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Can Marijuana Ease NFL Players’ Pain? Claims Are All Over The Field

ACSH - February 5, 2016 - 5:14pm

The rise of medical marijuana has kicked off a host of medical claims. A recurring one from some ex-NFL players is that pot greatly helps manage pain, and that it can be an effective substitute for opioid narcotics while helping guard against possible addiction. But while there may be benefits, these claims aren't medically proven, as a range of results from different studies show. Continue reading →

The post Can Marijuana Ease NFL Players’ Pain? Claims Are All Over The Field appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

Categories: ACSH

First-semester GPA A Better Predictor Of College Success Than ACT Score

Science2.0 - February 5, 2016 - 1:19pm

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Underrepresented students' first-semester GPA may be a better predictor of whether they'll graduate college than their ACT score or their family's socioeconomic status, a new study found.

Researchers at the University of Illinois tracked the academic achievement and degree status of more than 1,900 U. of I. freshmen across a six-year period, beginning when the students first enrolled at the university in 2005 or 2006. The sample was selected to focus on students who were low-income, attended underresourced high schools and/or were historically underrepresented based on race or geography, and who could have completed an undergraduate program within six years.


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Categories: Science2.0

First-semester GPA A Better Predictor Of College Success Than ACT Score

General - February 5, 2016 - 1:19pm

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Underrepresented students' first-semester GPA may be a better predictor of whether they'll graduate college than their ACT score or their family's socioeconomic status, a new study found.

Researchers at the University of Illinois tracked the academic achievement and degree status of more than 1,900 U. of I. freshmen across a six-year period, beginning when the students first enrolled at the university in 2005 or 2006. The sample was selected to focus on students who were low-income, attended underresourced high schools and/or were historically underrepresented based on race or geography, and who could have completed an undergraduate program within six years.


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Categories: News

Molecular Switch Lets Salmonella Fight Or Evade Immune System

Science2.0 - February 5, 2016 - 1:17pm

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a molecular regulator that allows salmonella bacteria to switch from actively causing disease to lurking in a chronic but asymptomatic state called a biofilm.

Their findings are published in the online journal, eLife.


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Categories: Science2.0

Molecular Switch Lets Salmonella Fight Or Evade Immune System

General - February 5, 2016 - 1:17pm

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a molecular regulator that allows salmonella bacteria to switch from actively causing disease to lurking in a chronic but asymptomatic state called a biofilm.

Their findings are published in the online journal, eLife.


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Categories: News

Secondhand Smoke: Nations Producing Less Greenhouse Gas Most Vulnerable To Climate Change

Science2.0 - February 5, 2016 - 1:17pm

  • Conversely, nations that produce most greenhouse gases less vulnerable

  • Study shows "enormous global inequality" between emitters versus impacted nations
  • Countries like U.S., Canada, Russia, and China are climate "free riders," which dis-incentivizes mitigating their emissions
  • Problem will worsen in coming decades

    NEW YORK (EMBARGOED UNTIL FRIDAY, FEBRUAY 5TH 5:00 A.M. USET) - A new study by University of Queensland and WCS shows a dramatic global mismatch between nations producing the most greenhouse gases and the ones most vulnerable to the effects of climate change.


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    Categories: Science2.0

    Secondhand Smoke: Nations Producing Less Greenhouse Gas Most Vulnerable To Climate Change

    General - February 5, 2016 - 1:17pm

    • Conversely, nations that produce most greenhouse gases less vulnerable

  • Study shows "enormous global inequality" between emitters versus impacted nations
  • Countries like U.S., Canada, Russia, and China are climate "free riders," which dis-incentivizes mitigating their emissions
  • Problem will worsen in coming decades

    NEW YORK (EMBARGOED UNTIL FRIDAY, FEBRUAY 5TH 5:00 A.M. USET) - A new study by University of Queensland and WCS shows a dramatic global mismatch between nations producing the most greenhouse gases and the ones most vulnerable to the effects of climate change.


  • read more

    Categories: News

    Mid-Life Crisis Clusters Found In 4 US Cities

    ACSH - February 5, 2016 - 12:25pm

    Considering hair plugs? Craving a convertible? According to the research from a real estate website, where a middle-aged man lives could play a huge role in how he specifically perceives, adopts and manages a midlife crisis. Continue reading →

    The post Mid-Life Crisis Clusters Found In 4 US Cities appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

    Categories: ACSH

    Wiki Woes: Websites For Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Are Inaccurate And Outdated

    Science2.0 - February 5, 2016 - 12:00pm

    After evaluating content on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis on almost 200 websites, researchers found that the information on Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
    (IPF) from these sites was often incomplete, inaccurate and outdated. 


    -->

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    Categories: Science2.0

    Wiki Woes: Websites For Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Are Inaccurate And Outdated

    General - February 5, 2016 - 12:00pm

    After evaluating content on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis on almost 200 websites, researchers found that the information on Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
    (IPF) from these sites was often incomplete, inaccurate and outdated. 


    -->

    read more

    Categories: News

    Why Rest Is Critical After A Concussion

    Science2.0 - February 5, 2016 - 11:45am

    Doctors recommend several days of rest after a person suffers a concussion, but that is often good advice for many things. It works, but why? New data from animal models explains why.  

    Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists say rest allows the brain to reset neural networks and repair any short-term injury. The new study in mice also shows that repeated mild concussions with only a day to recover between injuries leads to mounting damage and brain inflammation that remains evident a year after injury.


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    Categories: Science2.0

    Why Rest Is Critical After A Concussion

    General - February 5, 2016 - 11:45am

    Doctors recommend several days of rest after a person suffers a concussion, but that is often good advice for many things. It works, but why? New data from animal models explains why.  

    Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists say rest allows the brain to reset neural networks and repair any short-term injury. The new study in mice also shows that repeated mild concussions with only a day to recover between injuries leads to mounting damage and brain inflammation that remains evident a year after injury.


    read more

    Categories: News

    Hair Thinning By Stem Cell Loss

    Science2.0 - February 5, 2016 - 1:49am

    Why people lose their locks in old age may be related to the aging of hair follicle stem cells, two new studies suggest. Though it is known that mammals that live for longer lifespans lose their hair, the mechanisms underlying this fate have been a mystery. Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs), which generate the sacs or follicles that produce hair, keep hair growth going repeatedly over time. Surprisingly, they have even been shown, in mice experiments, to resist aging. To better understand the role HFSCs might play in aging-associated hair loss, Hiroyuki Matsumura and colleagues studied hair follicles in a mouse model of accelerated hair loss.


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    Categories: Science2.0

    Hair Thinning By Stem Cell Loss

    General - February 5, 2016 - 1:49am

    Why people lose their locks in old age may be related to the aging of hair follicle stem cells, two new studies suggest. Though it is known that mammals that live for longer lifespans lose their hair, the mechanisms underlying this fate have been a mystery. Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs), which generate the sacs or follicles that produce hair, keep hair growth going repeatedly over time. Surprisingly, they have even been shown, in mice experiments, to resist aging. To better understand the role HFSCs might play in aging-associated hair loss, Hiroyuki Matsumura and colleagues studied hair follicles in a mouse model of accelerated hair loss.


    read more

    Categories: News

    Mites Drive Deformed Wing Virus In Honeybees

    Science2.0 - February 5, 2016 - 1:49am

    A new analysis of one of the most widespread honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus, or DWV, shows that the virus has gone from an endemic to a global epidemic because of greater movement of a major vector, the Varroa mite. The mite has spread in large part due to human trade of the bee colonies it infests. The study contributes greatly to scientists' understanding of the globally pressing issue of pollinator health by describing the worldwide transmission routes and dynamics of DWV based on analysis of a new and large molecular data set. Previous evidence indicates that the presence of the mite Varroa increases the spread of DWV across honeybee populations, not only by acting as a vector but also by increasing the virulence of the virus.


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    Categories: Science2.0

    Mites Drive Deformed Wing Virus In Honeybees

    General - February 5, 2016 - 1:49am

    A new analysis of one of the most widespread honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus, or DWV, shows that the virus has gone from an endemic to a global epidemic because of greater movement of a major vector, the Varroa mite. The mite has spread in large part due to human trade of the bee colonies it infests. The study contributes greatly to scientists' understanding of the globally pressing issue of pollinator health by describing the worldwide transmission routes and dynamics of DWV based on analysis of a new and large molecular data set. Previous evidence indicates that the presence of the mite Varroa increases the spread of DWV across honeybee populations, not only by acting as a vector but also by increasing the virulence of the virus.


    read more

    Categories: News

    Emerging Vascular Risk Factors In Women: Any Differences From Men?

    Science2.0 - February 4, 2016 - 10:17pm

    The incidence and severity of both traditional and emerging cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors as well as the response to treatment may differ between genders. In this narrative review, several emerging CVD risk factors (i.e. inflammatory and haemostatic markers, endothelial dysfunction, homocysteine, lipid disorders, microalbuminuria/proteinuria, coronary artery calcium score, arterial stiffness, periodontitis, inflammatory bowel syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, impaired glucose metabolism, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) are discussed in the context of gender differences.


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    Categories: Science2.0

    Emerging Vascular Risk Factors In Women: Any Differences From Men?

    General - February 4, 2016 - 10:17pm

    The incidence and severity of both traditional and emerging cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors as well as the response to treatment may differ between genders. In this narrative review, several emerging CVD risk factors (i.e. inflammatory and haemostatic markers, endothelial dysfunction, homocysteine, lipid disorders, microalbuminuria/proteinuria, coronary artery calcium score, arterial stiffness, periodontitis, inflammatory bowel syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, impaired glucose metabolism, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) are discussed in the context of gender differences.


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    Categories: News

    Scientists Find Brain Plasticity Assorted Into Functional Networks

    Science2.0 - February 4, 2016 - 10:17pm

    The brain still has a lot to learn about itself. Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have made a key finding of the striking differences in how the brain's cells can change through experience.

    Their results were published this week in PLOS ONE.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Scientists Find Brain Plasticity Assorted Into Functional Networks

    General - February 4, 2016 - 10:17pm

    The brain still has a lot to learn about itself. Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have made a key finding of the striking differences in how the brain's cells can change through experience.

    Their results were published this week in PLOS ONE.


    read more

    Categories: News