news aggregator

Anyone Can Get a Blood Clot

ACSH - May 8, 2017 - 8:30pm

Our innate coagulation – or clotting – cascade is quite a dynamic, but formidable system. When optimally effective, it manages retention of a balanced condition between not too much bleeding and not too much clotting. Let's take a look at how to reduce your chances of developing pathologic clots.

Categories: ACSH

Altering Runners' Glucose Levels, to Avoid 'Hitting the Wall'

ACSH - May 8, 2017 - 7:07pm

Glucose and fat are essential to powering muscles. But glucose is the only energy source that fuels the brain and sustains motivation. Scientists believe that if glucose depletion could be reduced, "hitting the wall" – or for marathoners, giving up – could theoretically be delayed. A recent study examined this glucose-brain connection.

Categories: ACSH

What Does 'Defunding' Planned Parenthood Really Mean

ACSH - May 8, 2017 - 7:00pm

When the House of Representatives says it will "defund" Planned Parenthood, it sounds simple. But it's not – because lawmakers will have to enact new rules about who gets paid via Title X and Medicaid. That would mean that many women (and some men, too) wouldn't have access to a wide variety of both contraceptive, and general, health care.

Categories: ACSH

Are Your Data Fluctuating As They Should ?

Science2.0 - May 8, 2017 - 1:25pm
A little while ago I encountered an interesting problem, which I had fun solving by myself. I think my solution is not original (it must have occurred to others a gazillion times in the past) but I do believe the implementation is nice, so I want to share it with you here.
The general problem

Imagine you are given a set of counts distributed in bins of a histogram. This could be, for instance, the age distribution of a set of people. You are asked to assign uncertainty bars to the counts: in other words, estimate a "one-sigma" interval for the relative rate of counts in each bin.
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Categories: Science2.0

Are Your Data Fluctuating As They Should ?

General - May 8, 2017 - 1:25pm
A little while ago I encountered an interesting problem, which I had fun solving by myself. I think my solution is not original (it must have occurred to others a gazillion times in the past) but I do believe the implementation is nice, so I want to share it with you here.
The general problem

Imagine you are given a set of counts distributed in bins of a histogram. This could be, for instance, the age distribution of a set of people. You are asked to assign uncertainty bars to the counts: in other words, estimate a "one-sigma" interval for the relative rate of counts in each bin.
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read more

Categories: News

New Model Predicts Which Mentally Ill Patients Are Unlikely to Be Violent

ACSH - May 6, 2017 - 1:10am

Mental illness still carries a stigma in society, particularly for those who suffer from a severe form, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. High-profile incidents, in which a mentally ill person commits a violent crime, has led to the stereotype that the mentally ill pose a dire threat to society.

Categories: ACSH

'Science' Finally Retracts An Absolute Mess Of A Paper

ACSH - May 5, 2017 - 4:20pm

A high-profile paper has finally been retracted by the journal Science after 10 months of investigation. The work has been ruled to be so full of negligence by an ethical review board – which discovered missing data and flat-out lies – it's a wonder how it was ever accepted in the first place. 

Categories: ACSH

Herpes Vaccine From Down Under: Not Much Excitement For Admedus

ACSH - May 5, 2017 - 2:53pm

For those of you who are following herpes vaccines in development, the news out of Australia isn't bad. Or especially good. Admedus just released Phase IIa clinical trial results of its herpes simplex 2 vaccine. Even the company didn't seem all that enthusiastic (which is, in a way, OK.)

Categories: ACSH

Herpes Vaccine From Down Under: Not Much Excitement

ACSH - May 5, 2017 - 2:53pm

Admedus, and Australian biotech company is one of the companies and institutions that is in the herpes vaccine race. The company just released Phase IIa clinical trial results of its herpes simplex 2 vaccine. There doesn't seem to be anything to get excited about. 

Categories: ACSH

Are Microbiologists Climate-Denying Science Haters?

ACSH - May 4, 2017 - 11:27pm

Recently, I gave a seminar on "fake news" to professors and grad students at a large public university. Early in my talk, I polled the audience: "How many of you believe climate change is the world's #1 threat?"

Silence. Not a single person raised his or her hand.

Was I speaking in front of a group of science deniers? The College Republicans? Some fringe libertarian club? No, it was a room full of microbiologists.

Categories: ACSH

Explaining Motion Sickness, and How to Manage it

ACSH - May 4, 2017 - 7:28pm

Astronauts get it in space, as do passengers when riding in trains and cars. And some of the latest gaming technology has created new entrants to Club Queasy: virtual reality enthusiasts. So while motion sickness is a very common condition, it doesn't have a definitive cure. But here's how you can manage it when it strikes.

Categories: ACSH

Well Done, Ed Sheeran! Keep that Spotlight on Rare Disease

ACSH - May 4, 2017 - 5:55pm

And, the award for promoting public health and being a patient advocate goes to... Ed Sheeran!

Categories: ACSH

Why Do Women Die At Higher Rates After Being Discharged With Heart Arrhythmias?

Science2.0 - May 4, 2017 - 5:30pm
Atrial fibrillation and flutter (also known as AFF) is associated with serious health problems and is a significant contributor to death rates. Knowing that, why would there be different death rates for male and female patients who presented with AFF to emergency departments and then discharged? Even 30 and 90 days after discharge. 

AFF is an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that is associated with blood clots to the brain (e.g., stroke) and other organs, heart failure, and sometimes death. It affects approximately 2.66 million Americans. 
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Categories: Science2.0

Why Do Women Die At Higher Rates After Being Discharged With Heart Arrhythmias?

General - May 4, 2017 - 5:30pm
Atrial fibrillation and flutter (also known as AFF) is associated with serious health problems and is a significant contributor to death rates. Knowing that, why would there be different death rates for male and female patients who presented with AFF to emergency departments and then discharged? Even 30 and 90 days after discharge. 

AFF is an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that is associated with blood clots to the brain (e.g., stroke) and other organs, heart failure, and sometimes death. It affects approximately 2.66 million Americans. 
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Categories: News

Dear US News & World Report, Essential Oils Don't Cause Weight Loss

ACSH - May 4, 2017 - 4:05pm

US News & World Report: What were you thinking running this advertorial for nonsense?

Categories: ACSH

Dear America, Contraception Works

ACSH - May 4, 2017 - 2:15pm

We didn't think that questioning the efficacy of contraception was still a thing. So we took a look at the data, just to be sure. And as we suspected, the facts show that the most-widely used forms of birth control don't just work, but when used properly they are incredibly effective.

Categories: ACSH

Algorithms In Medicine

ACSH - May 4, 2017 - 7:35am

Medicine has used algorithms and machines to make diagnostic statements for many years. But are we prepared for algorithms we don't understand?

Categories: ACSH

No, Stephen Hawking, We Won't Have to Abandon Earth in 100 Years

ACSH - May 4, 2017 - 5:51am

There's no doubt that Stephen Hawking is one of the most brilliant scientists to have ever lived. There's also no doubt that he enjoys giving his opinion on topics of which he knows absolutely nothing.

Categories: ACSH

Separate Evolution: Men, Women, And Gene Expression

Science2.0 - May 3, 2017 - 9:04pm
Though men and women obviously differ, that has become muddled in the name of equality. Drug reactions are different, obviously one gender gives birth to children. 

A new study shows there are still many similarities, but also a whole lot of biological differences not in genes, but in gene expression. Their findings showed that harmful mutations in these particular genes tend to accumulate in the population in relatively high frequencies, and the study explains why. The detailed map of these genes provides evidence that males and females undergo a sort of separate, but interconnected, evolution.  
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Categories: Science2.0

Separate Evolution: Men, Women, And Gene Expression

General - May 3, 2017 - 9:04pm
Though men and women obviously differ, that has become muddled in the name of equality. Drug reactions are different, obviously one gender gives birth to children. 

A new study shows there are still many similarities, but also a whole lot of biological differences not in genes, but in gene expression. Their findings showed that harmful mutations in these particular genes tend to accumulate in the population in relatively high frequencies, and the study explains why. The detailed map of these genes provides evidence that males and females undergo a sort of separate, but interconnected, evolution.  
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read more

Categories: News