news aggregator

Study Finds Half of Antibiotic Prescriptions Are Unnecessary

ACSH - May 10, 2017 - 11:34pm

Antibiotic resistance is a crisis. One of the driving forces is that the drugs are overprescribed by primary care physicians. Although there are efforts to minimize the unnecessary antibiotics being given to those who don't need them, a new study shows that they're just not working.

Categories: ACSH

Sequoia, Earth's Most Indestructible Tree, Shows Signs of Drought Damage

ACSH - May 10, 2017 - 5:16pm

The sequoia, the tallest and longest-living tree on Earth, is a wonder of creation. With its massive trunk and staggering verticality, it's difficult not to be awed while in its presence. Adding to that, it is wrapped in fire-resistant bark and it repels damaging insects, making the sequoia virtually indestructible. 

Categories: ACSH

Gray Death: An Opioid With an Apt Name

ACSH - May 10, 2017 - 4:15pm

As if the opioid overdose epidemic in the country isn't bad enough, we have another killer on the streets called "gray death." One of its components is a drug called U-4700, which Upjohn was trying to make into a painkiller decades ago. It never made it to the pharmacy but is now a big hit in the street pharmacy. Worse still, it is so easy to make that a ten-year-old could do it. Scary stuff. 

Categories: ACSH

Money From, I Guess, Big Herpes: What Should I Do With It?

ACSH - May 10, 2017 - 2:40pm

If your only source for news comes from the idiots at Mother Jones or Sourcewatch, you probably don't know much about the real American Council on Science and Health. In that case, you believe their manufactured claims – that we are some kind of sinister group organization – and not that we want to give readers useful information.

Categories: ACSH

Proposal for Physicians to Share Reward and Punishment for Care

ACSH - May 10, 2017 - 1:09pm

The American College of Surgeons recently announced submissions of their plan for attribution of care and physician payment to the Health and Human Services Department’s Planning and Evaluation Office of Health Policy. Let's discuss their approach to attribution, since surgery is a team activity.

Categories: ACSH

5 Great Medical Lessons from Funny Movies

ACSH - May 10, 2017 - 12:03pm

Since we believe laughter is often the best medicine, we didn’t have to look very far to find funny movie scenes that simultaneously delivered meaningful medical lessons.

Categories: ACSH

Practical Tools Of The Improvised Speaker

Science2.0 - May 10, 2017 - 11:54am

Yesterday I visited the Liceo “Benedetti” of Venice, where 40 students are preparing their artwork for a project of communicating science with art that will culminate in an exhibit at the Palazzo del Casinò of the Lido of Venice, during the week of the EPS conference in July.

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Categories: Science2.0

Practical Tools Of The Improvised Speaker

General - May 10, 2017 - 11:54am

Yesterday I visited the Liceo “Benedetti” of Venice, where 40 students are preparing their artwork for a project of communicating science with art that will culminate in an exhibit at the Palazzo del Casinò of the Lido of Venice, during the week of the EPS conference in July.

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Categories: News

Sea Snails and Marine Worms: New Antibiotics Found in Darndest Places

ACSH - May 10, 2017 - 2:39am

When it comes to finding new antibiotics, no place is too weird to look.

Categories: ACSH

Journalists Grieve Death Of Forensic Science Commission

Science2.0 - May 9, 2017 - 7:22pm
The National Commission on Forensic Science was dissolved by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a decisive action that brought an end to a highly decorated body of professionals, but one that was frequently stymied by legal gamesmanship and discord.  The commission, a precipitant of the Obama administration's criminal justice reform efforts, was curiously loaded with trial attorneys, law professors, and other academicians but relatively few forensic scientists.
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Categories: Science2.0

Journalists Grieve Death Of Forensic Science Commission

General - May 9, 2017 - 7:22pm
The National Commission on Forensic Science was dissolved by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a decisive action that brought an end to a highly decorated body of professionals, but one that was frequently stymied by legal gamesmanship and discord.  The commission, a precipitant of the Obama administration's criminal justice reform efforts, was curiously loaded with trial attorneys, law professors, and other academicians but relatively few forensic scientists.
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Categories: News

Sucralose Safety Confirmed Again

ACSH - May 9, 2017 - 4:25pm

Once again, the Ramazini Foundation published a study suggesting that the artificial sweetener sucralose causes cancer —specifically blood cancers — in mice. But a panel from the European Food Safety Authority analyzed that study and found that its conclusions were spurious and in no way should be construed to indict the sweetener. Can we say we told you so?

Categories: ACSH

How Varroa Mites Exploit Beekeeping

Science2.0 - May 9, 2017 - 4:00pm
There has been some ongoing concern about bee colonies, even fears of an impending "colony collapse disorder", but both the fears and the causes have been misplaced, recent studies have shown.

Rather than being a mysterious effect due to pesticides (like neonicotinoids) slight variations in bee populations remain the fault of parasites. Yet that brings its own mystery. Varroa mites, the biggest culprit, are not very mobile. 
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Categories: Science2.0

How Varroa Mites Exploit Beekeeping

General - May 9, 2017 - 4:00pm
There has been some ongoing concern about bee colonies, even fears of an impending "colony collapse disorder", but both the fears and the causes have been misplaced, recent studies have shown.

Rather than being a mysterious effect due to pesticides (like neonicotinoids) slight variations in bee populations remain the fault of parasites. Yet that brings its own mystery. Varroa mites, the biggest culprit, are not very mobile. 
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read more

Categories: News

A Viral Infection May Cause Celiac Disease

ACSH - May 9, 2017 - 2:01pm

Roughly 30-40% of the population has a genetic predisposition to celiac disease. However the amount of people who actually have it is about only 1%. Beyond genetics, what makes this autoimmune disorder affect those in this group? A new study suggests it might be a viral infection – one that often goes unnoticed. 

Categories: ACSH

One Step Closer To Finding The Cause Of Celiac Disease

ACSH - May 9, 2017 - 2:01pm

May is Celiac Disease Awareness month which makes this the perfect time to focus on some exciting new research in the field. 

One of the most interesting questions out there is - what is the cause of celiac disease? 

For some time, the genes responsible for the genetic predisposition of celiac disease have been known - they are called HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8. These two genes are, as geneticists like to say, "required but not sufficient." This means that you need to have them in order to get celiac disease, but, having them is not enough.

Categories: ACSH

Boron is Not Boring

ACSH - May 9, 2017 - 12:38pm

Boron is not a word that comes to mind over small talk. You may have never even uttered the name of a rather uninteresting metal. But some of the chemical compounds that contain boron are very cool. Don't be a boron moron, and give this a look. 

Categories: ACSH

Gary Ruskin, GMO Labeling Movement Funded by Anti-Vaxxers

ACSH - May 9, 2017 - 12:15am

Science writers have long suspected that the anti-GMO movement is linked to the anti-vaccine movement. Indeed, both are predicated upon one of the biggest myths in modern society: "Natural is better."1

Categories: ACSH

Anyone Can Get a Blood Clot

ACSH - May 8, 2017 - 8:30pm

Our innate coagulation – or clotting – cascade is quite a dynamic, but formidable system. When optimally effective, it manages retention of a balanced condition between not too much bleeding and not too much clotting. Let's take a look at how to reduce your chances of developing pathologic clots.

Categories: ACSH

Altering Runners' Glucose Levels, to Avoid 'Hitting the Wall'

ACSH - May 8, 2017 - 7:07pm

Glucose and fat are essential to powering muscles. But glucose is the only energy source that fuels the brain and sustains motivation. Scientists believe that if glucose depletion could be reduced, "hitting the wall" – or for marathoners, giving up – could theoretically be delayed. A recent study examined this glucose-brain connection.

Categories: ACSH