news aggregator

Fortune 500 Employees Will Pay More For Health Insurance - Government, Other Unions Will Be Okay

Science2.0 - September 19, 2014 - 2:30am

The wage gap between government employees and the private sector is already large and growing. Now there will be a gap in benefits due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (AKA Obamacare) also.

Employees working for Fortune 500 companies can expect to pay higher employee contributions for their health insurance, according to a survey of chief human resource officer.

Patrick Wright, a professor in strategic human resource management at the University of South Carolina, directs the annual the HR@Moore Survey of Chief HR Officers. The survey is distributed to more than 560 CHROs of Fortune 500 companies and members of HR Policy Association, a professional organization. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Fortune 500 Employees Will Pay More For Health Insurance - Government, Other Unions Will Be Okay

General - September 19, 2014 - 2:30am

The wage gap between government employees and the private sector is already large and growing. Now there will be a gap in benefits due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (AKA Obamacare) also.

Employees working for Fortune 500 companies can expect to pay higher employee contributions for their health insurance, according to a survey of chief human resource officer.

Patrick Wright, a professor in strategic human resource management at the University of South Carolina, directs the annual the HR@Moore Survey of Chief HR Officers. The survey is distributed to more than 560 CHROs of Fortune 500 companies and members of HR Policy Association, a professional organization. 


-->

read more

Categories: News

Tree Rings Keep A Record Of Arroyo Evolution

Science2.0 - September 19, 2014 - 1:22am

A new study uses tree rings to document arroyo evolution along the lower Rio Puerco and Chaco Wash in northern New Mexico.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Tree Rings Keep A Record Of Arroyo Evolution

General - September 19, 2014 - 1:22am

A new study uses tree rings to document arroyo evolution along the lower Rio Puerco and Chaco Wash in northern New Mexico.


read more

Categories: News

Fracking Blamed For Too Many Hotel Rooms

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 11:00pm

Five years ago, it was good luck finding a hotel anywhere near the rural areas where natural gas extraction - fracking - was taking place.

The boom in natural gas meant a boom in employment and a boom in hotel rooms to keep workers. The wealth boosted Pennsylvania and other energy-dense states while most of the country remains mired in economic malaise. But over time people buy homes rather than rent hotel rooms and now there may be too many, says hospitality management scholars at Penn State.

"Demand is still high in many of the counties in the Marcellus Shale region, but the occupancy rate is starting to come down," says associate professor Daniel Mount. "The case could be made that this is a sign that hotels were overbuilt."


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Fracking Blamed For Too Many Hotel Rooms

General - September 18, 2014 - 11:00pm

Five years ago, it was good luck finding a hotel anywhere near the rural areas where natural gas extraction - fracking - was taking place.

The boom in natural gas meant a boom in employment and a boom in hotel rooms to keep workers. The wealth boosted Pennsylvania and other energy-dense states while most of the country remains mired in economic malaise. But over time people buy homes rather than rent hotel rooms and now there may be too many, says hospitality management scholars at Penn State.

"Demand is still high in many of the counties in the Marcellus Shale region, but the occupancy rate is starting to come down," says associate professor Daniel Mount. "The case could be made that this is a sign that hotels were overbuilt."


-->

read more

Categories: News

Miranda: Icy Moon Of Uranus Also Deformed By Tidal Heating

General - September 18, 2014 - 9:49pm

Miranda is a small, icy moon of Uranus and one of the most visually striking and enigmatic bodies in the solar system.

Despite its relatively small size, Miranda appears to have experienced an episode of intense resurfacing that resulted in the formation of at least three remarkable and unique surface features -- polygonal-shaped regions called coronae. 

These coronae are visible in Miranda's southern hemisphere, and each one is at least 200 km across. Arden corona, the largest, has ridges and troughs with up to 2 km of relief. Elsinore corona has an outer belt that is approx. 80 km wide, relatively smooth, and elevated above the surrounding terrain by approx. 100 m. Inverness corona has a trapezoidal shape with a large, bright chevron at its center.


read more

Categories: News

Miranda: Icy Moon Of Uranus Also Deformed By Tidal Heating

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 9:49pm

Miranda is a small, icy moon of Uranus and one of the most visually striking and enigmatic bodies in the solar system.

Despite its relatively small size, Miranda appears to have experienced an episode of intense resurfacing that resulted in the formation of at least three remarkable and unique surface features -- polygonal-shaped regions called coronae. 

These coronae are visible in Miranda's southern hemisphere, and each one is at least 200 km across. Arden corona, the largest, has ridges and troughs with up to 2 km of relief. Elsinore corona has an outer belt that is approx. 80 km wide, relatively smooth, and elevated above the surrounding terrain by approx. 100 m. Inverness corona has a trapezoidal shape with a large, bright chevron at its center.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

'Sleep Node' In The Brain Discovered

General - September 18, 2014 - 9:41pm

Researchers at Harvard School of Medicine and the University at Buffalo have discovered a sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem, only the second "sleep node" identified in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep. 

Writing in Nature Neuroscience, the study demonstrates that fully half of all of the brain's sleep-promoting activity originates from the parafacial zone (PZ) in the brainstem. The brainstem is a primordial part of the brain that regulates basic functions necessary for survival, such as breathing, blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature.


read more

Categories: News

'Sleep Node' In The Brain Discovered

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 9:41pm

Researchers at Harvard School of Medicine and the University at Buffalo have discovered a sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem, only the second "sleep node" identified in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep. 

Writing in Nature Neuroscience, the study demonstrates that fully half of all of the brain's sleep-promoting activity originates from the parafacial zone (PZ) in the brainstem. The brainstem is a primordial part of the brain that regulates basic functions necessary for survival, such as breathing, blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

How To Spot A Bad Decision: Pupil Size

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 8:44pm
A new paper believes it can measure the precision with which people make decisions - by pupil size before they are presented with any information.

Spontaneous, moment-to-moment fluctuations in pupil size predicted how a selection of participants varied in their successful decision making. A larger pupil size indicated poorer upcoming task performance, due to more variability in the decisions made once the relevant information was presented. The authors also found that certain individuals who had the largest pupils overall also tended to be the least consistent in their decisions.

read more

Categories: Science2.0

How To Spot A Bad Decision: Pupil Size

General - September 18, 2014 - 8:44pm
A new paper believes it can measure the precision with which people make decisions - by pupil size before they are presented with any information.

Spontaneous, moment-to-moment fluctuations in pupil size predicted how a selection of participants varied in their successful decision making. A larger pupil size indicated poorer upcoming task performance, due to more variability in the decisions made once the relevant information was presented. The authors also found that certain individuals who had the largest pupils overall also tended to be the least consistent in their decisions.

read more

Categories: News

UM171: New Molecule Allows For 10X Increase In Adult Stem Cell Transplants

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 8:08pm
Investigators have announced discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. Umbilical cord blood contains adult stem cells used for transplants aimed at curing a number of blood-related diseases, including leukemia, myeloma and lymphoma.

For many patients this therapy comprises a treatment of last resort. 

read more

Categories: Science2.0

UM171: New Molecule Allows For 10X Increase In Adult Stem Cell Transplants

General - September 18, 2014 - 8:08pm
Investigators have announced discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. Umbilical cord blood contains adult stem cells used for transplants aimed at curing a number of blood-related diseases, including leukemia, myeloma and lymphoma.

For many patients this therapy comprises a treatment of last resort. 

read more

Categories: News

Ethics, Group Psychology And Meteora – A Tour Group Dilemma

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 7:30pm

Metoera. Credit:Panos Photographia/Flickr

By Steve Ellen, Monash University

Everyday life is full of mini-ethical moments. Do you own up to being under charged? Do you push in when the traffic is heavy and you’re running late? Do you hassle your kid’s teacher to get little Jimmie or Jane an advantage?

Most of us do our best, but various emotions, motives, and practicalities act to push us to our limits. Sometimes our limits are breached – mine were on a recent tour in Greece.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Ethics, Group Psychology And Meteora – A Tour Group Dilemma

General - September 18, 2014 - 7:30pm

Metoera. Credit:Panos Photographia/Flickr

By Steve Ellen, Monash University

Everyday life is full of mini-ethical moments. Do you own up to being under charged? Do you push in when the traffic is heavy and you’re running late? Do you hassle your kid’s teacher to get little Jimmie or Jane an advantage?

Most of us do our best, but various emotions, motives, and practicalities act to push us to our limits. Sometimes our limits are breached – mine were on a recent tour in Greece.

-->

read more

Categories: News

Even One Dose Of Antidepressant Dramatically Changes The Brain

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 7:01pm

Even a single dose of  the commonly prescribed antidepressant SSRI (serotonin reuptake inhibitor) is enough to produce dramatic changes in the functional architecture of the human brain. Brain scans taken of people before and after an acute dose of SSRI reveal changes in connectivity within three hours, according to results in Current Biology.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Even One Dose Of Antidepressant Dramatically Changes The Brain

General - September 18, 2014 - 7:01pm

Even a single dose of  the commonly prescribed antidepressant SSRI (serotonin reuptake inhibitor) is enough to produce dramatic changes in the functional architecture of the human brain. Brain scans taken of people before and after an acute dose of SSRI reveal changes in connectivity within three hours, according to results in Current Biology.


-->

read more

Categories: News

Leukemia's Waterloo: The Battle For Cell Production

Science2.0 - September 18, 2014 - 6:30pm
To fight leukemia, we have to fight on its terms, and that means understanding the nature of the fight for superiority between mutated genes and normal genes, according to a paper that investigated Acute Myeloid Leukemia to understand why leukemic cells are not able to develop normally into mature blood cells.

Stem cells in the bone marrow generate billions of different blood cells each day. The process resembles a production line with genes acting as regulators to control each step of the blood formation. Leukemia arises when the DNA encoding regulators in the stem cells is changed by a mutation. When a mutation occurs in the relevant regulator genes, the finely balanced order of the production line is disrupted with drastic consequences. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Leukemia's Waterloo: The Battle For Cell Production

General - September 18, 2014 - 6:30pm
To fight leukemia, we have to fight on its terms, and that means understanding the nature of the fight for superiority between mutated genes and normal genes, according to a paper that investigated Acute Myeloid Leukemia to understand why leukemic cells are not able to develop normally into mature blood cells.

Stem cells in the bone marrow generate billions of different blood cells each day. The process resembles a production line with genes acting as regulators to control each step of the blood formation. Leukemia arises when the DNA encoding regulators in the stem cells is changed by a mutation. When a mutation occurs in the relevant regulator genes, the finely balanced order of the production line is disrupted with drastic consequences. 
-->

read more

Categories: News