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Many Species Or One?

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 8:40pm

I’ve often wondered about the Scopes trial, and wanted to read a good account of it.  I was recommended the account by Edward J. Larson in When Science and Christianity Meet, edited by DC Lindberg and RL Numbers (ISBN 0226482162).  .  It’s a very informative book, and wide-ranging too: out of 12 chapters, only one on Galileo and one on Darwin.

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Many Species Or One?

General - July 25, 2014 - 8:40pm

I’ve often wondered about the Scopes trial, and wanted to read a good account of it.  I was recommended the account by Edward J. Larson in When Science and Christianity Meet, edited by DC Lindberg and RL Numbers (ISBN 0226482162).  .  It’s a very informative book, and wide-ranging too: out of 12 chapters, only one on Galileo and one on Darwin.

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Categories: News

US Nuclear Energy Is Safe - Will The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Listen?

General - July 25, 2014 - 6:51pm
A new National Academy of Sciences (NAS) assessment examining the causes of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident affirms the culture of safety adhered to by the U.S. nuclear industry.

Core findings from the NAS study, “Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving the Safety of U.S. Nuclear Plants,” validate the actions that the nuclear industry has initiated in recent years to be ready to manage plants if extreme natural events occur that may exceed a plant’s design basis.
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US Nuclear Energy Is Safe - Will The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Listen?

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 6:51pm
A new National Academy of Sciences (NAS) assessment examining the causes of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident affirms the culture of safety adhered to by the U.S. nuclear industry.

Core findings from the NAS study, “Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving the Safety of U.S. Nuclear Plants,” validate the actions that the nuclear industry has initiated in recent years to be ready to manage plants if extreme natural events occur that may exceed a plant’s design basis.
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Climate Change May Slow Down The Agriculture Boom

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 6:14pm

It's no secret that the last few decades have seen a whirlwind of improvements in agricultural science. Where the world once feared the future of Paul Ehrlich and John Holdren, with mass starvations and forced sterilization, we now have so much food the US government wants to mandate food stamps for farmer's markets, so poor people will have to consume fewer calories.

The food curve shows no signs of going anywhere but up, yet a new paper says climate change may impact the one the thing that hasn't been effected - in a few decades, anyway.


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Climate Change May Slow Down The Agriculture Boom

General - July 25, 2014 - 6:14pm

It's no secret that the last few decades have seen a whirlwind of improvements in agricultural science. Where the world once feared the future of Paul Ehrlich and John Holdren, with mass starvations and forced sterilization, we now have so much food the US government wants to mandate food stamps for farmer's markets, so poor people will have to consume fewer calories.

The food curve shows no signs of going anywhere but up, yet a new paper says climate change may impact the one the thing that hasn't been effected - in a few decades, anyway.


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Categories: News

Genetic Modification May Lead To Mildew Resistant Barley

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 5:00pm

In Australia, annual barley production is second only to wheat, with 7-8 million tons grown per year. Powdery mildew is one of the most important diseases of barley and a new project has opened the way for the development of new lines of barley with resistance to powdery mildew.

University of Adelaide
Senior Research Scientist Dr. Alan Little and colleagues have discovered the composition of special growths on the cell walls of barley plants that block the penetration of the fungus into the leaf.


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Genetic Modification May Lead To Mildew Resistant Barley

General - July 25, 2014 - 5:00pm

In Australia, annual barley production is second only to wheat, with 7-8 million tons grown per year. Powdery mildew is one of the most important diseases of barley and a new project has opened the way for the development of new lines of barley with resistance to powdery mildew.

University of Adelaide
Senior Research Scientist Dr. Alan Little and colleagues have discovered the composition of special growths on the cell walls of barley plants that block the penetration of the fungus into the leaf.


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Categories: News

Matmo: Taiwan's Typhoon Deluge

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 4:17pm

When Typhoon Matmo crossed over the island nation of Taiwan it left tremendous amounts of rainfall in its wake. 


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Matmo: Taiwan's Typhoon Deluge

General - July 25, 2014 - 4:17pm

When Typhoon Matmo crossed over the island nation of Taiwan it left tremendous amounts of rainfall in its wake. 


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Categories: News

100,000 Amps: New Magnets Boost Fusion Energy

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 4:01pm

Assembling yttrium-based high-temperature superconducting tapes in order to fabricate a large-scale magnet conductor has led to the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan  achieving an electrical current of 100,000 amperes, by far the highest in the world.


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100,000 Amps: New Magnets Boost Fusion Energy

General - July 25, 2014 - 4:01pm

Assembling yttrium-based high-temperature superconducting tapes in order to fabricate a large-scale magnet conductor has led to the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan  achieving an electrical current of 100,000 amperes, by far the highest in the world.


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Leftover Primordial Soup: The 4 Billion Year Old Chemistry Still In Our Cells Today

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 2:48pm

Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today, according to a new paper.

The articles in the Journal of Biological Chemistry
 discusses how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life – some four billion years ago.

The primordial soup theory suggests that life began in a pond or ocean as a result of the combination of metals, gases from the atmosphere and some form of energy, such as a lightning strike, to make the building blocks of proteins which would then evolve into all species.


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Leftover Primordial Soup: The 4 Billion Year Old Chemistry Still In Our Cells Today

General - July 25, 2014 - 2:48pm

Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today, according to a new paper.

The articles in the Journal of Biological Chemistry
 discusses how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life – some four billion years ago.

The primordial soup theory suggests that life began in a pond or ocean as a result of the combination of metals, gases from the atmosphere and some form of energy, such as a lightning strike, to make the building blocks of proteins which would then evolve into all species.


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Categories: News

Pheromones And Urine: Why It Takes Two To Court

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 2:36pm

Researchers have identified the functions of two classes of pheromone receptors, and found pheromones crucial to triggering the mating process in mice.


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Pheromones And Urine: Why It Takes Two To Court

General - July 25, 2014 - 2:36pm

Researchers have identified the functions of two classes of pheromone receptors, and found pheromones crucial to triggering the mating process in mice.


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Categories: News

Hyperphosphatemia: Ferric Citrate Long-term Phase 3 Study Results Published

General - July 25, 2014 - 2:01pm

New York, NY - July 24, 2014 -- Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. has published results from the long-term, randomized, active control Phase 3 study of Zerenex (ferric citrate), their investigational oral ferric iron-based phosphate binder for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis. The PERFECTED study (PhosphatE binding and iRon delivery with FErric CiTrate in EsrD) was published online today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN).


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Categories: News

Hyperphosphatemia: Ferric Citrate Long-term Phase 3 Study Results Published

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 2:01pm

New York, NY - July 24, 2014 -- Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. has published results from the long-term, randomized, active control Phase 3 study of Zerenex (ferric citrate), their investigational oral ferric iron-based phosphate binder for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis. The PERFECTED study (PhosphatE binding and iRon delivery with FErric CiTrate in EsrD) was published online today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN).


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Categories: Science2.0

Why Do Women Prefer Bad Boys And Men Prefer Nice Women?

General - July 25, 2014 - 1:59pm

Why do women prefer bad boys? Why do men prefer nice women? Why do social psychologists love to conduct surveys about sweeping stereotypes and call it science?

These are complex questions without simple answers. Responsiveness may be one of those initial "sparks" necessary to fuel sexual desire and land a second date - the same thing in many flavors of psychology - but it may not be a desirable trait for both men and women on a first date, according to a new paper in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin which wants to discuss if responsiveness increases sexual desire in the other person. Do men perceive responsive women as more attractive, and does the same hold true for women's perceptions of men?    


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Categories: News

Why Do Women Prefer Bad Boys And Men Prefer Nice Women?

Science2.0 - July 25, 2014 - 1:59pm

Why do women prefer bad boys? Why do men prefer nice women? Why do social psychologists love to conduct surveys about sweeping stereotypes and call it science?

These are complex questions without simple answers. Responsiveness may be one of those initial "sparks" necessary to fuel sexual desire and land a second date - the same thing in many flavors of psychology - but it may not be a desirable trait for both men and women on a first date, according to a new paper in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin which wants to discuss if responsiveness increases sexual desire in the other person. Do men perceive responsive women as more attractive, and does the same hold true for women's perceptions of men?    


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Categories: Science2.0