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Xi_b: LHC Discovers Two New Particles In The Baryon Family!

General - November 19, 2014 - 8:22pm

The LHCb experiment collaborators at the Large Hadron Collider have announced discovery of two new particles in the baryon family.

The particles, known as the Xi_b'- and Xi_b*-, were predicted to exist by the quark model but had never been seen before. A related particle, the Xi_b*0, was found by the CMS experiment at CERN in 2012. 

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Xi_b: LHC Discovers Two New Particles In The Baryon Family!

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 8:22pm

The LHCb experiment collaborators at the Large Hadron Collider have announced discovery of two new particles in the baryon family.

The particles, known as the Xi_b'- and Xi_b*-, were predicted to exist by the quark model but had never been seen before. A related particle, the Xi_b*0, was found by the CMS experiment at CERN in 2012. 

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Bacterial 'Bio Batteries' Get A Step Closer

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 7:07pm

Bacteria are everywhere and so efforts to make cleaner energy using them are ongoing.

A report today shows how electrons hop across otherwise electrically insulated areas of bacterial proteins, and that the rate of electrical transfer is dependent on the orientation and proximity of these electrically conductive 'stepping stones'. It is hoped that this natural process can be used to create viable 'bio batteries' which could produce energy for portable technology such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops - powered by human or animal waste. So using your tablet on the toilet would then make even more sense.


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Categories: Science2.0

Bacterial 'Bio Batteries' Get A Step Closer

General - November 19, 2014 - 7:07pm

Bacteria are everywhere and so efforts to make cleaner energy using them are ongoing.

A report today shows how electrons hop across otherwise electrically insulated areas of bacterial proteins, and that the rate of electrical transfer is dependent on the orientation and proximity of these electrically conductive 'stepping stones'. It is hoped that this natural process can be used to create viable 'bio batteries' which could produce energy for portable technology such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops - powered by human or animal waste. So using your tablet on the toilet would then make even more sense.


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Sorry Kids, Men Are Better Writers Than Women

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 5:41pm

Oh, no, wait – it's the 21st century! Carl Guderian

By Camilla Nelson, University of Notre Dame Australia

It’s official: men are better writers than women.

The news came as something of a shock to a hardened feminist such as myself, but a quick survey of prescribed and suggested texts set for senior English in most Australian states demonstrates this is a fact routinely taught to teenagers in school.

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Sorry Kids, Men Are Better Writers Than Women

General - November 19, 2014 - 5:41pm

Oh, no, wait – it's the 21st century! Carl Guderian

By Camilla Nelson, University of Notre Dame Australia

It’s official: men are better writers than women.

The news came as something of a shock to a hardened feminist such as myself, but a quick survey of prescribed and suggested texts set for senior English in most Australian states demonstrates this is a fact routinely taught to teenagers in school.

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Jelly Takeover: Loss Of Calcium In Lakes Is Shaping Evolution

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 5:39pm

Historical acid deposits have greatly reduced calcium levels in Canadian lakes and that is dramatically impacting populations of calcium-rich plankton such as Daphnia - water fleas that dominate these ecosystems. 


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Jelly Takeover: Loss Of Calcium In Lakes Is Shaping Evolution

General - November 19, 2014 - 5:39pm

Historical acid deposits have greatly reduced calcium levels in Canadian lakes and that is dramatically impacting populations of calcium-rich plankton such as Daphnia - water fleas that dominate these ecosystems. 


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Older Brains Retain Plasticity, Just In A Different Place

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 4:59pm

It is commonly believed that one key issue in brain again is that it becomes less flexible - plastic - and that learning may therefore become more difficult.

A new study contradicts that and shows that plasticity did occur in seniors who learned a task well, it just occurred in a different part of the brain than in younger people.

When many older subjects learned a new visual task, the researchers found, they unexpectedly showed a significantly associated change in the white matter of the brain. White matter is the the brain's "wiring," or axons, sheathed in a material called myelin that can make transmission of signals more efficient. Younger learners, meanwhile, showed plasticity in the cortex, where neuroscientists expected to see it.


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Categories: Science2.0

Older Brains Retain Plasticity, Just In A Different Place

General - November 19, 2014 - 4:59pm

It is commonly believed that one key issue in brain again is that it becomes less flexible - plastic - and that learning may therefore become more difficult.

A new study contradicts that and shows that plasticity did occur in seniors who learned a task well, it just occurred in a different part of the brain than in younger people.

When many older subjects learned a new visual task, the researchers found, they unexpectedly showed a significantly associated change in the white matter of the brain. White matter is the the brain's "wiring," or axons, sheathed in a material called myelin that can make transmission of signals more efficient. Younger learners, meanwhile, showed plasticity in the cortex, where neuroscientists expected to see it.


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Seed Dormancy Existed 360 Million Years Ago

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 4:52pm

Scientists have found that seed dormancy, a property that prevents germination when conditions are not right, was present in the first seeds 360 million years ago.

Seed dormancy is a phenomenon that has intrigued naturalists for decades, since it conditions the dynamics of natural vegetation and agricultural cycles. There are several types of dormancy, and some of them are modulated by environmental conditions in more subtle ways than others.

In an article published in the New Phytologist journal, the scientists studied the evolution of dormancy in seeds using more than 14.000 species. 


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Seed Dormancy Existed 360 Million Years Ago

General - November 19, 2014 - 4:52pm

Scientists have found that seed dormancy, a property that prevents germination when conditions are not right, was present in the first seeds 360 million years ago.

Seed dormancy is a phenomenon that has intrigued naturalists for decades, since it conditions the dynamics of natural vegetation and agricultural cycles. There are several types of dormancy, and some of them are modulated by environmental conditions in more subtle ways than others.

In an article published in the New Phytologist journal, the scientists studied the evolution of dormancy in seeds using more than 14.000 species. 


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Gamburtsev: The Fountain Of Youth Under The Antarctic Mountains

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 4:46pm

Time is relative. What is a long time to humans is nothing to a mountain. Like humans, mountains usually burst on the scene, then they stand tall and finally age wears them down and their sharp features soften and they become grow shorter and rounder.

Not all mountains, though. The Gamburtsev Mountains in the middle of Antarctica look quite young for their age. Though the Gamburtsevs were discovered in the 1950s, they remained unexplored until government budget increases and few things left above ground to explore led scientists to fly ice-penetrating instruments over the mountains 60 years later.


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Categories: Science2.0

Gamburtsev: The Fountain Of Youth Under The Antarctic Mountains

General - November 19, 2014 - 4:46pm

Time is relative. What is a long time to humans is nothing to a mountain. Like humans, mountains usually burst on the scene, then they stand tall and finally age wears them down and their sharp features soften and they become grow shorter and rounder.

Not all mountains, though. The Gamburtsev Mountains in the middle of Antarctica look quite young for their age. Though the Gamburtsevs were discovered in the 1950s, they remained unexplored until government budget increases and few things left above ground to explore led scientists to fly ice-penetrating instruments over the mountains 60 years later.


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Want A Man To Help? High Heels Work

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 4:21pm

Following a woman in high heels up out of the subway is like discovering America. Following a woman in flip-flops up out of the subway is like riding the subway. - Rich Brookhiser

Women judge men by their shoes, that is no secret. Women colloquially say that they know how a man will treat them based on how much he cares about his footwear and (bonus tell: how he treats the waitress in a restaurant).


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Categories: Science2.0

Want A Man To Help? High Heels Work

General - November 19, 2014 - 4:21pm

Following a woman in high heels up out of the subway is like discovering America. Following a woman in flip-flops up out of the subway is like riding the subway. - Rich Brookhiser

Women judge men by their shoes, that is no secret. Women colloquially say that they know how a man will treat them based on how much he cares about his footwear and (bonus tell: how he treats the waitress in a restaurant).


read more

Categories: News

Microwave Electron Guns: A Field-Emission Plug-And-Play Solution

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 2:30pm

On a quest to design an alternative to the complex approaches currently used to produce electrons within microwave electron guns, a team of researchers have demonstrated a plug-and-play solution capable of operating in a high-electric-field environment with a high-quality electron beam.

Unfamiliar with microwave electron guns? They provide a higher current and much higher quality electron beams than conventional DC guns for X-ray sources . Beams of this sort are also used in free-electron lasers, synchrotrons, linear colliders and wakefield accelerator schemes. But the electron emission mechanisms involved -- laser irradiation of materials (photocathodes) and heating of materials (thermionic cathodes) -- tend to be complex, bulky or extremely expensive.


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Categories: Science2.0

Microwave Electron Guns: A Field-Emission Plug-And-Play Solution

General - November 19, 2014 - 2:30pm

On a quest to design an alternative to the complex approaches currently used to produce electrons within microwave electron guns, a team of researchers have demonstrated a plug-and-play solution capable of operating in a high-electric-field environment with a high-quality electron beam.

Unfamiliar with microwave electron guns? They provide a higher current and much higher quality electron beams than conventional DC guns for X-ray sources . Beams of this sort are also used in free-electron lasers, synchrotrons, linear colliders and wakefield accelerator schemes. But the electron emission mechanisms involved -- laser irradiation of materials (photocathodes) and heating of materials (thermionic cathodes) -- tend to be complex, bulky or extremely expensive.


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The Whip, The Lash And The Blood, Sweat And Semen Of Jazz

Science2.0 - November 19, 2014 - 2:00pm

Dr. Fletcher (J.K. Simmons) and Andrew (Miles Teller) in Whiplash

By Lauren Rosewarne, University of Melbourne

A decade of piano lessons with a woman who never allowed my lack of passion, prowess or practice ruin a good thing, exists as a mere red herring.

A good woman, a sane woman, but even ten years with her wasn’t enough to ameliorate the (mis)education I got from music classes in primary school.

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Categories: Science2.0

The Whip, The Lash And The Blood, Sweat And Semen Of Jazz

General - November 19, 2014 - 2:00pm

Dr. Fletcher (J.K. Simmons) and Andrew (Miles Teller) in Whiplash

By Lauren Rosewarne, University of Melbourne

A decade of piano lessons with a woman who never allowed my lack of passion, prowess or practice ruin a good thing, exists as a mere red herring.

A good woman, a sane woman, but even ten years with her wasn’t enough to ameliorate the (mis)education I got from music classes in primary school.

-->

read more

Categories: News