news aggregator

We're Overdosing On Medicine: Time To Embrace Uncertainty Instead

Science2.0 - 4 hours 9 min ago

The more we learn about the problem of too much medicine and what’s driving it, the harder it seems to imagine effective solutions. Winding back unnecessary tests and treatments will require a raft of reforms across medical research, education and regulation.

But to enable those reforms to take root, we may need to cultivate a fundamental shift in our thinking about the limits of medicine.

It’s time to free ourselves from the dangerous fantasy that medical technology can deliver us from the realities of uncertainty, aging and death.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

We're Overdosing On Medicine: Time To Embrace Uncertainty Instead

General - 4 hours 9 min ago

The more we learn about the problem of too much medicine and what’s driving it, the harder it seems to imagine effective solutions. Winding back unnecessary tests and treatments will require a raft of reforms across medical research, education and regulation.

But to enable those reforms to take root, we may need to cultivate a fundamental shift in our thinking about the limits of medicine.

It’s time to free ourselves from the dangerous fantasy that medical technology can deliver us from the realities of uncertainty, aging and death.

-->

read more

Categories: News

Clinical Validation For LOXO-101 Against TRK Fusion Cancer

Science2.0 - 8 hours 15 min ago

Loxo Oncology, Inc. and The University of Colorado Cancer Center today announced the publication of a research brief describing the first patient with a tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) fusion cancer enrolled in the Phase 1 dose escalation trial of LOXO-101, the only selective TRK inhibitor in clinical development. Additional contributors to the paper include the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health&Science University and Foundation Medicine, Inc. (Nasdaq:FMI).


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Clinical Validation For LOXO-101 Against TRK Fusion Cancer

General - 8 hours 15 min ago

Loxo Oncology, Inc. and The University of Colorado Cancer Center today announced the publication of a research brief describing the first patient with a tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) fusion cancer enrolled in the Phase 1 dose escalation trial of LOXO-101, the only selective TRK inhibitor in clinical development. Additional contributors to the paper include the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health&Science University and Foundation Medicine, Inc. (Nasdaq:FMI).


read more

Categories: News

Resolving The Cancer/Diet Paradox

Science2.0 - 8 hours 43 min ago

How much does diet affect the cancer patient? Do "antioxidants" really play an important role in health - or are they causing more cancers than they cure? And what exactly is the relationship between obesity and cancer?

The latest Special Issue in ecancermedicalscience collects four original articles from experts in cancer and metabolism, addressing the hottest areas of research in this rapidly developing field.

"In our clinical practice, cancer patients often ask 'Doctor, is there something specific I should eat or avoid eating?'" says Guest Editor of this Special Issue, Dr Luca Mazzarella of the European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Resolving The Cancer/Diet Paradox

General - 8 hours 43 min ago

How much does diet affect the cancer patient? Do "antioxidants" really play an important role in health - or are they causing more cancers than they cure? And what exactly is the relationship between obesity and cancer?

The latest Special Issue in ecancermedicalscience collects four original articles from experts in cancer and metabolism, addressing the hottest areas of research in this rapidly developing field.

"In our clinical practice, cancer patients often ask 'Doctor, is there something specific I should eat or avoid eating?'" says Guest Editor of this Special Issue, Dr Luca Mazzarella of the European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.


-->

read more

Categories: News

Earth’s Magnetic Field May Be 4 Billion Years Old

Science2.0 - 8 hours 43 min ago
Since 2010, the best estimate of the age of Earth’s magnetic field has been 3.45 billion years but new research says the magnetic field is far older. John Tarduno, a geophysicist at the University of Rochester and a leading expert on Earth’s magnetic field, and his team of researchers say they believe the Earth’s magnetic field is at least four billion years old.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Earth’s Magnetic Field May Be 4 Billion Years Old

General - 8 hours 43 min ago
Since 2010, the best estimate of the age of Earth’s magnetic field has been 3.45 billion years but new research says the magnetic field is far older. John Tarduno, a geophysicist at the University of Rochester and a leading expert on Earth’s magnetic field, and his team of researchers say they believe the Earth’s magnetic field is at least four billion years old.
-->

read more

Categories: News

Non-Genetic Cancer Mechanism Found

Science2.0 - 10 hours 1 min ago

Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found. The discovery is a major breakthrough because genetic aberrations have been seen as the main cause of almost all cancer. 


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Non-Genetic Cancer Mechanism Found

General - 10 hours 1 min ago

Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found. The discovery is a major breakthrough because genetic aberrations have been seen as the main cause of almost all cancer. 


read more

Categories: News

Parasitic Flatworms Flout Global Biodiversity Patterns

Science2.0 - 13 hours 15 min ago

The odds of being attacked and castrated by a variety of parasitic flatworms increases for marine horn snails the farther they are found from the tropics. A Smithsonian-led research team discovered this exception to an otherwise globally observed pattern--usually biodiversity is greatest in the tropics and decreases toward the poles.

The study makes a case for using host-parasite relationships as a tool to understand why there are typically more species--and more interactions between species--in the tropics than anywhere else in the world.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Parasitic Flatworms Flout Global Biodiversity Patterns

General - 13 hours 15 min ago

The odds of being attacked and castrated by a variety of parasitic flatworms increases for marine horn snails the farther they are found from the tropics. A Smithsonian-led research team discovered this exception to an otherwise globally observed pattern--usually biodiversity is greatest in the tropics and decreases toward the poles.

The study makes a case for using host-parasite relationships as a tool to understand why there are typically more species--and more interactions between species--in the tropics than anywhere else in the world.


read more

Categories: News

What If We Can 'Pre-Diagnose' Autism In Babies?

Science2.0 - 13 hours 45 min ago
For children with autism, early intervention is critical. Therapies and education – especially in the first two years of life – can facilitate a child’s social development, reduce familial stress and ultimately improve quality of life.

But while we can reliably diagnose autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 24 months, most children are diagnosed much later.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

What If We Can 'Pre-Diagnose' Autism In Babies?

General - 13 hours 45 min ago
For children with autism, early intervention is critical. Therapies and education – especially in the first two years of life – can facilitate a child’s social development, reduce familial stress and ultimately improve quality of life.

But while we can reliably diagnose autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 24 months, most children are diagnosed much later.

-->

read more

Categories: News

For Now We See Through A Brewing Class, Darkly

Science2.0 - August 2, 2015 - 12:54am

Next time you are in your local grocery store, step in to look a little more closely at the beer cooler. Amid the brightly colored, creative packaging lies the final battle for the ultimate goal – your purchases.

But, what battles were fought to get the beer to that particular cooler? More importantly, what might those battles say about larger trends in business today?

At Miami University’s Farmer School of Business, we designed an experiential class to go in depth with these issues, leveraging the lessons of the beer industries as a way to better understand larger trends in business strategy and supply chains.

What can the beer industry teach us?


read more

Categories: Science2.0

For Now We See Through A Brewing Class, Darkly

General - August 2, 2015 - 12:54am

Next time you are in your local grocery store, step in to look a little more closely at the beer cooler. Amid the brightly colored, creative packaging lies the final battle for the ultimate goal – your purchases.

But, what battles were fought to get the beer to that particular cooler? More importantly, what might those battles say about larger trends in business today?

At Miami University’s Farmer School of Business, we designed an experiential class to go in depth with these issues, leveraging the lessons of the beer industries as a way to better understand larger trends in business strategy and supply chains.

What can the beer industry teach us?


read more

Categories: News

Psychologists Link Premature Birth To Withdrawn Personality

Science2.0 - August 2, 2015 - 12:54am

A new paper links adults born very premature with being socially withdrawn and displaying signs of autism. The work was led by Professor Dieter Wolke at the department of psychology and Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick. He and coauthors correlate adults born very preterm scored highly for displaying a socially withdrawn personality, indicated by autistic features, neuroticism, introversion and decreased risk taking.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Psychologists Link Premature Birth To Withdrawn Personality

General - August 2, 2015 - 12:54am

A new paper links adults born very premature with being socially withdrawn and displaying signs of autism. The work was led by Professor Dieter Wolke at the department of psychology and Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick. He and coauthors correlate adults born very preterm scored highly for displaying a socially withdrawn personality, indicated by autistic features, neuroticism, introversion and decreased risk taking.


read more

Categories: News

Multi-Meter Sea Level Rise This Century? That's Not A Consensus

Science2.0 - August 2, 2015 - 12:54am

There’s a new study that’s getting a fair amount of attention in the climate science community and the popular press.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Multi-Meter Sea Level Rise This Century? That's Not A Consensus

General - August 2, 2015 - 12:54am

There’s a new study that’s getting a fair amount of attention in the climate science community and the popular press.


-->

read more

Categories: News