Feed aggregator

'You still end up with nothing': Reality of living in work poverty revealed

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
As the number of working families who live in poverty continues to rise in the UK, a new 'On the front line' article reveals the severe challenges that low pay, limited working hours and constrained employment opportunities bring.
Categories: Content

Live fast die young: Updating signal detection theory

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
Signal Detection Theory holds that in a predator-prey relationship, prey animals will show more wariness and be more prone to flee as predators become more common. New work from UC Davis shows that in a more realistic model, animals may become less wary as the risks of predation increase. The work has implications in a wide range of fields.
Categories: Content

Keeping active can help older people reduce the need for costly social care

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
A concerted effort to encourage older people to keep active can help them live more independently and reduce the need for social care, argue experts in The BMJ today.
Categories: Content

New anti-clotting drugs not associated with higher risk of major bleeding

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
A new group of drugs used to treat patients with serious blood clots are not associated with a higher risk of major bleeding compared with the older anti-clotting drug, warfarin, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
Categories: Content

Culturally tailored obesity intervention a success for hispanic students

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
An obesity intervention for Hispanic middle school students led by researchers at the University of Houston found that with consistent guidance from high school health mentors, called compañeros, students not only lost significantly more weight but also kept it off longer.
Categories: Content

Bridging the terahertz gap

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
Harvard researchers are exploring the possibility of using an infrared frequency comb to generate elusive terahertz frequencies. These frequencies -- which lie in the electromagnetic spectrum between radio waves and infrared light -- have long promised to transform communications and sensing but are very challenging to source. By harnessing a recently discovered laser state, SEAS researchers have discovered an infrared frequency comb in a quantum cascade laser that offers a new way to generate terahertz frequencies.
Categories: Content

Fighting opioid addiction in primary care: new study shows it's possible

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
General physicians can deliver medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction with help from the team members they likely already have in their practices, a new analysis concludes.
Categories: Content

Colliding neutron stars seen by gravity waves and optical telescopes

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
For the first time, astronomers have observed a celestial event through both conventional telescopes and gravitational waves. The collision of two super-dense neutron stars just 120 million light-years from Earth was captured by both gravity wave observatories (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory, LIGO in the US, and Virgo in Italy) and telescopes including the DLT40 survey based in Chile.
Categories: Content

Researchers show the potential of precision medicine for treating rare cancers

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
For the first time, researchers have been able to identify effective treatments for patients with rare cancers by analyzing genes and proteins in their blood and tumors.
Categories: Content

'Wasabi receptor' for pain discovered in flatworms

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
A Northwestern University research team has discovered how scalding heat and tissue injury activate an ancient 'pain' receptor in simple animals. The findings, from a study of flatworms, could lead to new strategies for analgesic drug design for the treatment of humans. That planarian flatworms use the same molecular receptor as flies, mice and humans to detect potentially damaging or noxious stimuli from the environment shows a remarkable level of evolutionary conservation, the researchers say.
Categories: Content

Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-rays

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
Imagine Google Earth with only the street view and a far-away satellite view but not much of a map view. Brain imaging, for the most part, has been missing just that, and a lot of research on how the brain computes happens on that map-like level. New imaging tackles this special view of the brain with the highest-energy X-rays in the country that illuminate thick sections of a mouse brain.
Categories: Content

Many women do not follow contraception guidelines after weight-loss surgery, Pitt study finds

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
Many women do not follow the recommended guidelines to avoid contraception for 18-months after bariatric surgery.
Categories: Content

How bright is the moon, really?

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is planning to take new measurements of the Moon's brightness, a highly useful property that satellites rely upon every day.
Categories: Content

Study links chocolate production to increased deforestation in poor nations

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
In newly published research, Mark Noble, visiting assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at Lehigh, focuses on the link between cocoa exports and deforestation in developing nations.
Categories: Content

Fighting fires before they spark

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
With warm, dry summers comes a deadly caveat for the western United States: wildfires. Scientists say the hot, dry climates found west of the Mississippi, along with decades of fire suppression efforts, are creating a devastating and destructive combination -- leading to fires like the ones currently burning in California. Now, new research from The University of New Mexico is giving forest and fire management teams across the country the upper hand in reducing the severity of these events.
Categories: Content

Therapeutic form of arsenic is a potential treatment for deadly type of brain cancer

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
In a study led by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), this anti-cancer agent is being considered for use against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive type of deadly brain tumors. The study was published today in Molecular Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).
Categories: Content

New examination of occupational licensing contradicts decades of research

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
From doctors to engineers to carpet layers to massage therapists, more than one in three Americans is required to hold a license to work in their occupation. Broad consensus among researchers holds that licensure creates wage premiums by establishing economic monopolies, but according to Northwestern University research, licensure does not limit competition nor does it increase wages.
Categories: Content

Amazonian hunters deplete wildlife but don't empty forests

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
Conservationists can be 'cautiously optimistic' about the prospect of sustainable subsistence hunting by Amazonian communities -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UK).The research team spent over a year working with 60 Amazonian communities and hiked for miles through trackless forests to deploy nearly 400 motion-activated camera traps -- in a bid to understand which species are depleted by hunting and where.
Categories: Content

Worms learn to smell danger

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
University of Iowa researchers report that a roundworm can learn to put on alert a defense system important for protecting cells from damage. The finding could lead to a new approach for treating neurodegenerative diseases in humans caused by damaged cells.
Categories: Content

High blood pressure linked to common heart valve disorder

Eurekalert - Oct 17 2017 - 00:10
For the first time, a strong link has been established between high blood pressure and the most common heart valve disorder in high-income countries, by new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford.
Categories: Content