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The $60 Billion Question -- Can We Prevent Norovirus?

General - April 26, 2016 - 8:31pm

Each year, norovirus causes over 200,000 deaths and a global economic burden of $60 billion. A highly contagious virus that most people will contract 5 times in their lifetime, the most serious outcomes of the disease - hospitalization and death - are far more common among children and the elderly, and in low and middle income countries. In a new PLOS Collection - "The Global Burden of Norovirus & Prospects for Vaccine Development" - global norovirus experts fill critical knowledge gaps and provide key information to further development of a much-needed vaccine.

Insights from the collection


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Categories: News

Researchers Find Brain Circuit That Controls Binge Drinking

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 8:31pm

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have identified a circuit between two brain regions that controls alcohol binge drinking, offering a more complete picture on what drives a behavior that costs the United States more than $170 billion annually and how it can be treated.


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Categories: Science2.0

Researchers Find Brain Circuit That Controls Binge Drinking

General - April 26, 2016 - 8:31pm

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have identified a circuit between two brain regions that controls alcohol binge drinking, offering a more complete picture on what drives a behavior that costs the United States more than $170 billion annually and how it can be treated.


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Categories: News

A Novel Approach to Treating Sepsis

ACSH - April 26, 2016 - 7:16pm
Scientists from South Korea have developed a novel method for treating sepsis, one which does not focus on the infection. Rather it's aimed at maintaining the functional and structural integrity of blood vessels. Continue reading →
Categories: ACSH

Matter Can Potentially Accelerate The Expansion Of The Universe

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 7:16pm
How well established are current cosmological dogmas? What do we really know about the fundamental origin and dynamics of our Universe, in spite of the remarkable work accomplished by COBE, WMAP, Planck and other collaborations? Actually, we know little or nothing about many basic questions. In particular, the structure and dynamics of the physical vacuum remain by now totally unknown. As a consequence, we are unable to describe the process by which the cosmological vacuum expands following the expansion of space. -->

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Categories: Science2.0

Matter Can Potentially Accelerate The Expansion Of The Universe

General - April 26, 2016 - 7:16pm
How well established are current cosmological dogmas? What do we really know about the fundamental origin and dynamics of our Universe, in spite of the remarkable work accomplished by COBE, WMAP, Planck and other collaborations? Actually, we know little or nothing about many basic questions. In particular, the structure and dynamics of the physical vacuum remain by now totally unknown. As a consequence, we are unable to describe the process by which the cosmological vacuum expands following the expansion of space. -->

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Categories: News

Britiots Substitute Vinegar for Glyphosate

ACSH - April 26, 2016 - 6:41pm
The geniuses who run the city of Bristol in the United Kingdom decided that glyphosate was SO dangerous that they were going to try a one-year program during which it would switch to vinegar as an "organic" weed killer. How's that working out? According to the residents of Bristol, the whole idea, quite literally, stinks. Continue reading →
Categories: ACSH

Abnormal Blood Flow Indicates Traumatic Brain Injury in Football Players

ACSH - April 26, 2016 - 4:59pm
Before concussions can be treated it's best to understand what is really happening in the brain, and the authors of a study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease claim to have made some progress. Continue reading →
Categories: ACSH

Abnormally Low Blood Flow Indicates Damage To NFL Players' Brains

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

The discovery of brain pathology through autopsy in former National Football League (NFL) players called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has raised substantial concern among players, medical professionals, and the general public about the impact of repetitive head trauma. Using sophisticated neuroimaging and analytics, researchers have now identified abnormal areas of low blood flow in living professional football players. These findings, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, raises the potential for better diagnosis and treatment for persons with football related head trauma.


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Categories: Science2.0

Abnormally Low Blood Flow Indicates Damage To NFL Players' Brains

General - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

The discovery of brain pathology through autopsy in former National Football League (NFL) players called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has raised substantial concern among players, medical professionals, and the general public about the impact of repetitive head trauma. Using sophisticated neuroimaging and analytics, researchers have now identified abnormal areas of low blood flow in living professional football players. These findings, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, raises the potential for better diagnosis and treatment for persons with football related head trauma.


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Categories: News

Citizen Scientists Collected Rare Ice Data, Confirm Warming Since Industrial Revolution

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

TORONTO, April 26, 2016 - In 1442, Shinto priests in Japan began keeping records of the freeze dates of a nearby lake, while in 1693 Finnish merchants started recording breakup dates on a local river. Together they create the oldest inland water ice records in human history and mark the first inklings of climate change, says a new report published today out of York University and the University of Wisconsin.

The researchers say the meticulous recordkeeping of these historical "citizen scientists" reveals increasing trends towards later ice-cover formation and earlier spring thaw since the start of the Industrial Revolution.


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Categories: Science2.0

Citizen Scientists Collected Rare Ice Data, Confirm Warming Since Industrial Revolution

General - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

TORONTO, April 26, 2016 - In 1442, Shinto priests in Japan began keeping records of the freeze dates of a nearby lake, while in 1693 Finnish merchants started recording breakup dates on a local river. Together they create the oldest inland water ice records in human history and mark the first inklings of climate change, says a new report published today out of York University and the University of Wisconsin.

The researchers say the meticulous recordkeeping of these historical "citizen scientists" reveals increasing trends towards later ice-cover formation and earlier spring thaw since the start of the Industrial Revolution.


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Categories: News

Does Learning Improve When Every Student Gets A Laptop?

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Schools that provide each student with a laptop computer, as well as the appropriate support for both students and teachers, see significant improvement in academic achievement, a new paper indicates.

Michigan State University's Binbin Zheng and colleagues analyzed years of studies on "one-to-one" laptop programs, including Zheng's own research, and found that such programs that take a comprehensive approach were linked to higher test scores in English, math, science and writing, along with other benefits.


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Categories: Science2.0

Does Learning Improve When Every Student Gets A Laptop?

General - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Schools that provide each student with a laptop computer, as well as the appropriate support for both students and teachers, see significant improvement in academic achievement, a new paper indicates.

Michigan State University's Binbin Zheng and colleagues analyzed years of studies on "one-to-one" laptop programs, including Zheng's own research, and found that such programs that take a comprehensive approach were linked to higher test scores in English, math, science and writing, along with other benefits.


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Categories: News

Despite Their Small Brains -- Ravens Are Just As Clever As Chimps

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows that ravens are as clever as chimpanzees, despite having much smaller brains, indicating that rather than the size of the brain, the neuronal density and the structure of the birds' brains play an important role in terms of their intelligence.

"Absolute brain size is not the whole story. We found that corvid birds performed as well as great apes, despite having much smaller brains", says Can Kabadayi, doctoral student in Cognitive Science.


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Categories: Science2.0

Despite Their Small Brains -- Ravens Are Just As Clever As Chimps

General - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows that ravens are as clever as chimpanzees, despite having much smaller brains, indicating that rather than the size of the brain, the neuronal density and the structure of the birds' brains play an important role in terms of their intelligence.

"Absolute brain size is not the whole story. We found that corvid birds performed as well as great apes, despite having much smaller brains", says Can Kabadayi, doctoral student in Cognitive Science.


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Categories: News

Caution Advised In Over-regulating E-cigarettes As Alternative To Smoking Tobacco

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

Seven international tobacco control experts urged government regulators to avoid heavy-handed condemnation of e-cigarette use, in a study published online today in the journal Addiction.

The researchers noted that regulations of e-cigarettes are clearly needed, but that governments need to weigh growing evidence of the benefits e-cigarettes provide in helping some addicted cigarette smokers quit against the potential for harm if non-smokers take up vaping, the term commonly used to describe use of e-cigarettes.


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Categories: Science2.0

Caution Advised In Over-regulating E-cigarettes As Alternative To Smoking Tobacco

General - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

Seven international tobacco control experts urged government regulators to avoid heavy-handed condemnation of e-cigarette use, in a study published online today in the journal Addiction.

The researchers noted that regulations of e-cigarettes are clearly needed, but that governments need to weigh growing evidence of the benefits e-cigarettes provide in helping some addicted cigarette smokers quit against the potential for harm if non-smokers take up vaping, the term commonly used to describe use of e-cigarettes.


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Categories: News

Bioreactors Ready For The Big Time

Science2.0 - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

URBANA, Ill. - Last summer, the Gulf of Mexico's "dead zone" spanned more than 6,400 square miles, more than three times the size it should have been, according to the Gulf Hypoxia Task Force. Nitrogen runoff from farms along the Mississippi River winds up in the Gulf, feeding algae but depriving other marine life of oxygen when the algae decomposes. The 12 states that border the Mississippi have been mandated to develop nutrient reduction strategies, but one especially effective strategy has not been adopted widely: bioreactors.


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Categories: Science2.0

Bioreactors Ready For The Big Time

General - April 26, 2016 - 4:43pm

URBANA, Ill. - Last summer, the Gulf of Mexico's "dead zone" spanned more than 6,400 square miles, more than three times the size it should have been, according to the Gulf Hypoxia Task Force. Nitrogen runoff from farms along the Mississippi River winds up in the Gulf, feeding algae but depriving other marine life of oxygen when the algae decomposes. The 12 states that border the Mississippi have been mandated to develop nutrient reduction strategies, but one especially effective strategy has not been adopted widely: bioreactors.


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Categories: News