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Older And Younger Adults Surf Different Brain Waves

Science2.0 - February 8, 2016 - 6:53pm

TORONTO, CANADA - Cognitive scientists have found more evidence that aging brains work differently than younger brains when performing the same memory task, pointing to a potentially new direction for age-related cognitive care and exploration.

The study, led by the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences, found that younger and older adults show very different brain wave patterns when performing the same memory task. The study was published online in January in the journal Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.


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Categories: Science2.0

Older And Younger Adults Surf Different Brain Waves

General - February 8, 2016 - 6:53pm

TORONTO, CANADA - Cognitive scientists have found more evidence that aging brains work differently than younger brains when performing the same memory task, pointing to a potentially new direction for age-related cognitive care and exploration.

The study, led by the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences, found that younger and older adults show very different brain wave patterns when performing the same memory task. The study was published online in January in the journal Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.


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Categories: News

Here’s Why Surge in Hepatitis B Cases is No Surprise

ACSH - February 8, 2016 - 6:34pm

There's been a sharp uptick in the number of hepatitis B cases in the U.S. This isn't unexpected, because since 2010 heroin use has skyrocketed, and with that use, needles are shared more frequently. We're recently seen HIV and Hep C outbreaks from needle sharing. Is this any different? Very unlikely. Continue reading →

The post Here’s Why Surge in Hepatitis B Cases is No Surprise appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

Categories: ACSH

Whooping Cough Booster Declines Rapidly Over 4 Years

ACSH - February 8, 2016 - 6:19pm

A new study shows the rapid loss of protection against whooping cough among teens vaccinated with a booster shot. This decline, which takes place over less than four years, helps explain the recent outbreaks in California and Minnesota, and shows that a new vaccination approach is needed. Continue reading →

The post Whooping Cough Booster Declines Rapidly Over 4 Years appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

Categories: ACSH

Unapproved Stem Cell Therapies, a Public Health Menace

ACSH - February 8, 2016 - 5:28pm

The Food and Drug Administration recently issued draft guidelines for the regulation of stem cell therapy clinics. They have become part of a booming industry, with many of them run by those with the ethical makeup of snake oil salesmen of yesteryear. Continue reading →

The post Unapproved Stem Cell Therapies, a Public Health Menace appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

Categories: ACSH

Enjoying the Sun’s Vitamin D, While Blocking Skin Cancer

ACSH - February 8, 2016 - 4:33pm

Current medical advice says avoid the sun to minimize the risk of skin cancers, but doing so also minimizes the production of vitamin D by the skin. New research may be finding a way to both avoid skin cancers, while allowing the sun to promote vitamin D production. Continue reading →

The post Enjoying the Sun’s Vitamin D, While Blocking Skin Cancer appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

Categories: ACSH

Ocean Acidification Makes Coralline Algae Less Robust

Science2.0 - February 8, 2016 - 3:09pm

Ocean acidification (the ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth's oceans, caused by the uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere), is affecting the formation of the skeleton of coralline algae which play an important part in marine biodiversity, new research from the University of Bristol, UK has found.

Coralline red algae form maerl beds which provide important habitat in shallow waters, including the UK coastal shelf. Maerl hosts a high diversity of organisms by providing habitats, shelter and nursery areas for, amongst others, fish larvae and young scallops. Both coralline algae and the maerl beds they generate are protected by national and international regulation as they form biodiversity hotspots and support fisheries.


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Categories: Science2.0

Ocean Acidification Makes Coralline Algae Less Robust

General - February 8, 2016 - 3:09pm

Ocean acidification (the ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth's oceans, caused by the uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere), is affecting the formation of the skeleton of coralline algae which play an important part in marine biodiversity, new research from the University of Bristol, UK has found.

Coralline red algae form maerl beds which provide important habitat in shallow waters, including the UK coastal shelf. Maerl hosts a high diversity of organisms by providing habitats, shelter and nursery areas for, amongst others, fish larvae and young scallops. Both coralline algae and the maerl beds they generate are protected by national and international regulation as they form biodiversity hotspots and support fisheries.


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Categories: News

Early Human Ancestor Did Not Have The Jaws Of A Nutcracker

Science2.0 - February 8, 2016 - 3:09pm

South Africa's Australopithecus sediba, discovered in 2008 at the renowned archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, is again helping us to study and understand the origins of humans.

Research published in 2012 garnered international attention by suggesting that this possible early human ancestor had lived on a diverse woodland diet including hard foods mixed in with tree bark, fruit, leaves and other plant products.


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Categories: Science2.0

Early Human Ancestor Did Not Have The Jaws Of A Nutcracker

General - February 8, 2016 - 3:09pm

South Africa's Australopithecus sediba, discovered in 2008 at the renowned archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, is again helping us to study and understand the origins of humans.

Research published in 2012 garnered international attention by suggesting that this possible early human ancestor had lived on a diverse woodland diet including hard foods mixed in with tree bark, fruit, leaves and other plant products.


read more

Categories: News

Why Your Muscles Get Less Sore As You Stick With Your Gym Routine

Science2.0 - February 8, 2016 - 3:09pm

The first time back to the gym after a long break usually results in sore muscles. Fortunately, the return trip a few days later--if it happens--is generally less painful.

Scientists have studied this reduced-soreness phenomenon for decades and even have a name for it--the repeated bout effect. Despite all those years of research, they still can't figure out exactly why people feel less sore the second time around.

What they do know is the immune system plays some role in how the muscle repairs itself and protects against additional damage. But now exercise science researchers at BYU have produced evidence that shows for the first time the surprising presence of very specific immune workers: T-cells.


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Categories: Science2.0

Why Your Muscles Get Less Sore As You Stick With Your Gym Routine

General - February 8, 2016 - 3:09pm

The first time back to the gym after a long break usually results in sore muscles. Fortunately, the return trip a few days later--if it happens--is generally less painful.

Scientists have studied this reduced-soreness phenomenon for decades and even have a name for it--the repeated bout effect. Despite all those years of research, they still can't figure out exactly why people feel less sore the second time around.

What they do know is the immune system plays some role in how the muscle repairs itself and protects against additional damage. But now exercise science researchers at BYU have produced evidence that shows for the first time the surprising presence of very specific immune workers: T-cells.


read more

Categories: News

Norovirus: From Satan’s Biohazard Lab To Your Duodenum

ACSH - February 8, 2016 - 1:00pm

Viruses are all over the news right now. Here's one that is *bad* news—norovirus. What's it going to do to you? How do you catch it? Walt "Clyde" Frazier explains. Continue reading →

The post Norovirus: From Satan’s Biohazard Lab To Your Duodenum appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

Categories: ACSH

Health Briefs: What You Missed Over the Weekend

ACSH - February 8, 2016 - 12:29pm

Some of the top health stories making news over the last 48 hours. Continue reading →

The post Health Briefs: What You Missed Over the Weekend appeared first on American Council on Science and Health.

Categories: ACSH

From The Great Wall To The Great Collider

Science2.0 - February 8, 2016 - 10:55am
With a long delay, last week I was finally able to have a look at the book "From the Great Wall to the Great Collider - China and the Quest to Uncover the Inner Workings of the Universe", by Steve Nadis and Shing-Tung Yau. And I would like to report about my impressions here.
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Categories: Science2.0

From The Great Wall To The Great Collider

General - February 8, 2016 - 10:55am
With a long delay, last week I was finally able to have a look at the book "From the Great Wall to the Great Collider - China and the Quest to Uncover the Inner Workings of the Universe", by Steve Nadis and Shing-Tung Yau. And I would like to report about my impressions here.
-->

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Categories: News

Increase In Volcanic Eruptions At The End Of The Ice Age Caused By Melting Ice Caps And Erosion

Science2.0 - February 8, 2016 - 6:26am

The combination of erosion and melting ice caps led to a massive increase in volcanic activity at the end of the last ice age, according to new research. As the climate warmed, the ice caps melted, decreasing the pressure on the Earth's mantle, leading to an increase in both magma production and volcanic eruptions. The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, have found that erosion also played a major role in the process, and may have contributed to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.


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Categories: Science2.0

Increase In Volcanic Eruptions At The End Of The Ice Age Caused By Melting Ice Caps And Erosion

General - February 8, 2016 - 6:26am

The combination of erosion and melting ice caps led to a massive increase in volcanic activity at the end of the last ice age, according to new research. As the climate warmed, the ice caps melted, decreasing the pressure on the Earth's mantle, leading to an increase in both magma production and volcanic eruptions. The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, have found that erosion also played a major role in the process, and may have contributed to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.


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Categories: News

Can Animals Thrive Without Oxygen?

Science2.0 - February 8, 2016 - 6:26am

In 2010, a research team garnered attention when it published evidence of finding the first animals living in permanently anoxic conditions at the bottom of the sea. But a new study, led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), raises doubts.

One alternative scenario is that cadavers of multicellular organisms were inhabited by bacteria capable of living in anoxic conditions, and these "bodysnatchers" made it seem that the dead animals were living, said Joan Bernhard, a geobiologist with WHOI and the lead author of the new study published in the December 2015 issue of the scientific journal BMC Biology.


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Categories: Science2.0

Can Animals Thrive Without Oxygen?

General - February 8, 2016 - 6:26am

In 2010, a research team garnered attention when it published evidence of finding the first animals living in permanently anoxic conditions at the bottom of the sea. But a new study, led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), raises doubts.

One alternative scenario is that cadavers of multicellular organisms were inhabited by bacteria capable of living in anoxic conditions, and these "bodysnatchers" made it seem that the dead animals were living, said Joan Bernhard, a geobiologist with WHOI and the lead author of the new study published in the December 2015 issue of the scientific journal BMC Biology.


read more

Categories: News