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Want A Better Sex Life? Change A Diaper

Science2.0 - August 25, 2015 - 1:30pm

Do you want a better sex life and a better relationship to go with it? Sociologists say surveys show that if men take up more of the child-care duties, splitting them equally with their female partners, heterosexual couples have more satisfaction with their relationships and their sex lives, according to new research by Georgia State University sociologists.

Daniel L. Carlson, along with graduate students Sarah Hanson and Andrea Fitzroy, all of Georgia State University, used data from more than 900 heterosexual couples' responses in the 2006 Marital Relationship Study (MARS). 

They found that when women were responsible for most or all of the child care, both parties reported both the lowest quality relationships and sex lives.


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Categories: Science2.0

Want A Better Sex Life? Change A Diaper

General - August 25, 2015 - 1:30pm

Do you want a better sex life and a better relationship to go with it? Sociologists say surveys show that if men take up more of the child-care duties, splitting them equally with their female partners, heterosexual couples have more satisfaction with their relationships and their sex lives, according to new research by Georgia State University sociologists.

Daniel L. Carlson, along with graduate students Sarah Hanson and Andrea Fitzroy, all of Georgia State University, used data from more than 900 heterosexual couples' responses in the 2006 Marital Relationship Study (MARS). 

They found that when women were responsible for most or all of the child care, both parties reported both the lowest quality relationships and sex lives.


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Categories: News

Up Watching News, Down Playing Video Games: Spirituality Varies Throughout The Day

Science2.0 - August 25, 2015 - 1:00pm

Does watching the news make you lose faith in a higher purpose? Does taking out an army of terrorists alone without so much as a scratch make you feel like you must have a divine gift? An analysis of cellphone data shows that spiritual awareness does vary based on activity, rather than being constant, according to sociologists at the American Sociological Association meeting who say that people had the highest levels of spiritual awareness in the morning and while engaged in activities such as praying, worship, and meditation. Spiritual awareness also was high when people listened to music, read, or exercised. It was low while people were doing work-related activities or playing video games. 


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Up Watching News, Down Playing Video Games: Spirituality Varies Throughout The Day

General - August 25, 2015 - 1:00pm

Does watching the news make you lose faith in a higher purpose? Does taking out an army of terrorists alone without so much as a scratch make you feel like you must have a divine gift? An analysis of cellphone data shows that spiritual awareness does vary based on activity, rather than being constant, according to sociologists at the American Sociological Association meeting who say that people had the highest levels of spiritual awareness in the morning and while engaged in activities such as praying, worship, and meditation. Spiritual awareness also was high when people listened to music, read, or exercised. It was low while people were doing work-related activities or playing video games. 


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Categories: News

Coffee Makes You Regular - And Regular Coffee May Improve Survival In Colon Cancer

Science2.0 - August 25, 2015 - 12:27pm

Regular consumption of caffeinated coffee may help prevent the return of colon cancer after treatment and improve the chances of a cure, according to a new study.

The patients, all of them treated with surgery and chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer, had the greatest benefit from consuming four or more cups of coffee a day (about 460 milligrams of caffeine), according to the study. These patients were 42 percent less likely to have their cancer return than non-coffee drinkers, and were 33 percent less likely to die from cancer or any other cause.


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Coffee Makes You Regular - And Regular Coffee May Improve Survival In Colon Cancer

General - August 25, 2015 - 12:27pm

Regular consumption of caffeinated coffee may help prevent the return of colon cancer after treatment and improve the chances of a cure, according to a new study.

The patients, all of them treated with surgery and chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer, had the greatest benefit from consuming four or more cups of coffee a day (about 460 milligrams of caffeine), according to the study. These patients were 42 percent less likely to have their cancer return than non-coffee drinkers, and were 33 percent less likely to die from cancer or any other cause.


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Categories: News

There's No Wild Bee Colony Collapse Either

Science2.0 - August 25, 2015 - 12:16pm

In a dramatic 2013 cover story, Time warned of “A World Without Bees,” subtitled “The price we’ll pay if we don’t figure out what’s killing the honeybee.” Its author argued that the class of agricultural pesticides know as neonicotinoids was killing the honeybee and that the planet would starve unless we banned these chemicals immediately. He said this because “1 in every 3 mouthfuls you’ll eat today,” depends on bee pollination. In short: no bees, no food.

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There's No Wild Bee Colony Collapse Either

General - August 25, 2015 - 12:16pm

In a dramatic 2013 cover story, Time warned of “A World Without Bees,” subtitled “The price we’ll pay if we don’t figure out what’s killing the honeybee.” Its author argued that the class of agricultural pesticides know as neonicotinoids was killing the honeybee and that the planet would starve unless we banned these chemicals immediately. He said this because “1 in every 3 mouthfuls you’ll eat today,” depends on bee pollination. In short: no bees, no food.

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Democrats Have Disavowed Thomas Jefferson - Maybe Washington, D.C. Will Have To Change Its Name Too

Science2.0 - August 25, 2015 - 12:00pm
Democratic parties in four states have recently removed the names of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson from their annual fundraising dinners, a move now under consideration in at least five other states.

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Democrats Have Disavowed Thomas Jefferson - Maybe Washington, D.C. Will Have To Change Its Name Too

General - August 25, 2015 - 12:00pm
Democratic parties in four states have recently removed the names of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson from their annual fundraising dinners, a move now under consideration in at least five other states.

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Categories: News

A Historical Moment For Diabetes

Science2.0 - August 25, 2015 - 11:30am

It has been almost a century since scientists at Eli Lilly figured out how to make large quantities of pure insulin. This historical discovery made it possible for the first time to save the lives of diabetics (mostly children). But now, we are witnessing another breakthrough.

Although perhaps not as dramatic as the development of insulin, for the first time a hypoglycemic drug has been found to increase life expectancy.

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Categories: Science2.0

A Historical Moment For Diabetes

General - August 25, 2015 - 11:30am

It has been almost a century since scientists at Eli Lilly figured out how to make large quantities of pure insulin. This historical discovery made it possible for the first time to save the lives of diabetics (mostly children). But now, we are witnessing another breakthrough.

Although perhaps not as dramatic as the development of insulin, for the first time a hypoglycemic drug has been found to increase life expectancy.

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Categories: News

Say, Where Can We Get A Drink In This Solar System?

Science2.0 - August 25, 2015 - 8:00am
Science fiction movies about aliens threatening the Earth routinely ascribe them the motive of coming here to steal our resources, most often our water.

This is ill thought-out, as water is actually extremely common. Any civilization coming to our solar system in need of water (either to drink or to make rocket fuel) would be foolish to plunge all the way inwards to the Earth, from where they’d have to haul their booty back against the pull of the sun’s gravity.

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Categories: Science2.0

Say, Where Can We Get A Drink In This Solar System?

General - August 25, 2015 - 8:00am
Science fiction movies about aliens threatening the Earth routinely ascribe them the motive of coming here to steal our resources, most often our water.

This is ill thought-out, as water is actually extremely common. Any civilization coming to our solar system in need of water (either to drink or to make rocket fuel) would be foolish to plunge all the way inwards to the Earth, from where they’d have to haul their booty back against the pull of the sun’s gravity.

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Categories: News

Teenagers Are the Worst

RealClearScience - August 25, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

An Iron Bar Makes Decisions

RealClearScience - August 25, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

Sugar Computer Plays Games

RealClearScience - August 25, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

Congress Is Starving NASA

RealClearScience - August 25, 2015 - 6:30am
Categories: RealClearScience

ROI For Biomedical Research Slipping

Science2.0 - August 24, 2015 - 11:49pm

As more money has been spent on biomedical research in the United States over the past 50 years, there has been diminished return on investment in terms of life expectancy gains and new drug approvals, two Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say.

In a report published Aug. 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers found that while the number of scientists has increased more than nine-fold since 1965 and the National Institutes of Health's budget has increased four-fold, the number of new drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration has only increased a little more than two-fold. Meanwhile, life expectancy gains have remained constant at roughly two months per year.


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Categories: Science2.0

ROI For Biomedical Research Slipping

General - August 24, 2015 - 11:49pm

As more money has been spent on biomedical research in the United States over the past 50 years, there has been diminished return on investment in terms of life expectancy gains and new drug approvals, two Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say.

In a report published Aug. 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers found that while the number of scientists has increased more than nine-fold since 1965 and the National Institutes of Health's budget has increased four-fold, the number of new drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration has only increased a little more than two-fold. Meanwhile, life expectancy gains have remained constant at roughly two months per year.


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Categories: News