Feed aggregator

No World Isn't About To End - Terral Croft's Fantasy 'black Star' At The Far Side Of The Sun

Science 2.0 - 6 hours 12 min ago

This is another silly story that is scaring people. The claim is that a 'black star' (??) at the far side of the sun is going to somehow send powerful earthquakes to Earth on Sunday 19th November. There is no truth to this, it's just a made up fantasy like a script for a bad movie. Anyway we are getting so many comments in our Doomsday Debunked Facebook group and many PM's also from people who are having panic attacks about it that I thought I should do another post here. Both to help those scared and to alert others to the issues, how these stories, keep getting promoted right to the top of Google News by its algorithm, and are scaring our young children and young adults.

-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

My Interview On Physics Today

Science 2.0 - Nov 17 2017 - 18:11
Following the appearance of Kent Staley's review of my book "Anomaly!" in the November 2017 issue of Physics Today, the online site of the magazine offers, starting today, an interview with yours truly. I think the piece is quite readable and I encourage you to give it a look. Here I only quote a couple of passages for the laziest readers. -->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

7-Year-Old Future Brain Surgeon Better Science Communicator Than Many ‘Experts’

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 16:11

What's the secret to a 7-year-old wowing the internet with her knowledge of neurotransmitters and synapses? How she communicates the message. Learn more here.

Categories: ACSH

Will Position-Specific Football Helmets Reduce NFL Concussions?

Science 2.0 - Nov 17 2017 - 15:11

By Chris Gorski, Inside Science -- Hard-shelled football helmets first emerged nearly 80 years ago to protect against catastrophic head injuries like skull fractures and brain hemorrhages, and they have evolved over the decades to offer better protection. Recently, public attention has increasingly focused on other consequences of hits to the head, including concussions and long-term degenerative diseases such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

-->

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

As Algae Flourishes Nationwide, So Do Health Concerns

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 14:11

For the most part, algae, that green ooze found floating on various bodies of water, has long been considered a temporary issue. It blooms into an annoyance and eventually dissipates, and disappears.

Categories: ACSH

Endangered Species Act: The Frog That Jumped The Shark

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 11:11

How did a frog that doesn't live in Louisiana get a habitat there? It was part of a sue-and-settle agreement arrangement between the government an environmental group, and it could cause the Supreme Court to dismantle the Endangered Species Act.

Categories: ACSH

Some Swiss Doctors Prescribe Homeopathic 'Remedies'

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 10:11

'Switzerland' brings to mind money, delicious dark chocolate, Alps, and watches. Now we can add homeopathy to the list, because  some Swiss doctors (regular MDs, not naturopaths) are prescribing homeopathic 'remedies' to their patients. Some are doing so for the placebo effect, but others actually appear to believe the hype!

 

Categories: ACSH

The Flu Will be Here Next Week – and It Can Kill You

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 07:11

 

 
Categories: ACSH

The Flu Will be Here Next Week and it Can Kill You

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 07:11

 

 
Categories: ACSH

Thanksgiving Dinner Chemical Terrors In Every Course - 'Organic' Or Not

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 06:11

The traffic on Thanksgiving is killer. If you happen to be driving to Aunt Wilma's in Connecticut you will find this out for yourself. But what about when you arrive? Which is riskier? The trip or the meal (1)?

Categories: ACSH

Is The Wild West Of Stem Cell Therapies Coming To An End?

ACSH - Nov 17 2017 - 04:11

Newly released guidelines from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) suggest illegitimate, unproven stem cell uses might become a thing of the past.

Categories: ACSH

Professor publishes archaeological research on social inequality

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
The origins of social inequality might lie in the remnants of ancient Eurasia's agricultural societies, according to an article recently published in the major science journal Nature.
Categories: Content

A walk at the mall or the park? New study shows, for moms and daughters, a walk in the park is best

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
University of Illinois family studies researchers believed that if the attention restoration theory, which describes how interaction with natural environments can reduce mental fatigue and restore attention, worked for individuals it might also work for families to help facilitate more positive family interactions and family cohesion. They tested their theory by looking at sets of moms and daughters who were asked to take a walk together in nature and a walk in a mall.
Categories: Content

A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation. Studies have shown that a mothers' reaction -- positive or negative -- to her child's negative emotions can predict whether her child develops the ability to effectively regulate his emotions and behavior. A new University of Illinois study explores potential predictors of mothers' supportive or non-supportive behavior during emotional challenges.
Categories: Content

Hibernating ground squirrels provide clues to new stroke treatments

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels. While the animals' brains experience dramatically reduced blood flow during hibernation, just like human patients after a certain type of stroke, the squirrels emerge from their extended naps suffering no ill effects. Now, a team of NIH-funded scientists has identified a potential drug that could grant the same resilience to stroke patients.
Categories: Content

Breakthrough could launch organic electronics beyond cell phone screens

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
A discovery by an international team of researchers from Princeton University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Humboldt University in Berlin points the way to more widespread use of an advanced technology generally known as organic electronics.
Categories: Content

Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor.
Categories: Content

Not an illusion: Clever use of mirrors boosts performance of light-sheet microscope

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
Using a simple 'mirror trick' and not-so-simple computational analysis, scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have considerably improved the speed, efficiency, and resolution of a light-sheet microscope, with broad applications for enhanced imaging of live cells and embryos.
Categories: Content

Like a baby: The vicious cycle of childhood obesity and snoring

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
In a new longitudinal observational study, scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) looked at the relationships among maternal snoring, childhood snoring and children's metabolic characteristics -- including body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance, which reflects future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease -- in approximately 1,100 children followed from gestation through early adolescence.
Categories: Content

Argonne to install Comanche system to explore ARM technology for HPC

Eurekalert - Nov 17 2017 - 00:11
Argonne National Laboratory is collaborating with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to provide system software expertise and a development ecosystem for a future high-performance computing (HPC) system based on 64-bit ARM processors.
Categories: Content