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What happens when nerve cells stop working?

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Micro-failures in brain functioning occur in conditions such as depression and dementia. In most cases, the lost capacity will return after a while. However, consequential damage will often remain so that the functional capability can only be restored through lengthy treatment -- if at all. For this reason, researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have been investigating what happens during such breakdown phases and looking at possible ways of preventing damage and speeding up the healing processes.
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Purple plant is on the defensive

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
While lavender has long been known for its strong scent and soothing oils, a UBC researcher is exploring the plant's ability to create natural pesticides.
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Plant substance inhibits cancer stem cells

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Lab experiments show that the chemical compound damsin found in the plant Ambrosia arborescens inhibits the growth and spread of cancer stem cells. The similar but synthetically produced ambrosin has the same positive effect, according to researchers at Lund University and University Major of San Andrés in La Paz, Bolivia.
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Computer scientists address gap in messaging privacy

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Researchers have developed a solution to a longstanding problem in the field of end-to-end encryption, a technique that ensures that only sender and recipient can read a message.
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Removing nitrate for healthier ecosystems

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
In a new study, researchers have identified nitrate removal hotspots in landscapes around agricultural streams.
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Red blood cells for transfusion like a good red -- a little older, a little better

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
A landmark Australian research trial has found the transfusion of older stored red blood cells is safe and surprisingly, associated with fewer side effects. In the TRANSFUSE trial, researchers from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre at Monash University in Melbourne led teams in five countries to investigate the effect of the age of transfused red blood cells on critically ill patient's outcomes.
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1 in 3 older adults take something to help them sleep but many don't talk to their doctors

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Sleep doesn't come easily for nearly half of older Americans, and more than a third have resorted to some sort of medication to help them doze off at night, a new national poll finds. But most said they hadn't talked to their doctor about their sleep, even though more than a third said their sleep posed a problem. Half believe -- incorrectly -- that sleep problems just come naturally with age.
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The strange structures of the Saturn nebula

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
The spectacular planetary nebula NGC 7009, or the Saturn Nebula, emerges from the darkness like a series of oddly-shaped bubbles, lit up in glorious pinks and blues. This colourful image was captured by the MUSE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The map -- which reveals a wealth of intricate structures in the dust, including shells, a halo and a curious wave-like feature -- will help astronomers understand how planetary nebulae develop their strange shapes and symmetries.
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Cellular 'message in a bottle' may provide path to new way of treating disease

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
A newly discovered cellular messaging mechanism could lead to a new way to deliver therapeutics to tissues affected by disease, according to a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health study. Researchers found a type of extracellular vesicle -- a sac secreted by cells that contains proteins and RNA molecules -- carries receptors that allow signaling without direct contact between cells.
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Tree-dwelling, coconut-cracking giant rat discovered in Solomon Islands

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Scientists have discovered a new species of giant rat. It's more than four times the size of the black rats that live in the US, it lives in trees, and it's rumored to crack open coconuts with its teeth. It's actually pretty cute.
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Brain disconnections may contribute to Parkinson's hallucinations

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Researchers have found that disconnections of brain areas involved in attention and visual processing may contribute to visual hallucinations in individuals with Parkinson's disease, according to a new study. The disconnected brain areas seen on functional MRI may be valuable in predicting the development of visual hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease.
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Songbird populations may indicate trouble in northwestern forests

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Populations of many North American songbirds are declining, and in many cases we don't understand why. Conservation efforts need this information to be effective, and bird banding stations can help fill in the gaps, providing insights into how demographics vary across space and time. A new study presents ten years of data from banding stations across northern California and southern Oregon and offers new hints on what's driving changes in the region's songbird populations.
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A first look at geographic variation in Gentoo penguin calls

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
Vocal communication is central to the lives of many birds, which use sound to attract mates and defend territories. Penguins are no exception, but we know little about how or why penguin vocalizations vary between isolated populations. A new study takes a broad look at vocalizations across the range of Gentoo penguins and concludes that while their calls do vary from place to place, we still have lots to learn about the processes at work.
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US-Russia-China cooperation could hinder the proliferation of hypersonic missiles

Eurekalert - Sep 27 2017 - 00:09
A new RAND report proposes that despite their differences, Russia, China and the United States should act jointly to head off a little-recognized security threat -- the proliferation of hypersonic missiles beyond the three nations.
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