news aggregator

Proton-Proton Fusion: Looking Into The Heart Of The Sun

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 5:31pm

Using the Borexino instrument, located deep beneath Italy's Apennine Mountains and one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists has directly detected neutrinos created by the "keystone" proton-proton (pp) fusion process going on at the sun's core. 

The pp reaction is the first step of a reaction sequence responsible for about 99 percent of the Sun's power. Solar neutrinos are produced in nuclear processes and radioactive decays of different elements during fusion reactions at the Sun's core. These particles stream out of the star at nearly the speed of light, as many as 420 billion hitting every square inch of the Earth's surface per second. 


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Proton-Proton Fusion: Looking Into The Heart Of The Sun

General - August 29, 2014 - 5:31pm

Using the Borexino instrument, located deep beneath Italy's Apennine Mountains and one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists has directly detected neutrinos created by the "keystone" proton-proton (pp) fusion process going on at the sun's core. 

The pp reaction is the first step of a reaction sequence responsible for about 99 percent of the Sun's power. Solar neutrinos are produced in nuclear processes and radioactive decays of different elements during fusion reactions at the Sun's core. These particles stream out of the star at nearly the speed of light, as many as 420 billion hitting every square inch of the Earth's surface per second. 


read more

Categories: News

Why Replacing Teachers With Automated Education Lacks Imagination

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 5:07pm

By George Veletsianos, Royal Roads University

The belief that technology can automate education and replace teachers is pervasive. Framed in calls for greater efficiency, this belief is present in today’s educational innovations, reform endeavors, and technology products. We can do better than adopting this insipid perspective and aspire instead for a better future where innovations imagine creative new ways to organize education.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Why Replacing Teachers With Automated Education Lacks Imagination

General - August 29, 2014 - 5:07pm

By George Veletsianos, Royal Roads University

The belief that technology can automate education and replace teachers is pervasive. Framed in calls for greater efficiency, this belief is present in today’s educational innovations, reform endeavors, and technology products. We can do better than adopting this insipid perspective and aspire instead for a better future where innovations imagine creative new ways to organize education.

-->

read more

Categories: News

How Wild Rabbits Genetically Became Tame Ones

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 4:39pm

Why wild animals genetically changed into domesticated forms has long been a mystery, covered by the blanket artificial selection reasoning.

A new paper in Science says that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication. 


read more

Categories: Science2.0

How Wild Rabbits Genetically Became Tame Ones

General - August 29, 2014 - 4:39pm

Why wild animals genetically changed into domesticated forms has long been a mystery, covered by the blanket artificial selection reasoning.

A new paper in Science says that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication. 


read more

Categories: News

Studying Prefrontal Lobe Damage Unlocks Brain Mysteries

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 2:48pm

Until the last few decades, the frontal lobes of the brain were shrouded in mystery and erroneously thought of as nonessential for normal function—hence the frequent use of lobotomies in the early 20th century to treat psychiatric disorders. A review in Neuron highlights studies of patients with brain damage that reveal how distinct areas of the frontal lobes are critical for a person's ability to learn, multitask, control their emotions, socialize, and make real-life decisions. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Studying Prefrontal Lobe Damage Unlocks Brain Mysteries

General - August 29, 2014 - 2:48pm

Until the last few decades, the frontal lobes of the brain were shrouded in mystery and erroneously thought of as nonessential for normal function—hence the frequent use of lobotomies in the early 20th century to treat psychiatric disorders. A review in Neuron highlights studies of patients with brain damage that reveal how distinct areas of the frontal lobes are critical for a person's ability to learn, multitask, control their emotions, socialize, and make real-life decisions. 


-->

read more

Categories: News

Junk Food Rats Ditch Balanced Diet To Eat Just Like Obese People

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 2:22pm


Supersize me: buffet edition. Joanna Servaes, CC BY-NC

By Aaron Blaisdell, University of California, Los Angeles

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Junk Food Rats Ditch Balanced Diet To Eat Just Like Obese People

General - August 29, 2014 - 2:22pm


Supersize me: buffet edition. Joanna Servaes, CC BY-NC

By Aaron Blaisdell, University of California, Los Angeles

-->

read more

Categories: News

3 Papers Discuss The Molecular Toolkits We Share With Flies And Worms

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 2:14pm

Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of gene expression and it's all in our genomic data.

Three related studies in Nature, tell a similar story: even though humans, worms, and flies bear little obvious similarity to each other, evolution used remarkably similar molecular toolkits to shape them.

There are dramatic differences between species in genomic regions populated by pseudogenes, molecular fossils of working genes, according to Yale authors in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

3 Papers Discuss The Molecular Toolkits We Share With Flies And Worms

General - August 29, 2014 - 2:14pm

Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of gene expression and it's all in our genomic data.

Three related studies in Nature, tell a similar story: even though humans, worms, and flies bear little obvious similarity to each other, evolution used remarkably similar molecular toolkits to shape them.

There are dramatic differences between species in genomic regions populated by pseudogenes, molecular fossils of working genes, according to Yale authors in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


read more

Categories: News

Learning New Skills: It's All About Flexing The Brain

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 2:05pm

Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to an ability we already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve.

Scientists from the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC) have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why this happens. Writing in Nature, they say that there are limitations on how adaptable the brain is during learning and that these restrictions are a key determinant for whether a new skill will be easy or difficult to learn. Understanding the ways in which the brain's activity can be "flexed" during learning could eventually be used to develop better treatments for stroke and other brain injuries.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Learning New Skills: It's All About Flexing The Brain

General - August 29, 2014 - 2:05pm

Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to an ability we already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve.

Scientists from the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC) have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why this happens. Writing in Nature, they say that there are limitations on how adaptable the brain is during learning and that these restrictions are a key determinant for whether a new skill will be easy or difficult to learn. Understanding the ways in which the brain's activity can be "flexed" during learning could eventually be used to develop better treatments for stroke and other brain injuries.


read more

Categories: News

The Lunar Aroma

RealClearScience - August 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

What the Cured Blind See

RealClearScience - August 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

3 Facts About Your Face Mites

RealClearScience - August 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

Take the Crackpot Test

RealClearScience - August 29, 2014 - 5:00am
Categories: RealClearScience

Anger Face Is Universal, And It Evolved Because Of Psychology

Science2.0 - August 29, 2014 - 3:00am

The next time you get really mad, take a look in the mirror. See that lowered brow, the thinned lips and the flared nostrils? That's what social scientists call the "anger face," and they believe it is part of our basic biology as humans.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Anger Face Is Universal, And It Evolved Because Of Psychology

General - August 29, 2014 - 3:00am

The next time you get really mad, take a look in the mirror. See that lowered brow, the thinned lips and the flared nostrils? That's what social scientists call the "anger face," and they believe it is part of our basic biology as humans.


-->

read more

Categories: News