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Promising cell study provides hope of effective treatment of Parkinson's disease

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
There is a significant decrease in the level of calcium when nerve cells are affected by Parkinson's disease. If the calcium level is kept stable, severe symptoms in Parkinson's patients may be prevented. This is shown by a recent laboratory study from Aarhus University.
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Translating elephant seal data into a symphony provides surprising insights

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Sonification of 10 years of oceanic migration of these seals reveals coordinated swimming.
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Odd one out: Protein goes against the family to prevent cancer donate

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Melbourne researchers have made the surprise discovery that the 'odd one out' in a family of proteins known to drive cancer development is instead critical for preventing stomach cancers.The research team showed switching off a gene called NF-κB1 caused spontaneous development of stomach cancers, driven by chronic inflammation. The study also revealed that immunotherapy may prove to be a significant tool for treating stomach cancers that are driven by runaway inflammation, warranting further investigation.
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Animal cyborg: Behavioral control by 'toy' craving circuit

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Children love to get toys from parents for their birthday present. This craving toward items also involves object hoarding disorders and shopping addiction. However, the biological meaning of why the brain pursues objects or items has remained unknown. Part of the answer may lie with a neural circuit in the hypothalamus associated with 'object craving,' says neuroscientist Daesoo Kim from the Department of Biological Sciences at KAIST.
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New research modernizes rammed earth construction

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
A building method as old as dirt is being re-examined as a 'new' and viable modern construction material.Compressed soil, also known as rammed earth, is a method of construction that dates back centuries. UBC Okanagan engineering professor Sumi Siddiqua, who has been researching the resurgence in rammed earth, says conventional cement is still the go-to for modern engineers.
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Complete skin regeneration system of fish unraveled

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have succeeded in observing the behavior of epidermal cells for the regeneration of smooth skin without remaining scar tissue using their model animal, the zebrafish.
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Why freeloader baby-eating ants are welcomed to the colony

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
It might seem surprising that a colony of ants would tolerate the type of guests that gobble both their grub and their babies. But new research shows there's likely a useful tradeoff to calmly accepting these parasite ants into the fold: They have weaponry that's effective against their host ants and a more menacing intruder ant.
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Let it go: Mental breaks after work improve sleep

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
If you've had a bad day at work thanks to rude colleagues, doing something fun and relaxing after you punch out could net you a better night's sleep.
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IBS patients obtain robust, enduring relief from home-based treatment program

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
In the largest federally funded non-drug clinical trial for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), patients with the most severe and persistent symptoms achieved robust and sustained relief by learning to control symptoms with minimal clinician contact. Led by University at Buffalo researchers in collaboration with colleagues at New York University and Northwestern University, the study was published online before print in Gastroenterology.
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How your brain learns to expect mud puddles in the park (and other things)

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Whenever there's a mismatch between what you expect to experience and what you actually experience, the brain has to register the error and update your expectation. These changing expectations are fundamental for making decisions. A new study is the first to show how your midbrain responds to the error, and the orbitofrontal cortex updates the information. That's how you know what to expect tomorrow.
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Hacking human 'drug trafficking' network could make diabetes treatments more effective

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Making tiny changes to existing diabetes treatments can alter how they interact with cells, and potentially make the medicines more effective.
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Antibiotic resistance can be caused by small amounts of antibiotics

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a global and growing problem in health care. To be able to prevent further development of resistance developing, it is important to understand where and how antibiotic resistance in bacteria arises. New research from Uppsala University shows that low concentrations of antibiotics, too, can cause high antibiotic resistance to develop in bacteria.
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Asthma and hay fever linked to increased risk of psychiatric disorders

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
A new study is the first to find a significant link between asthma, hay fever and a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Over 15 years, 10.8 percent of patients with allergic diseases developed a psychiatric disorder, compared to only 6.7 percent of those without allergies. Monitoring the mental health of patients with allergies could help doctors care for their patients more effectively.
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First genetic evidence of ongoing mating between 2 distinct species of guenon monkeys

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
A new study of guenon monkeys in Gombe National Park is the first to provide genetic evidence of ongoing mating between two distinct species. These monkeys have successfully been producing hybrid offspring for hundreds maybe even thousands of years. Prior studies have suggested that the different physical characteristics of these monkeys keeps them from interbreeding. So, if their faces don't match, they shouldn't be mating, right? Wrong, according to this latest evidence.
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New UTSA study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted driving

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
A new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. Jadliwala and his collaborators discovered that while a driver texting with a wearable device can marginally reduce their level of distraction, it ultimately makes texting while driving just as dangerous as with an ordinary cell phone.
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Audit finds biodiversity data aggregators 'lose and confuse' data

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Both online repositories the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) were found to 'lose and confuse' portions of the data provided to them, according to an independent audit of ca. 800,000 records from three Australasian museums. Genus and species names were found to have been changed in up to 1 in 5 records, and programming errors caused up to 100 percent data loss in some data categories.
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Young athletes interested in healthy protein, not French fries

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
The greasy food being served at hockey rinks isn't really what young hockey players want, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
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Trees with grassy areas soften summer heat

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Trees cool their environment and 'heat islands' like Munich benefit from it. However, the degree of cooling depends greatly on the tree species and the local conditions. In a recent study, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) compared two species of urban trees.
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Eating more fish could prevent Parkinson's disease

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
Parvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease. A new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health.
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Nanomedicine: Drugs can be made 'smarter'

Eurekalert - 21 hours 6 min ago
A new method has been developed to make drugs 'smarter' using nanotechnology so pharmacologists can tailor their drugs to more accurately target an area on the body, such as a cancer tumour.
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