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Calbuco Volcano Erupts 7 Miles Into The Air

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 4:55pm

The Calbuco volcano, a 2,000 meter peak in southern Chile, sent a column of ash about 15 kilometers skywards twice on the night of April 22 and early the following morning. 

As the risk of deadly flows of ash and hot air was immediate, a 20 kilometer radius evacuation zone was declared.

The event was spectacularly visible from Puerto Montt, a city of nearly 200,000 inhabitants, only 30 km away. It seems to have begun within barely five hours of warning signs being first detected by local seismometers.

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Calbuco Volcano Erupts 7 Miles Into The Air

General - April 24, 2015 - 4:55pm

The Calbuco volcano, a 2,000 meter peak in southern Chile, sent a column of ash about 15 kilometers skywards twice on the night of April 22 and early the following morning. 

As the risk of deadly flows of ash and hot air was immediate, a 20 kilometer radius evacuation zone was declared.

The event was spectacularly visible from Puerto Montt, a city of nearly 200,000 inhabitants, only 30 km away. It seems to have begun within barely five hours of warning signs being first detected by local seismometers.

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Missing Eyes: Rare Mutation Cause Of Deformities

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 3:38pm

Researchers have solved a genetic mystery that has afflicted three unrelated families, and possibly others, for generations: The genetic basis for a variety of congenital eye malformations, including the complete absence of eyes. 


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Missing Eyes: Rare Mutation Cause Of Deformities

General - April 24, 2015 - 3:38pm

Researchers have solved a genetic mystery that has afflicted three unrelated families, and possibly others, for generations: The genetic basis for a variety of congenital eye malformations, including the complete absence of eyes. 


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Poison As Medicine And How Venom Can Sometimes Be A Savior

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 1:00pm
“I moved to California to die.”

Ellie Lobel was 27 when she was bitten by a tick and contracted Lyme disease. And she was not yet 45 when she decided to give up fighting for survival.

Caused by corkscrew-shaped bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, which enter the body through the bite of a tick, Lyme disease is diagnosed in around 300,000 people every year in the United States. It kills almost none of these people, and is by and large curable – if caught in time. If doctors correctly identify the cause of the illness early on, antibiotics can wipe out the bacteria quickly before they spread through the heart, joints and nervous system.


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Poison As Medicine And How Venom Can Sometimes Be A Savior

General - April 24, 2015 - 1:00pm
“I moved to California to die.”

Ellie Lobel was 27 when she was bitten by a tick and contracted Lyme disease. And she was not yet 45 when she decided to give up fighting for survival.

Caused by corkscrew-shaped bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, which enter the body through the bite of a tick, Lyme disease is diagnosed in around 300,000 people every year in the United States. It kills almost none of these people, and is by and large curable – if caught in time. If doctors correctly identify the cause of the illness early on, antibiotics can wipe out the bacteria quickly before they spread through the heart, joints and nervous system.


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Categories: News

Precautionary Principle: 85 Percent Of Surgeons Disregard Breast Screening Recommendation

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 12:56pm

We can complain about the cost of American health care but that is the price for doctors caring too much. While in Holland doctors can just unilaterally make the decision to let a patient die, in the United States doctors will continue to recommend tests even when recommendations are that they should be done half as often.


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Precautionary Principle: 85 Percent Of Surgeons Disregard Breast Screening Recommendation

General - April 24, 2015 - 12:56pm

We can complain about the cost of American health care but that is the price for doctors caring too much. While in Holland doctors can just unilaterally make the decision to let a patient die, in the United States doctors will continue to recommend tests even when recommendations are that they should be done half as often.


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Categories: News

Has UK Renewable Electricity Really Tripled?

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 12:30pm

Renewable electricity has nearly trebled under this government.

said Ed Davey, Liberal Democrat energy and climate change minister, during an environment debate held by the Daily Politics show.

Amid the climate of mistrust about claims made by politicians that tends to accompany election campaigns, it is reassuring to report that the evidence supports the minister’s statement.

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Has UK Renewable Electricity Really Tripled?

General - April 24, 2015 - 12:30pm

Renewable electricity has nearly trebled under this government.

said Ed Davey, Liberal Democrat energy and climate change minister, during an environment debate held by the Daily Politics show.

Amid the climate of mistrust about claims made by politicians that tends to accompany election campaigns, it is reassuring to report that the evidence supports the minister’s statement.

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Depression Leaves A Metabolic Signature On Mitochondria

General - April 24, 2015 - 12:28pm

Major depression comes with an unexpected metabolic signature, according to new findings.

Authors in search of genes that increase depression risk analyzed thousands of women. those with recurrent major depression and healthy controls, and found that many of the women with depression also had experienced adversity in childhood, including sexual abuse. 

The researchers noticed something rather unusual in the DNA. The samples taken from women with a history of stress-related depression contained more mitochondrial DNA than other samples.

"Our most notable finding is that the amount of mitochondrial DNA changes in response to stress," says Professor Jonathan Flint of the University of Oxford.


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Depression Leaves A Metabolic Signature On Mitochondria

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 12:28pm

Major depression comes with an unexpected metabolic signature, according to new findings.

Authors in search of genes that increase depression risk analyzed thousands of women. those with recurrent major depression and healthy controls, and found that many of the women with depression also had experienced adversity in childhood, including sexual abuse. 

The researchers noticed something rather unusual in the DNA. The samples taken from women with a history of stress-related depression contained more mitochondrial DNA than other samples.

"Our most notable finding is that the amount of mitochondrial DNA changes in response to stress," says Professor Jonathan Flint of the University of Oxford.


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Putting The Lab In The Patient - New Device Helps Tailor Personalized Cancer Treatment

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 7:00am

More than 100 drugs have been approved to treat cancer but predicting which ones will help a particular patient hasn't really been possible.

A new device may change that. It is an implantable device, about the size of the grain of rice, and can carry small doses of up to 30 different drugs. After implanting it in a tumor and letting the drugs diffuse into the tissue, researchers can measure how effectively each one kills the patient's cancer cells. Such a device could eliminate much of the guesswork now involved in choosing cancer treatments, says Oliver Jonas, a postdoc at MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and lead author of the paper in Science Translational Medicine.


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Putting The Lab In The Patient - New Device Helps Tailor Personalized Cancer Treatment

General - April 24, 2015 - 7:00am

More than 100 drugs have been approved to treat cancer but predicting which ones will help a particular patient hasn't really been possible.

A new device may change that. It is an implantable device, about the size of the grain of rice, and can carry small doses of up to 30 different drugs. After implanting it in a tumor and letting the drugs diffuse into the tissue, researchers can measure how effectively each one kills the patient's cancer cells. Such a device could eliminate much of the guesswork now involved in choosing cancer treatments, says Oliver Jonas, a postdoc at MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and lead author of the paper in Science Translational Medicine.


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Partisanship: 3 Stunning Charts

RealClearScience - April 24, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

It's Time to Go to Europa

RealClearScience - April 24, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

Magma Found Under Yellowstone

RealClearScience - April 24, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

Eating Our Last Avocados?

RealClearScience - April 24, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

Columbia's Lame Oz Defense

General - April 24, 2015 - 12:20am
Columbia University and seven other schools make up the prestigious Ivy League. But, sometimes things change and standards drop. It may be time to create a new group of schools, the Poison Ivy League, and perhaps Columbia should be its first member. 

Today's opinion piece in USA today is entitled "Columbia medical faculty: What do we do about Dr. Oz?" has a title that ends with a question mark. And well it should. 
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Categories: News

Columbia's Lame Oz Defense

Science2.0 - April 24, 2015 - 12:20am
Columbia University and seven other schools make up the prestigious Ivy League. But, sometimes things change and standards drop. It may be time to create a new group of schools, the Poison Ivy League, and perhaps Columbia should be its first member. 

Today's opinion piece in USA today is entitled "Columbia medical faculty: What do we do about Dr. Oz?" has a title that ends with a question mark. And well it should. 
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Categories: Science2.0