Feed aggregator

Want To Catch A Killer? Know Your Science.

ACSH - 2 hours 46 min ago

A new report on expanding the use of science to estimate time of death better in suspected homicides was just published. 

Categories: ACSH

Reminding people about vaccinations can increase rates of immunization

Eurekalert - 4 hours 59 min ago
Rates of immunization against infectious diseases in children and adults are improving, but under-vaccination remains a problem that results in vaccine-preventable deaths and illnesses.
Categories: Content

Fake News Award for Science Goes To... The New York Times!

ACSH - Jan 17 2018 - 18:01

Much buzz has surrounded President Trump's "Fake News Awards." Given that part of our mission is debunking pseudoscience and bogus health claims, we felt obliged to offer our own Fake News Award... for junk science.

Websites like Food Babe, Mercola, InfoWars, and Natural News are perennial contenders. But giving them the award is too easy and predictable. Anyone with a halfway decent frontal lobe knows that these websites are pure garbage.

Categories: ACSH

Diagnosing President Trump's Medical Statement: 'Fit For Duty'

ACSH - Jan 17 2018 - 16:01

President Donald Trump completed his first periodic medical examination at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. His White House physician, Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, released a statement of his findings and held a protracted press conference. His conclusions discussed here. 

Categories: ACSH

ProPublica Is Wrong In Charging Racial Bias In An Algorithm

ACSH - Jan 17 2018 - 14:01

ProPublica accused a predictive algorithm, used in sentencing criminal defendants, with being racially bias. A new study suggests that the narrative is wrong.

Categories: ACSH

Your Dishwasher is Disgusting, But It's OK

ACSH - Jan 17 2018 - 13:01

Bacteria are everywhere, surviving in even the most extreme environments like hot springs and ice cubes. 

So, if you think that your appliances that use hot water, like a dishwasher, are sterile - you are wrong. In fact, they are not even that clean. 

Bacteria can survive a lot

Categories: ACSH

Fake Honey Is A Problem And Science Can Solve It - If Government Gets Out Of The Way

ACSH - Jan 17 2018 - 11:01

Adulterated honey, meaning it has been diluted with other substances, has been an issue for as far back as honey has been sold.(1) One of the reasons we know so much about the composition of the sweetener is due to efforts from the 1960s on to fight fraud. Today, it is most likely to be mixed with high fructose corn syrup because, as you probably know, that is about the same in fructose.

Categories: ACSH

Reader's Digest, Newsweek, Fox News, NPR, And More Media Links Last Week

ACSH - Jan 17 2018 - 10:01

1. NPR linked to our work on the flu, which we predicted would be a concern for the US after seeing it go through Australia, with 5 Things You Need To Know.

Categories: ACSH

On The Qualifications Of Peer Reviewers For Scientific Papers

Science 2.0 - Jan 17 2018 - 09:01
Peer review is the backbone of high quality scientific publications. Although the idea that only articles that are approved by a set of anonymous nitpickers can ever see the light of publication on "serious" journals is old and perfectible, there is currently no valid alternative to identify verified, rigorous scientific work, and to filter out unsubstantiated claims, and methodologically unsound results - the scientific analogue of "fake news". -->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

'Two Brothers' Mummies - DNA Shows They Actually Are

Science 2.0 - Jan 17 2018 - 09:01
The 'Two Brothers' mummies, discovered by the modern world in 1907, reside in the Manchester Museum  and are the mummies of, unsurprisingly, two elite men (they didn't mummify peasants), Khnum-nakht and Nakht-ank.

The remains date to around 1800 B.C. but there has always been argument about whether or not the two are actually related even though they share a joint burial site at Deir Rifeh, a village 250 miles south of Cairo. Hieroglyphic inscriptions on the coffins indicated that both men were the sons of an unnamed local governor and had mothers with the same name, Khnum-aa. It was then the tomb and the men became known as the Two Brothers.
-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Slower walking speed in the elderly may be explained by loss of muscle strength and mass

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Research recently published in The Journal of Physiology has found that elderly people walk at a slower speed and tire more quickly because of loss of strength and mass in leg muscles. Using computer simulations they found that these physiological changes explain the slower walking speed preferred by the elderly, and that a focus on building up these leg muscles may be the only effective way to improve elderly walking.
Categories: Content

Microwaves could be as bad for the environment as cars suggests new research

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Microwaves usage across the EU alone emits as much carbon dioxide as nearly seven million cars according to a new study by the University of Manchester. Researchers at the university have carried out the first ever comprehensive study of the environmental impacts of microwaves, considering their whole life cycle, from 'cradle to grave.'
Categories: Content

Whole-population testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations is cost effective

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Screening the entire population for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations, as opposed to just those at high-risk of carrying this mutation, is cost effective and could prevent more ovarian and breast cancers than the current clinical approach, according to research published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
Categories: Content

Use of primate 'actors' misleading millions of viewers

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
More needs to be done to educate audiences, including viewers at home and filmmakers, on the unethical nature of using primates in the film industry, says a leading expert in a new study.
Categories: Content

New drug combination helps kickstart the immune system to fight back against cancer

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Scientists from King's College London have found a way to boost the immune system to help it fight back against cancer. The breakthrough involves the first ever use of a combination of chemotherapy and a drug being trialed as a treatment for neonatal jaundice, that together help kick start the body's natural defenses.
Categories: Content

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Columbia Engineering researchers have developed a new method for improving T cell manufacture by focusing on the materials involved in this process. Their study uses a polymer mesh to activate the T cells, a critical step for their production. This approach simplifies processing compared to systems in use today. In addition, making the fibers out of a mechanically soft material improved T cell growth, outperforming the current gold standard on several fronts. (Advanced Biosystems)
Categories: Content

Presurgical targeted therapy delays relapse of high-risk stage 3 melanoma

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
A pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Lancet Oncology. Patients who had no sign of disease at surgery after combination treatment did not progress to metastasis.
Categories: Content

Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.
Categories: Content

Duration of treatment rather than dose more strongly associated with opioid misuse after surgery

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Prescribing higher opioid doses for shorter durations may be a more effective way to treat pain after surgery, while minimizing the risk of longer term misuse and addiction, suggest US researchers in The BMJ today.
Categories: Content

New study validates clotting risk factors in chronic kidney disease

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
In late 2017, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine discovered and published a potential treatment target to prevent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients from developing thrombosis (blood clots) without causing bleeding complications. They found that boosting a regulatory protein named STUB1 decreased the abundance of tissue factor (TF) and prevented blood vessel blockages in experimental models. Now, these same researchers have tested other aspect of this hypothesis in humans with promising results.
Categories: Content