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Violent Immersion: How 3-D Gaming Affects Player Emotions

Science2.0 - October 22, 2014 - 1:42am

Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real –  and in a new study researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than people who played games on 2-D systems. 

That may have troubling consequences for young players, according to an upcoming paper in Psychology of Popular Media Culture.


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Violent Immersion: How 3-D Gaming Affects Player Emotions

General - October 22, 2014 - 1:42am

Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real –  and in a new study researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than people who played games on 2-D systems. 

That may have troubling consequences for young players, according to an upcoming paper in Psychology of Popular Media Culture.


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Slavery In America: Back In The Headlines

Science2.0 - October 22, 2014 - 12:30am

The Slave Trade painted by a French abolitionist artist.

By Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas

People think they know everything about slavery in the United States, but they don’t.

They think the majority of African slaves came to the American colonies, but they didn’t. They talk about 400 hundred years of slavery, but it wasn’t. They claim all Southerners owned slaves, but they didn’t. Some argue it was a long time ago, but it wasn’t.

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Slavery In America: Back In The Headlines

General - October 22, 2014 - 12:30am

The Slave Trade painted by a French abolitionist artist.

By Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas

People think they know everything about slavery in the United States, but they don’t.

They think the majority of African slaves came to the American colonies, but they didn’t. They talk about 400 hundred years of slavery, but it wasn’t. They claim all Southerners owned slaves, but they didn’t. Some argue it was a long time ago, but it wasn’t.

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Integrated Science Instrument Module: Webb Telescope's Heart Survives Deep Freeze Test

Science2.0 - October 22, 2014 - 12:00am

Though it has been in the works since 1996 and long passed both its original 2011 completion date and even the most aggressive budget estimate, the James Webb Space Telescope has a milestone that may get people excited: after 116 days of extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.


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Integrated Science Instrument Module: Webb Telescope's Heart Survives Deep Freeze Test

General - October 22, 2014 - 12:00am

Though it has been in the works since 1996 and long passed both its original 2011 completion date and even the most aggressive budget estimate, the James Webb Space Telescope has a milestone that may get people excited: after 116 days of extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.


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In Defense Of NIMBY-ism

Science2.0 - October 21, 2014 - 11:30pm

It's easy to sneer at people for protecting their backyards, but what if there's a compelling reason to do so? Mickey DeRham photos, CC BY-NC

By Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University.

The term NIMBY – “not in my back yard"– has long been used to criticize people who oppose commercial or industrial development in their communities. Invariably pejorative, it casts citizens as selfish individualists who care only for themselves, hypocrites who want the benefits of modernity without paying its costs.

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In Defense Of NIMBY-ism

General - October 21, 2014 - 11:30pm

It's easy to sneer at people for protecting their backyards, but what if there's a compelling reason to do so? Mickey DeRham photos, CC BY-NC

By Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University.

The term NIMBY – “not in my back yard"– has long been used to criticize people who oppose commercial or industrial development in their communities. Invariably pejorative, it casts citizens as selfish individualists who care only for themselves, hypocrites who want the benefits of modernity without paying its costs.

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Perception Of Hatred Fuels Conflicts Between Democrats And Republicans

Science2.0 - October 21, 2014 - 11:00pm

There are some things that Republicans and Democrats share in common with Palestinians and Israelis and lots of other groups where human conflict seems intractable.

A new sociology paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says that seemingly unsolvable political and ethnic conflicts are fueled by asymmetrical perceptions of opponents' motivations, and that these tensions can be relieved by providing financial incentives to better understand what drives an adversary group.


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Perception Of Hatred Fuels Conflicts Between Democrats And Republicans

General - October 21, 2014 - 11:00pm

There are some things that Republicans and Democrats share in common with Palestinians and Israelis and lots of other groups where human conflict seems intractable.

A new sociology paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says that seemingly unsolvable political and ethnic conflicts are fueled by asymmetrical perceptions of opponents' motivations, and that these tensions can be relieved by providing financial incentives to better understand what drives an adversary group.


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Ebola In The USA: Don't Trust What You Read On Twitter

General - October 21, 2014 - 10:30pm

Think twice before you over-react. Image: Jim Bourg/Reuters

By Alfred Hermida, University of British Columbia

Whatever you do, don’t turn to Twitter for news about Ebola.

The volume and tone of tweets and retweets about the disease will make you wish you were watching the zombie apocalypse of The Walking Dead instead. It is much less scary.

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Ebola In The USA: Don't Trust What You Read On Twitter

Science2.0 - October 21, 2014 - 10:30pm

Think twice before you over-react. Image: Jim Bourg/Reuters

By Alfred Hermida, University of British Columbia

Whatever you do, don’t turn to Twitter for news about Ebola.

The volume and tone of tweets and retweets about the disease will make you wish you were watching the zombie apocalypse of The Walking Dead instead. It is much less scary.

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Biological Clock: Graveyard Shift Workers Might Want To Skip High-Iron Foods

Science2.0 - October 21, 2014 - 10:00pm

Disrupted circadian clocks are listed as a possible reason that shift workers experience higher incidences of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer.

The body's primary circadian clock, which regulates sleep and eating, is in the brain, but other body tissues also have circadian clocks, including the liver, which regulates blood glucose levels. 

In a new study in Diabetes online, University of Utah researchers show that dietary iron plays an important role in the circadian clock of the liver. Judith A. Simcox, Ph.D., a University of Utah postdoctoral fellow in biochemistry, is the study's lead author.


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Biological Clock: Graveyard Shift Workers Might Want To Skip High-Iron Foods

General - October 21, 2014 - 10:00pm

Disrupted circadian clocks are listed as a possible reason that shift workers experience higher incidences of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer.

The body's primary circadian clock, which regulates sleep and eating, is in the brain, but other body tissues also have circadian clocks, including the liver, which regulates blood glucose levels. 

In a new study in Diabetes online, University of Utah researchers show that dietary iron plays an important role in the circadian clock of the liver. Judith A. Simcox, Ph.D., a University of Utah postdoctoral fellow in biochemistry, is the study's lead author.


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Egg-Freezing: A Perk Too Far From Facebook And Apple?

General - October 21, 2014 - 9:30pm

Too much to ask. wavebreakmedia / shutterstock

By James Hayton, University of Warwick

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Egg-Freezing: A Perk Too Far From Facebook And Apple?

Science2.0 - October 21, 2014 - 9:30pm

Too much to ask. wavebreakmedia / shutterstock

By James Hayton, University of Warwick

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Cosmic Rays Jeopardize Deep-Space Astronaut Missions

General - October 21, 2014 - 9:30pm

No one is going into deep space any time soon, the modern political climate is such that it will now be common for one president to cancel his predecessor's program. As President Obama did to Bush, someone in 2017 is likely to do to President Obama.

Yet officially, the NASA that the president said could not even go back to the moon on time and on budget is hoping it will go to Mars, and in preparation for that people are trying to understand and characterize the radiation hazards astronauts could face., concludes a new paper by University of New Hampshire scientists.


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Cosmic Rays Jeopardize Deep-Space Astronaut Missions

Science2.0 - October 21, 2014 - 9:30pm

No one is going into deep space any time soon, the modern political climate is such that it will now be common for one president to cancel his predecessor's program. As President Obama did to Bush, someone in 2017 is likely to do to President Obama.

Yet officially, the NASA that the president said could not even go back to the moon on time and on budget is hoping it will go to Mars, and in preparation for that people are trying to understand and characterize the radiation hazards astronauts could face., concludes a new paper by University of New Hampshire scientists.


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Nutrigenomics: Put Your DNA On A Diet?

Science2.0 - October 21, 2014 - 9:01pm

Nutrigenomics is a branch of nutrition which believes the food we eat affects our genes - and the Food4Me project had gotten €9 million from the EU to put science to belief.

Proponents are looking at the usual factors, such as age, sex, BMI and physical activity, and trying to match that to the way in which an individual's genes interact with the food we eat. This would enable nutritionists to create a bespoke nutrition plan.

Research is on-going, but they believe there are indicators suggesting the technology could offer a vital tool in the fight against various lifestyle-linked diseases such as obesity, heart disease and Type II diabetes.


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Categories: Science2.0

Nutrigenomics: Put Your DNA On A Diet?

General - October 21, 2014 - 9:01pm

Nutrigenomics is a branch of nutrition which believes the food we eat affects our genes - and the Food4Me project had gotten €9 million from the EU to put science to belief.

Proponents are looking at the usual factors, such as age, sex, BMI and physical activity, and trying to match that to the way in which an individual's genes interact with the food we eat. This would enable nutritionists to create a bespoke nutrition plan.

Research is on-going, but they believe there are indicators suggesting the technology could offer a vital tool in the fight against various lifestyle-linked diseases such as obesity, heart disease and Type II diabetes.


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Categories: News