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Pediatricians Under Pressure From Parents To Spread Out Vaccine Schedule

Science2.0 - March 2, 2015 - 2:25pm
In 2008, President Obama suggested vaccines might be causing autism. In 2009, during the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, there was quickly a vaccine shortage, because the government refused to allow adjuvants, to boost vaccine effectiveness and use less raw material, or multi-dose vials, because they contained a preservative anti-vaccine believers claimed caused autism. 274,000 Americans were hospitalized.
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Pediatricians Under Pressure From Parents To Spread Out Vaccine Schedule

General - March 2, 2015 - 2:25pm
In 2008, President Obama suggested vaccines might be causing autism. In 2009, during the H1N1 swine flu pandemic, there was quickly a vaccine shortage, because the government refused to allow adjuvants, to boost vaccine effectiveness and use less raw material, or multi-dose vials, because they contained a preservative anti-vaccine believers claimed caused autism. 274,000 Americans were hospitalized.
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ALDH2 Enzyme Not Working? Beware Beer And Yogurt

Science2.0 - March 2, 2015 - 2:00pm


Researchers have found that by changing the selectivity of an enzyme, a small molecule could potentially be used to decrease the likelihood of alcohol-related cancers in an at-risk population.


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ALDH2 Enzyme Not Working? Beware Beer And Yogurt

General - March 2, 2015 - 2:00pm


Researchers have found that by changing the selectivity of an enzyme, a small molecule could potentially be used to decrease the likelihood of alcohol-related cancers in an at-risk population.


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Australia Should Consider Thorium Nuclear Power

General - March 2, 2015 - 2:00pm
Categories: News

Our Bright UV-Reflecting Wing Patches Will Settle This!

Science2.0 - March 2, 2015 - 1:31pm

Megaloprepus caerulatus. Credit: Andres Hernandez, STRI

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan, Inside Science

(Inside Science) -- In late April, rain begins to pool in the hollows of trees on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. The water-filled tree holes may seem insignificant, but they're prime real estate – and the sites of intense battles – to giant damselflies (Megaloprepus caerulatus) seeking mates.

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Our Bright UV-Reflecting Wing Patches Will Settle This!

General - March 2, 2015 - 1:31pm

Megaloprepus caerulatus. Credit: Andres Hernandez, STRI

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan, Inside Science

(Inside Science) -- In late April, rain begins to pool in the hollows of trees on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. The water-filled tree holes may seem insignificant, but they're prime real estate – and the sites of intense battles – to giant damselflies (Megaloprepus caerulatus) seeking mates.

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Categories: News

Most Common Genetic Disease In The West - New Treatment?

Science2.0 - March 2, 2015 - 10:57am

Hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common genetic disorder in the western world, and yet is barely known outside biology. In the US 1 in 9 people carry the mutation, though not necessarily the disease.

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Most Common Genetic Disease In The West - New Treatment?

General - March 2, 2015 - 10:57am

Hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common genetic disorder in the western world, and yet is barely known outside biology. In the US 1 in 9 people carry the mutation, though not necessarily the disease.

-->

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Categories: News

Secrets of Earth's Other Moon

RealClearScience - March 2, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

The Worst Pain Known to Man

RealClearScience - March 2, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

Do Black Holes Really Exist?

RealClearScience - March 2, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

Cherenkov Effect Improves Radiation Therapy For Patients With Cancer

Science2.0 - March 2, 2015 - 3:22am

The characteristic blue glow from a nuclear reactor is present in radiation therapy, too. Investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, led by Brian W. Pogue, PhD, and PhD candidates Adam K. Glaser and Rongxiao Zhang, published in Physics in Medicine and Biology how the complex parts of the blue light known as the Cherenkov Effect can be measured and used in dosimetry to make therapies safer and more effective.

"The beauty of using the light from the Cherenkov Effect for dosimetry is that it's the only current method that can reveal dosimetric information completely non-invasively in water or tissue," said Glaser.


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Cherenkov Effect Improves Radiation Therapy For Patients With Cancer

General - March 2, 2015 - 3:22am

The characteristic blue glow from a nuclear reactor is present in radiation therapy, too. Investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, led by Brian W. Pogue, PhD, and PhD candidates Adam K. Glaser and Rongxiao Zhang, published in Physics in Medicine and Biology how the complex parts of the blue light known as the Cherenkov Effect can be measured and used in dosimetry to make therapies safer and more effective.

"The beauty of using the light from the Cherenkov Effect for dosimetry is that it's the only current method that can reveal dosimetric information completely non-invasively in water or tissue," said Glaser.


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EEGs Predict A Movie's Success Better Than Surveys

Science2.0 - March 2, 2015 - 2:12am

75 percent of movies released to theaters lose money, making the film industry even less able to pick winners in the private sector than the government. Surely there has to be a better method than greenlighting a movie because another studio is doing the same movie, or because someone has heard of M. Night Shyamalan.

A new study finds that brain activity visible through electroencephalography (EEG) could be a better barometer of success, at least if making money is the goal. 


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Categories: Science2.0

EEGs Predict A Movie's Success Better Than Surveys

General - March 2, 2015 - 2:12am

75 percent of movies released to theaters lose money, making the film industry even less able to pick winners in the private sector than the government. Surely there has to be a better method than greenlighting a movie because another studio is doing the same movie, or because someone has heard of M. Night Shyamalan.

A new study finds that brain activity visible through electroencephalography (EEG) could be a better barometer of success, at least if making money is the goal. 


-->

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Categories: News

Why Early Triassic Swimming Reptile Fossil Tracks Preserved So Well

Science2.0 - March 1, 2015 - 10:49pm
Fossil "swim tracks," a type of vertebrate trace fossil gaining recognition in the field of paleontology, is  made by various tetrapods (four-footed land-living vertebrates) as they traveled through water under buoyant or semibuoyant conditions.

They occur in high numbers in deposits from the Early Triassic,  between the Permian and Jurassic 250 to 200 million years ago. Major extinction events mark the start and end of the Triassic but it is a but of a mystery why tracks from the period are so abundant and well preserved.


Tracy J. Thomson next to a block with numerous swim tracks in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah.  -->

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Categories: Science2.0

Why Early Triassic Swimming Reptile Fossil Tracks Preserved So Well

General - March 1, 2015 - 10:49pm
Fossil "swim tracks," a type of vertebrate trace fossil gaining recognition in the field of paleontology, is  made by various tetrapods (four-footed land-living vertebrates) as they traveled through water under buoyant or semibuoyant conditions.

They occur in high numbers in deposits from the Early Triassic,  between the Permian and Jurassic 250 to 200 million years ago. Major extinction events mark the start and end of the Triassic but it is a but of a mystery why tracks from the period are so abundant and well preserved.


Tracy J. Thomson next to a block with numerous swim tracks in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah.  -->

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Categories: News