news aggregator

Culture Matters In Medicine Acceptance And Public Health

Science2.0 - October 29, 2014 - 2:56pm

It's great to insist that people should just accept science and medicine but it isn't really practical. The nature of coastal California is that they don't trust vaccines the way religious people in the American south do, Asians are going to believe in acupucture, and the French will think they can be allergic to Bt genetically modified plants but not Bt organic pesticide spray.

Historically, culture has been considered an impediment to health rather than a central determining feature of it. However, a new paper in


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Confucius Doesn't Live Here Anymore

General - October 29, 2014 - 2:55pm

Confucius stands guard at Beijing's Renmin University. George (Sam) Crane, Author provided

By Sam (George T.) Crane, Williams College

-->

read more

Categories: News

Confucius Doesn't Live Here Anymore

Science2.0 - October 29, 2014 - 2:55pm

Confucius stands guard at Beijing's Renmin University. George (Sam) Crane, Author provided

By Sam (George T.) Crane, Williams College

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Stop Looking for Aliens

RealClearScience - October 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

Why Einstein Was Spooked

RealClearScience - October 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

4 Factors Make Good Coffee

RealClearScience - October 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

Math Behind 'Shoe Size' Trick

RealClearScience - October 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

Mandatory Ebola Quarantine Is About Politics, Not Public Health

Science2.0 - October 29, 2014 - 4:26am

The risk to the Australian community from doctors and nurses returning from Ebola-affected countries is minimal. Credit: EPA/ARIE KIEVIT

By Grant Hill-Cawthorne, University of Sydney and Adam Kamradt-Scott, University of Sydney

Governments have a duty to protect their citizens but the plan to impose mandatory detention on health-care workers being suggested by some Australian states is excessive and unwarranted.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Mandatory Ebola Quarantine Is About Politics, Not Public Health

General - October 29, 2014 - 4:26am

The risk to the Australian community from doctors and nurses returning from Ebola-affected countries is minimal. Credit: EPA/ARIE KIEVIT

By Grant Hill-Cawthorne, University of Sydney and Adam Kamradt-Scott, University of Sydney

Governments have a duty to protect their citizens but the plan to impose mandatory detention on health-care workers being suggested by some Australian states is excessive and unwarranted.

-->

read more

Categories: News

People Without Symptoms Aren't Going To Give You Ebola - Here Is Why

General - October 28, 2014 - 10:31pm

Flying by Shutterstock

By Stephen Goldstein, University of Pennsylvania

-->

read more

Categories: News

People Without Symptoms Aren't Going To Give You Ebola - Here Is Why

Science2.0 - October 28, 2014 - 10:31pm

Flying by Shutterstock

By Stephen Goldstein, University of Pennsylvania

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Politics Is Quacked: How To Win Friends And Influence Ducklings

Science2.0 - October 28, 2014 - 9:40pm

Courtesy of Guiomar Liste

By: Nala Rogers, Inside Science

(Inside Science) -- When ducklings head out to bathe in a pool, they usually follow the same individual, new research has found. But do they visit the pool that’s best for everyone, or just the one their chief prefers? This puzzle has made it hard for farmers to know how to provide for all their ducks equally, and for biologists to know what social animals really want.  

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Politics Is Quacked: How To Win Friends And Influence Ducklings

General - October 28, 2014 - 9:40pm

Courtesy of Guiomar Liste

By: Nala Rogers, Inside Science

(Inside Science) -- When ducklings head out to bathe in a pool, they usually follow the same individual, new research has found. But do they visit the pool that’s best for everyone, or just the one their chief prefers? This puzzle has made it hard for farmers to know how to provide for all their ducks equally, and for biologists to know what social animals really want.  

-->

read more

Categories: News

Everyone Hates Daylight Savings Time - But It Might Improve Public Health

Science2.0 - October 28, 2014 - 8:38pm

It's not easy to blame childhood obesity on sunsets but scholars at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Bristol say that later daylight couldn't hurt - and they even defend daylight savings time, which most people can't find much good to say about.

The scholars analyzed the lifestyles of over 23,000 children aged 5-16 years in nine countries; England, Australia, USA, Norway, Denmark, Estonia, Switzerland, Brazil and Madeira and Portugal. They looked for associations between the time of sunset and physical activity levels, measured via waist-worn accelerometers; electronic devices that measure body movement.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Everyone Hates Daylight Savings Time - But It Might Improve Public Health

General - October 28, 2014 - 8:38pm

It's not easy to blame childhood obesity on sunsets but scholars at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Bristol say that later daylight couldn't hurt - and they even defend daylight savings time, which most people can't find much good to say about.

The scholars analyzed the lifestyles of over 23,000 children aged 5-16 years in nine countries; England, Australia, USA, Norway, Denmark, Estonia, Switzerland, Brazil and Madeira and Portugal. They looked for associations between the time of sunset and physical activity levels, measured via waist-worn accelerometers; electronic devices that measure body movement.


read more

Categories: News

Does Flopping Work In Basketball?

Science2.0 - October 28, 2014 - 8:21pm

In the United States, professional basketball, the NBA, opens its regular season tonight. That means at this time tomorrow there will be talk that some player 'flopped' - fell on the ground to draw a foul and get a chance at a free basket.

A new analysis has found that two-thirds of the falls examined by the group at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev were found to be intentional.  And it happens a lot.

It happens so much because there is insufficient punishment for deception and teams are not doing the math. A cost/benefit analysis of "flopping" finds that 90 percent of the time no penalty is awarded, so as a strategy it is pointless.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Does Flopping Work In Basketball?

General - October 28, 2014 - 8:21pm

In the United States, professional basketball, the NBA, opens its regular season tonight. That means at this time tomorrow there will be talk that some player 'flopped' - fell on the ground to draw a foul and get a chance at a free basket.

A new analysis has found that two-thirds of the falls examined by the group at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev were found to be intentional.  And it happens a lot.

It happens so much because there is insufficient punishment for deception and teams are not doing the math. A cost/benefit analysis of "flopping" finds that 90 percent of the time no penalty is awarded, so as a strategy it is pointless.


read more

Categories: News

We Can Restore Cognition By Manipulating Where The Body Meets The Mind

Science2.0 - October 28, 2014 - 7:57pm

Targeting cognition through the body. Cognition by Shutterstock

By Michal Schwartz, Weizmann Institute of Science; Aleksandra Deczkowska, Weizmann Institute of Science, and Kuti Baruch, Weizmann Institute of Science

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

We Can Restore Cognition By Manipulating Where The Body Meets The Mind

General - October 28, 2014 - 7:57pm

Targeting cognition through the body. Cognition by Shutterstock

By Michal Schwartz, Weizmann Institute of Science; Aleksandra Deczkowska, Weizmann Institute of Science, and Kuti Baruch, Weizmann Institute of Science

-->

read more

Categories: News

Reduce Prostate Cancer Risk By Sleeping With Lots Of Women - But Not Men

Science2.0 - October 28, 2014 - 7:26pm

Men who have had sex with more than 20 women have a 28% lower risk of getting prostate cancer than those who have had only one partner  - but males having more than 20 male partners face a 100% higher risk of getting prostate cancer than those who have never slept with a man. 

The results were obtained as part of the Montreal study PROtEuS (Prostate Cancer&Environment Study), in which 3,208 men responded to a questionnaire on, amongst other things, their sex lives. Of these men, 1,590 were diagnosed with prostate cancer between September 2005 and August 2009, while 1,618 men were part of the control group.

Risk Associated with Number of Partners


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0