzing weekly patterns in health-related Google searches reveals a recurring pattern that could be leveraged to improve public health strategies.

Investigators from San Diego State University, the Santa Fe Institute, Johns Hopkins University, and the Monday Campaigns, analyzed "healthy" Google searches (searches that included the term healthy and were indeed health-related, e.g., "healthy diet") originating in the U.S. from 2005 to 2012. They found that on average, searches for health topics were 30 percent more frequent at the beginning of the week than on days later in the week, with the lowest average number of searches on Saturday.


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Categories: News

New Research Shows People Are Thinking About Their Health Early In The Week

Science2.0 - April 19, 2014 - 9:52pm

San Diego, Calif. (April 18, 2014) ― A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine analyzing weekly patterns in health-related Google searches reveals a recurring pattern that could be leveraged to improve public health strategies.

Investigators from San Diego State University, the Santa Fe Institute, Johns Hopkins University, and the Monday Campaigns, analyzed "healthy" Google searches (searches that included the term healthy and were indeed health-related, e.g., "healthy diet") originating in the U.S. from 2005 to 2012. They found that on average, searches for health topics were 30 percent more frequent at the beginning of the week than on days later in the week, with the lowest average number of searches on Saturday.


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Categories: Science2.0