Content

Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMR

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) - the relaxing 'brain tingles' experienced by some people in response to specific triggers, such as whispering, tapping and slow hand movements -- may have benefits for both mental and physical health, according to new research.
Categories: Content

Hitchhiking to kill

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
How can elimination of therapeutics from the bloodstream or their early enzymatic degradation be avoided in systemic delivery? Chinese scientists have new developed a method to bind an established cancer therapeutic, floxuridine, with natural serum albumin for its transport and delivery to target cancer cells. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the authors demonstrate the automated synthesis of a conjugated floxuridine polymer, its successful transport and delivery, and its efficiency in stopping tumor growth.
Categories: Content

Scientists print sensors on gummi candy

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.
Categories: Content

Improved CPR training could save more lives, research finds

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
This Scientific Statement addresses gaps in resuscitation training that lead to flat survival rates for cardiac arrest victims. Standardized online and in-person courses are falling short and not always implemented to optimize retention and mastery. The statement examines best practices in education and applies the learning in new resuscitation science, offering suggestions for improvement in training on eight key elements.
Categories: Content

Alzheimer's breakthrough: Brain metals that may drive disease progression revealed

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Alzheimer's disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegenerative condition, by an international research collaboration including the University of Warwick.
Categories: Content

Garden seed diet for threatened turtle doves has negative impact

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
New research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has found that young turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds foraged from non-cultivated arable plants rather than food provided in people's gardens are more likely to survive after fledging. Ecologists at the University of Lincoln, UK, investigated the dietary habits of European turtle doves using DNA analysis of faecal samples and found significant associations between the body condition and the source of the bird's diet.
Categories: Content

Bisexual men have higher risk for heart disease

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Bisexual men have a higher risk for heart disease compared with heterosexual men across several modifiable risk factors, finds a new study published online in the journal LGBT Health.
Categories: Content

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older women

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
For the first time in the world, researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have demonstrated that probiotics, dietary supplements with health-promoting bacteria, can be used to affect the human skeleton. Among older women who received probiotics, bone loss was halved compared to women who received only a placebo. The research opens the door to a new way to prevent fractures among the elderly.
Categories: Content

When fluid flows almost as fast as light -- with quantum rotation

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Quark-gluon plasma is formed as a result of high energy collisions of heavy ions. After a collision, for a dozen or so yoctoseconds this most perfect of all known fluids undergoes rapid hydrodynamic expansion with velocities close to the velocity of light. Scientists, associated with the IFJ PAN and the GSI, has presented a new model describing these extreme flows. For the first time effects resulting from the fact that the particles creating the plasma carry spin, are taken into account.
Categories: Content

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite film

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a graphene assembled film that has over 60 percent higher thermal conductivity than graphite film -- despite the fact that graphite simply consists of many layers of graphene. The graphene film shows great potential as a novel heat spreading material for form-factor driven electronics and other high power-driven systems.
Categories: Content

Fat cells control fat cell growth

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Researchers from ETH Zurich and EPFL have discovered a new type of fat cell that suppresses the growth of new fat cells. This opens up new avenues for preventing obesity-related diseases.
Categories: Content

The psychobiology of online gaming

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
When researchers looked at expression of a particular gene complex that is activated by chronic stress, they found differences depending on whether someone was positively engaging in video games or were problematic gamers.
Categories: Content

Your brain anatomy may play a role in determining your food choices

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Our ability to exercise self-control is linked to our neurobiology.
Categories: Content

Fright and flight: Deciding when to escape

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
How does your brain decide what to do in a threatening situation? A new paper published in Nature describes a mechanism by which the brain classifies the level of a threat and decides when to escape.
Categories: Content

Ratchet up the pressure: Molecular machine exploits motion in a single direction

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
A Japanese research team led by Osaka University developed a 'ratchet-like molecular machine,' which promotes uni-directional molecular motion during reactions. Inspired by dumbbell-shaped rotaxanes, their molecular machine contains two rings (stations) connected by spacers. One station has a single methyl attachment, while the other has two, like hooks. Macrocyclic α-cyclodextrin passes from the one-hooked to the two-hooked station, catalyzing deuteration of the former. Therefore, movement and reaction are coupled. This could be used in synthetic molecular motors.
Categories: Content

Beyond conventional solution-process for 2-D heterostructure

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Chinese researchers demonstrated a facile wet-chemical method to directly grow organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (MAPbBr3, MA = CH3NH3+) NCs on surfaces of dispersible MoS2 nanosheets.
Categories: Content

Opening up a drug delivery route -- Discovery of a new vehicle peptide

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
The bottleneck of cationic antimicrobial peptides as anticancer therapeutics is their limited ability to penetrate cell membranes. Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers discovered a cyclic decapeptide (termed peptide 1) that serves as a promising lead compound as a new intracellular delivery vehicle for therapeutically effective peptides. When conjugated with another membrane impermeable proapoptotic domain (PAD) peptide, the compound was found to have significantly inhibitory activity in cancer cell lines.
Categories: Content

Sticklebacks infected with parasites influence behavior of healthy fish

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Certain types of tapeworm make sticklebacks behave carelessly and thus become easier prey for birds. A team of biologists have now demonstrated for the first time that the tapeworm not only influences the behavior of the infected fish -- indirectly, it can also induce risky behaviour in other fish in the group.
Categories: Content

Scientists, students to make first live, interactive broadcasts from Arctic Ocean's Northwest Passage

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
A team of scientists and students, conducting research aboard the R/V Akademik Ioffe, will offer select museums, as well as classrooms and citizen scientists worldwide, an opportunity to explore with them in real time a dramatically changing Arctic Ocean, and to discuss their research in the first-ever live, interactive broadcasts from the fabled Northwest Passage.
Categories: Content

How do horses read human emotional cues?

Eurekalert - Jun 21 2018 - 00:06
Scientists demonstrated for the first time that horses integrate human facial expressions and voice tones to perceive human emotion, regardless of whether the person is familiar or not.
Categories: Content